Search results

Your search found 1231 items
Previous | Next
Sort: Relevance | Topics | Title | Author | Publication Year
turned off because more than 500 resultsView all
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 > >>
Home  / Search Results
Date: 2022
Author(s): Sutcliffe, Adam
Date: 2024
Abstract: This article focuses on the rise of anti-antisemitic discourse in Britain over the past fifteen years. It explores the relationship between the increasingly emotional tone of public discourse in Britain and other western countries and the miring of anti-antisemitism in dynamics of competitive victimhood and ethnic antagonism. The development of this dynamic is traced from the bitter arguments over the representation and reporting of the Palestine/Israel conflict at the time of the Israeli ground assault in the Gaza Strip in early 2009 – with special attention to Caryl Churchill’s short play Seven Jewish Children – through to recent anti-antisemitic interventions such as David Baddiel’s bestselling polemic Jews Don’t Count (2021) and Jonathan Freedland’s verbatim play recently staged at London’s Royal Court Theatre (2022). These interventions, the article shows, call for the ‘normal’ treatment of anti-Jewish prejudice while simultaneously appealing on exceptionalist grounds for public sympathy with Jewish perceptions of antisemitism. The exceptional moral authority widely accorded to anti-antisemitism has made the cause an attractive one for those who resent what they believe to be the unwarranted priority accorded to non-white victimhood. Various forms of anti-antisemitism, such as Baddiel’s, have thus become front-line arguments in shrill culture-war tussles suffused with intellectual confusion and racially tinged rhetorical combat. This racialization, politicization and emotionalization of anti-antisemitism has reached new heights, the article concludes, following the outbreak of war between Israel and Hamas in October 2023.
Date: 2024
Abstract: Antisemitismiä on esiintynyt eri muodoissa useimmissa yhteiskunnissa vuosisatojen ajan. Viime vuosina
juutalaisvähemmistöt ovat eri puolilla maailmalla raportoineet lisääntyneistä antisemitistisistä kokemuksista etenkin sen jälkeen, kun äärijärjestö Hamas hyökkäsi Israeliin 7. lokakuuta 2023.

Tämä selvitys keskittyy itsensä juutalaiseksi identifioivien henkilöiden näkemyksiin ja kokemuksiin
antisemitismistä ja syrjinnästä. Se perustuu määrälliseen ja laadulliseen aineistoon. Tutkimus kohdennettiin 16 vuotta täyttäneille henkilöille, jotka pitävät itseään juutalaisina joko uskonnon, kulttuurin,
kasvatuksen, etnisyyden, sukulaisuussuhteen tai muun syyn perusteella, ja jotka tutkimuksen tekohetkellä asuivat Suomessa.

Selvityksen tiedonkeruu toteutettiin kahdessa vaiheessa. Ensin suoritettiin kyselytutkimus (4.10.–
4.11.2023), jossa vastaajat kertoivat mielipiteitään muun muassa antisemitismistä, kohtaamistaan
antisemitistisistä tapauksista joko internetissä tai sen ulkopuolella, huolistaan antisemitistisen hyökkäyksen uhriksi joutumisesta sekä syrjintäkokemuksistaan Suomessa. Kyselyyn vastasi 334 henkilöä, mikä
laskentatavasta riippuen vastaa noin 17–22 prosenttia Suomessa asuvista juutalaisista. Tutkimuksen
toisessa vaiheessa järjestettiin kaksi fokusryhmähaastattelua, joihin osallistui henkilöitä kuudesta eri
juutalaisjärjestöstä. Heiltä kysyttiin antisemitismin vaikutuksista järjestöjen toimintaan ja jäsenistön elämään. Molemmat fokusryhmähaastattelut toteutettiin 15. marraskuuta 2023.

Vastaajista suurin osa ilmoitti, että antisemitismi on lisääntynyt Suomessa viiden viime vuoden aikana. Vastaajat arvioivat, että suurin ongelma on internetissä ja sosiaalisessa mediassa ilmenevä antisemitismi, ja seuraavaksi suurinta ongelma on mediassa ja poliittisessa elämässä.

Kyselyn tuloksien ja fokusryhmähaastattelujen pohjalta laadittiin suosituksia antisemitismin torjumiseksi, juutalaisvähemmistön turvallisuuden edistämiseksi ja juutalaisen kulttuurin suojaamiseksi myös
moninkertaisten vähemmistöjen näkökulmasta. Suosituksia annettiin myös koulutukseen, juutalaisiin
kohdistuvan väkivallan, syrjinnän ja viharikosten ehkäisyyn, juutalaisen elämän ja kulttuurin turvaamiseen sekä juutalaisuuden tutkimukseen.
Author(s): Wiedemann, Emilie
Date: 2024
Abstract: This thesis is an examination of the international Jewish and non-Jewish politics of opposing antisemitism between 1960 and 2005. It begins with the condemnation of antisemitism by the UN Sub-Commission on the Prevention of Discrimination and Protection of Minorities in 1960. It ends with the European Union Monitoring Centre on Racism and Xenophobia’s (EUMC) working definition of antisemitism, published in 2005. Between these poles, lay a wealth of contestation about what antisemitism is and how to oppose it. Successive challenges and instability for Israel as well as global geopolitical upheaval during this time raised these questions anew. The thesis centres the political agency of a diverse and evolving group of Jewish internationalist actors, including NGOs, community representatives and academics, and analyses their political responses to this context. I explore how these actors debated and contested ideas about how to identify, measure and oppose antisemitism, and with whom to ally in this struggle. At stake was the relationship between antisemitism and anti-Zionism, between anti-antisemitism and anti-racism, between Israel and diaspora, and who represented Jewish interests in the arenas of global governance. These questions brought out significant divides in international Jewish politics, between state and diaspora and among diaspora actors themselves. The thesis ends with an investigation of the immediate roots of the EUMC document in Jewish internationalism; at the same time, I contextualise the EUMC document within the longer arc of the thesis. It was one expression of long-standing, multifaceted and heated debates within international Jewish politics, and of how these debates have played out in international Jewish and non-Jewish political efforts to oppose antisemitism. Overall, I demonstrate that ideas about what antisemitism is were constantly in flux during this period, subject to debate, contestation and negotiation among Jewish and non-Jewish political actors.
Date: 2023
Abstract: Scholars have drawn attention to the prevalence of antizionist campaigning on campus, but previous studies have found lower levels of antisemitism among graduates. In this cross-sectional study, levels of antisemitism were measured among members of a large, demographically representative sample of UK residents (N = 1725), using the Generalised Antisemitism (GeAs) scale. Overall scores, as well as scores for the two subscales of this scale (that is, Judeophobic Antisemitism, JpAs, and Antizionist Antisemitism, AzAs) were measured, with comparisons being made according to educational level (degree-educated vs non-degree educated) and subject area (among degree holders only, classified using the JACS 3.0 principal subject area codes). Degree holders were found to have significantly lower scores than non-degree holders for Generalised Antisemitism and Judeophobic Antisemitism, while scores for Antizionist Antisemitism were effectively identical. Among degree holders, graduates from subjects under the JACS 3.0 umbrella category of Historical and Philosophical Studies exhibited significantly lower scores for Generalised Antisemitism and Judeophobic Antisemitism, and lower scores for Antizionist Antisemitism, although the latter association fell short of significance following application of the Holm-Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons (unsurprisingly, given the large number of hypotheses and the small absolute number of respondents in this category, N = 65). Exploratory analysis of the dataset suggests possible further negative associations with antisemitism for graduates of economics, psychology, and counselling, which may have been concealed by the system of categories employed. These associations may have intuitive theoretical explanations. However, further research will be necessary to test whether they are statistically robust. The article concludes with a discussion of possible theoretical explanations for observed patterns, and some suggestions for further research.
Author(s): Ehmann, Tanja
Date: 2023
Abstract: In 2018 and 2021, the Berlin club scene saw cancel culture clashes in connection with the DJs for Palestine (DJP) boycott campaign, which follows the agenda of the BDS move-ment. I was interested in the discussions about the clashes on social media and want-ed to find out to what extent the argumentation in favor of the DJP boycott campaign reproduces antisemitism. To discuss my findings, I used the Jerusalem Declaration on Antisemitism (JDA). The results of my analysis of the pro-boycott voices on social media show that they positioned themselves in an ideologized and Manichaean manner against Israel and Zionism. People who argued against the boycott were singled out and accused of being white supremacists. In their social media posts, the boycott supporters created a hegemonic and exclusionary space and staged themselves as gatekeepers of human rights. Analysis of the posts with key words from the JDA guidelines delineated in section C as not antisemitic per se show that this judgement has to be rejected in the case of the present study. The critique that is formulated is in most cases destructive and neither balanced nor a qualified approach to a complex situation. What is especially missing is a recognition of how criticism of Zionism or Israel can be loaded with antisemitic tropes. Instead of such recognition, there is denial of antisemitism or counter-accusation. There are dogmatic speech, unilateral blame and defensiveness, but most of the time no reference to contra-dictions and ambivalences towards the boycott campaign and the DJs for Palestine agenda.
Date: 2022
Date: 2024
Abstract: The Annual Antisemitism Worldwide Report, published by Tel Aviv University (TAU) and the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), reveals that 2023 saw an increase of dozens of percentage points in the number of antisemitic incidents in Western countries in comparison to 2022. A particularly steep increase was recorded following the October 7 attacks, but the first nine months of 2023, before the war started, also witnessed a relative increase in the number of incidents in most countries with large Jewish minorities, including the United States, France, the UK, Australia, Italy, Brazil, and Mexico.

According to the Report, in New York, the city with the largest Jewish population in the world, NYPD recorded 325 anti-Jewish hate crimes in 2023 in comparison to the 261 it recorded in 2022, LAPD recorded 165 in comparison to 86, and CPD 50 in comparison to 39. The ADL recorded 7,523 incidents in 2023 compared to 3,697 in 2022 (and according to a broader definition applied, it recorded 8,873); the number of assaults increased from 111 in 2022 to 161 in 2023 and of vandalism from 1,288 to 2,106.
Other countries also saw dramatic increases in the number of antisemitic attacks, according to data collected by the Report from governmental agencies, law enforcement authorities, Jewish organizations, media, and fieldwork.

In France, the number of incidents increased from 436 in 2022 to 1,676 in 2023 (the number of physical assaults increased from 43 to 85); in the UK from 1, 662 to 4,103 (physical assaults from 136 to 266); in Argentina from 427 to 598; in Germany from 2,639 to 3,614; in Brazil from 432 to 1,774; in South Africa from 68 to 207; in Mexico from 21 to 78; in the Netherlands from 69 to 154; in Italy from 241 to 454; and in Austria from 719 to 1,147. Australia recorded 622 antisemitic incidents in October and November 2023, in comparison to 79 during the same period in 2022.
Antisemitic incidents increased also before October 7

While the dramatic increases in comparison to 2022 largely followed October 7, the Report emphasizes that most countries with large Jewish minorities saw relative increases also in the first nine months of 2023, before the war started.

For example, in the United States, ADL data (based on the narrower definition for antisemitic incidents) point to an increase from 1,000 incidents in October-December 2022 to 3,976 in the same period in 2023, but also to an increase from 2,697 incidents between January-September 2022 to 3,547 in the same period in 2023 (NYPD registered a decrease in that period, while LAPD an increase).

In France, the number of incidents during January-September 2023 increased to 434 from 329 during the same period in 2022; in Britain – from 1,270 to 1,404. In Australia, 371 incidents were recorded between January and September 2023, compared to 363 in the same period in 2022. On the other hand, Germany and Austria, where national programs for fighting antisemitism are applied, saw decreases.
Date: 2016
Abstract: W polskim dyskursie publicznym zauważalna jest ciągłość form antysemickich. Według najnowszych badań, z postaw antysemickich się nie wyrasta, a co gorsza, doszło do rewitalizacji mitu o współodpowiedzialności Żydów za śmierć Jezusa Chrystusa. My, jako członkowie i członkinie Żydowskiego Stowarzyszenia Czulent, zaniepokojeni tym faktem, podjęliśmy się zadania zweryfikowania, dlaczego antysemityzmem zainfekowane są coraz młodsze osoby.

W tym celu postanowiliśmy przeanalizować podręczniki edukacji nieformalnej i podręczniki szkolne, dopuszczone do użytku szkolnego przez Ministerstwo Edukacji Narodowej i sprawdzić, czy i jak w podręcznikach przedstawiane są informacje o szeroko rozumianej kulturze, tradycji i historii Żydów w Polsce. Interesowała nas jakość i rzetelność tych informacji.

Dzięki pomocy m.in. Centrum Badań Holokaustu Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego, zrekrutowaliśmy/zrekrutowałyśmy studentki ostatniego roku judaistyki oraz doktorantki Centrum Badań Holocaustu, które przeanalizowały podręczniki.

Na podstawie zebranych materiałów, Alina Cała, Bożena Keff i Anna Lipowska-Teutsch przygotowały artykuły analizujące zastane treści. Interesowało nas to, jaki wpływ treść zawarta w podręczniku ma na młodego odbiorcę i młodą odbiorczynię, uwzględniając tutaj aspekt kulturowy, socjologiczny, historyczny
i psychologiczny. Każdy artykuł wykorzystuje zebrane cytaty z podręczników do języka polskiego, historii, historii i społeczeństwa, wychowania do życia w rodzinie i wiedzy o społeczeństwie. Chcąc ułatwić czytelnikowi/czytelniczce weryfikację cytatów, za każdym razem podawaliśmy w przypisach pełny adres bibliograficzny podręcznika.

Naszym celem było również stworzenie publikacji edukacyjnej, która ma służyć jako narzędzie dla osób zajmujących się edukacją formalną i nieformalną oraz przeciwdziałaniem antysemityzmowi. Dlatego też zostały opracowane artykuły poruszające kwestię antysemityzmu w przestrzeni publicznej (Anna Zawadzka), zjawiska antysemityzmu w Polsce (Anna Makówka-Kwapisiewicz) oraz aspekty psychologiczne i prawne mowy nienawiści (Beata Zadumińska i Szymon Filek).

Spis treści:

Wstęp
Zjawisko antysemityzmu w Polsce na podstawie badań
Analiza podręczników szkolnych i scenariuszy zajęć
Kultura i społeczeństwo w podręcznikach szkolnych z przedmiotów humanistycznych
Kulturoznawcza analiza zawartości podręczników szkolnych związanych z treściami dotyczącymi Żydów (i pokrewnymi)
Pochwała myślenia krytycznego
„Kultywujemy polskość”. Antysemityzm w przestrzeni publicznej
Mowa nienawiści. Sprawcy. Ofiary. Świadkowie
Mowa nienawiści. Aspekty prawne
Biogramy autorów i autorek
. Informacja o projekcie
Informacja o Żydowskim Stowarzyszeniu Czulent
Publikacja powstała w ramach projektu „Antysemityzm nie jest poglądem” zrealizowanego w ramach programu Obywatele dla Demokracji, finansowanego z Funduszy EOG, a także ze środków The Kronhill Pletka Foundation, International Council of Jewish Women, Network of East-West Women oraz dzięki dotacji Kennetha Slatera, Allena Haberberga, Shaloma Levy i Michaela Traisona.
Date: 2023
Abstract: Przez ostatnie dwa lata eksperci i ekspertki współpracujący z Żydowskim Stowarzyszeniem Czulent przy realizacji projektu „Zintegrowany system monitorowania antysemickich przestępstw i mowy nienawiści oraz pomocy i wsparcia dla członków społeczności żydowskiej” katalogowali i analizowali nienawistne wpisy, symbole i znaki znalezione w przestrzeni publicznej oraz na platformach mediów społecznościowych. Celem tychże działań, była analiza nienawistych treści wymierzonych w społeczność żydowską. Badając sposoby wykorzystania mediów społecznościowych, symboli i memów w próbach indoktrynacji i ataków na grupy mniejszościowe oraz reakcje organów ścigania czy wymiaru sprawiedliwości, doszliśmy do wniosku, iż nadal dominuje niska świadomość społeczna na temat praktyk i obrazów współcześnie promujących nienawiść.

Wychodząc naprzeciw potrzebom osób działających na rzecz praw człowieka, stworzyliśmy niniejsze opracowanie w którym zebrano przykłady symboli, pojawiających się w przestrzeni publicznej, aby zilustrować ich dwuznaczność, ironię i wiarygodne zaprzeczenia, dając możliwość osobom aktywistycznym narzędzia w rozszyfrowaniu i zmierzeniu się z symboliką nienawiści.

Wychodząc z założenia, iż nienawiść nie ogranicza się do żadnego spektrum ideologicznego, zebraliśmy i opracowaliśmy materiały, które wykorzystywane są do ataków na grupy mniejszościowe i nie tylko. Publikacja została ponadto poszerzona o perspektywę socjologiczną, uwzględniającą nienawistne znaki w domenie symbolicznej autorstwa Lecha M. Nijakowskiego. Psychologiczne aspekty mowy nienawiści opracowane przez Mikołaja Winiewskiego oraz praktyczne rozwiązania prawne opracowane przez Joanna Grabarczyk-Anders, Jacka Mazurczaka oraz Tomasza Plaszczyka.

Publikacja ta, zawiera nie tylko symbole związane z ruchami skrajnymi, które są dostrzegane przez społeczeństwo i jednoznacznie odbierane jako przejaw nienawiści, ale również takie, które nie wzbudzają zainteresowania czy niepokoju ponieważ eksponują niejasne i kontekstowe symbole nienawiści wykorzystywane bez większych konsekwencji, jeśli w ogóle. Są to symbole i znaki, które wykorzystują ironie, humor, przekierowanie na inny temat, błędną charakterystykę i estetykę, aby zawoalować swoje przekonania i zatrzymać „normies” w nienawiści.

Strategia ta polega na przywłaszczaniu symboli i przypisywaniu im nienawistnego znaczenia. W tym kontekście, na przykład gest „okay” czy żaba Pepe, mogłoby się wydawać dają możliwość wiarygodnego odpierania zarzutu o szerzenie nienawiści i ośmieszają oskarżyciela. Co w konsekwencji przyczynia się do zakodowanego funkcjonowania nienawiść w głównym nurcie. Mając ponadto na uwadze przyswajalność nowych technologii i platform komunika-
cyjnych, wiele ruchów nienawiści dostosowało się do młodzieżowych platform, takich jak TikTok, Instagram, Twitch czy Discord. Równie sprawnie wykorzystują serwery gier wideo, by radykalizować, propagując nienawiść i nienawistne zachowanie. Budują w ten sposób sieć kontaktów, mobilizują nowe grupy dla poparcia skrajnych grup czy partii politycznych, burząc podział pomiędzy światem online i światem offline. W ten sposób nienawiść ograniczona do ekstremalnych przestrzeni online, jest normalizowana i coraz częściej pojawia się w „prawdziwym życiu”, gdzie często jest powiązana z przypadkami terroryzmu
na całym świecie.

Dlatego tak ważne są rozwiązania systemowe, bazujące na wsparciu infrastruktury badawczej i edukacyjnej, zaangażowania organizacji non-profit oraz grup społecznych w przeciwdziałanie nienawiści. Niewystarczające jest
ustanowienie prawa przeciwko stale ewoluującym praktykom nienawistnym
grup skrajnych, bez rozwiązań edukacyjnych w tym zakresie, prewencyjnych i informacyjnych. Bez podejścia międzysektorowego tworzy się przestrzeń dla grup i ruchów nienawiści, które w pełni mogą działać na wolności i szerzyć nienawiść.
Mamy nadzieje, że nasze opracowanie przyczyni się do zmiany i będzie
zaczątkiem takiej współpracy.

Spis treści:

Domeny symboliczne i nienawistne znaki. Perspektywa socjologiczna. Lech M. Nijakowski
Psychologiczne aspekty mowy nienawiści. Mikołaj Winiewski
Znaki nienawiści – katalog. Anna Makówka-Kwapisiewicz
Zawiadomienie o przestępstwie i co dalej? – uwagi praktyczne. Tomasz Plaszczyk
Postępowania dotyczące mowy nienawiści w Internecie. Joanna Grabarczyk-Anders, Tomasz Plaszczyk, Jacek Mazurczak
Słowniczek podstawowych pojęć. Tomasz Plaszczyk
Kazusy – przykłady zawiadomień o przestępstwach z nienawiści

Publikacja powstała w ramach projektu „Zintegrowany system monitorowania antysemickich przestępstw i mowy nienawiści oraz pomocy i wsparcia dla członków społeczności żydowskiej”, realizowanego przez Żydowskie Stowarzyszenie Czulent oraz Gminę Wyznaniową Żydowską w Warszawie. Projekt finansowany ze środków Unii Europejskiej w ramach programu Prawa, Równość i Obywatelstwo na lata 2014-2020 oraz Fundacji Pamięć, Odpowiedzialność i Przyszłość (EVZ).
Date: 2022
Abstract: Jewish Association Czulent as an advocacy organization working to spread tolerance and shape attitudes of openness towards national, ethnic and religious minorities, with particular emphasis on counteracting anti-Semitism and discrimination, taking into account cross-discrimination.

Observing the public debate on hate speech and hate crimes, which increasingly appears in the mainstream, we have noticed a high level of its politicization. This is particularly visible in the topic of anti-Semitism, which is even instrumentalized and used as a political tool.

The politicization and exploitation of hate thus influences discussions about hate crimes. In this way, we do not focus on the solutions and functioning of investigative bodies or courts, but on political "colors". As a result, injured people lose their human dimension and become only the subject of statistics.

Instead of focusing on eliminating the phenomenon or analyzing the increase in hate speech and hate crimes. We focus on the discourse regarding the uniqueness and tolerance of the "Polish nation". This contributes to the phenomenon of underreporting, and people and groups that require support and are particularly vulnerable to hateful attacks are afraid to report such attacks and seek support.

Therefore, we decided to focus on the injured people in our actions. We analyzed the individual stages, from the decision to report a crime to the final court judgment. The respondents represented various social groups, which allowed us to learn from different perspectives about the experiences and emotions that accompanied them at particular stages. In the interviews we conducted, we paid attention to the actors who appeared at various stages, which is why our study includes, in addition to the police, prosecutor's office, and courts, non-governmental organizations and the media.

We hope that our activities and research will contribute to supporting people exposed to such attacks and a comprehensive understanding of the challenges faced not only by people injured in hate crimes, but also by their representatives, investigators, prosecutors and judges. We encourage you to use the research cited, but also to develop and expand it.

Contents:

Information on the survey and methodology
Hate crimes – experiences
Human rights defenders
Directive 2012/29/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council
Gender aspects
Hate crimes – enhancements are needed
Summary and final conclusions
The publication was created thanks to funding from the Foundation Remembrance, Responsibility and Future (EVZ Foundation), as part of the project "Pre-project for the Project: Strategic Litigation as one of the Tools to Counteract Antisemitism on the Internet".
Date: 2024
Date: 2024
Abstract: The experience and perceptions of the Jewish community and wider European population, recorded antisemitic incidents, the increasing level of antisemitic content online and sociological research show the persisting presence of antisemitism in the European Union. A 2021 survey on the prevalence and intensity of anti-Jewish prejudices in 16 European countries found that on average, 20 % of the population in the countries under scrutiny can be regarded as (strongly or moderately) antisemitic, whereas the proportion of latent antisemites was 14 %, with six countries where the aggregate proportion of strongly, moderately and latently antisemitic people was above 50 %. Research has also shown – and it has also been reported from a number of Member States in the context of the current report – that the consecutive crises of the Covid-19 pandemic and the Russian aggression on Ukraine have intensified antisemitic sentiments across Europe. The cut-off date of the research on which the report is based was 7 July 2023, therefore, the study does not reflect the unprecedented spike in antisemitism and antisemitic incidents in Europe and across the world following the horrific terrorist attacks by Hamas on Israeli civilians on 7 October 2023. Thus, the impact of the attacks and their aftermath could not be taken into account in this study. With a view to combating racial and/or religious hatred, including antisemitism, the European Union has not only adopted policies and commitments, but it has also put in place numerous legal instruments that can be used to counter different forms of antisemitism, including but not limited to the Framework Decision on combating certain forms of expressions of racism and xenophobia, the Racial Equality Directive, the Employment Equality Directive, and the Victims’ Rights Directive. The importance of effectively applying this legislation to fight antisemitism is emphasised in the EU Strategy on combating antisemitism and fostering Jewish life (2021-2030), in which the European Union pledged to ‘step up action to actively prevent and combat’ the phenomenon in all its forms. This thematic report provides a comparative overview of how these legal instruments have been complied with in the 27 EU Member States, and aims to establish how and to what extent the legal framework and its practical application in the different Member States provide protection against antisemitism in three main areas: (i) non-discrimination; (i) hate crimes; and (iii) hate speech. It identifies gaps in the existing legal protections and/or their enforcement across the EU Member States and makes recommendations on mechanisms for the provision of effective protection against acts motivated by antisemitism.
Date: 2024
Date: 2024
Abstract: This article examines the relationship between the Far Right and Holocaust memory politics in the Netherlands through an in-depth analysis of the antisemitic and conspiratorial discourse of far-right politician Thierry Baudet and his party, Forum for Democracy (FvD). While the FvD positioned themselves as a victim of establishment politics from the outset, the party used their opposition to government COVID-19 policies to bolster the image of themselves as victim of state power as well as Jewish conspiracies.

This article argues that Baudet’s Holocaust relativization and his criticism of the evolving character of Dutch Holocaust memory are intimately tied to his and the FvD’s antisemitic worldview, in which Jews are to blame for the decline of a mythologized white, Christian Dutch nation. In this context, the FvD used Holocaust analogies on social media, in the Dutch parliament, and during rallies to simultaneously accuse Jews of exploiting a victim identity for moral legitimacy and to contest the government’s acknowledgment of Dutch collaboration and inclusion of Jewish experiences into a broader national narrative of the Second World War. In posing these challenges to the status of the Holocaust in contemporary memory politics, Baudet and the FvD attempt to rewrite Dutch history with the white, Christian population as the true bearers of Dutch heritage and identity. Examining the character and normalization of Holocaust relativization in a country still lauded internationally for its tolerance despite its delayed process of ‘coming to terms’ with its Holocaust past demonstrates the centrality of memory politics to far-right ideologies.
Date: 2024
Date: 2024
Abstract: Unia publie un rapport consacré à l’antisémitisme en Belgique (2024) et formule 10 recommandations. Ce travail d’analyse, basé sur les dossiers de 2018 à 2022, est structuré en deux volets. Le second volet est dédié à l’impact des évènements tragique du 7 octobre 2023 sur les signalements reçus par ses services.

I. L’antisémitisme en Belgique. Analyse et recommandations au départ des dossiers traités par Unia entre 2018 et 2022
En 2021, Unia a publié une note relative à l’antisémitisme et à la définition de l’IHRA. Le temps ne s’est pas arrêté dans l’intervalle. Les rapports de recherche ainsi que les signalements adressés à Unia et à d’autres acteurs, aux organisations juives et à la police indiquent que toutes sortes de messages de haine et délits de haine antisémites, notamment sur les réseaux sociaux, demeurent une triste réalité et que la lutte contre l’antisémitisme doit s’intensifier.

Dans le présent rapport, nous revenons d’abord succinctement sur l’analyse de 2021, puis nous passons en revue les différentes définitions des faits antisémites (qu’il s’agisse de définitions juridiques ou de définitions de travail alternatives) et leur utilisation dans la pratique.

II. L’impact du conflit israélo-palestinien : discours et délits de haine en Belgique – focus sur les signalements entre 7 octobre et le 7 décembre 2023
En raison de la tragique actualité, Unia a rédigé un document annexe au rapport, qui examine l’impact du conflit sur son activité.

En deux mois, entre le 7 octobre 2023 et le 7 décembre 2023, 91 signalements ont été enregistrés, dont 66 font explicitement référence à l’ascendance juive. Il s’agit essentiellement de messages de haine, pour plus de la moitié en ligne, mais aussi de propos tenus dans l’espace public. Unia est par ailleurs en contact avec le parquet et la police dans 9 dossiers relatifs à des agressions et dégradations.

A titre de comparaison, l’an passé, Unia a enregistré en moyenne entre 4 et 5 signalements par mois.

Le conflit ne change pas la nature des actes, mais il accroît leur intensité en raison d’un effet de loupe. Le même phénomène a été observé en 2008-2009.


Het rapport antisemitisme in België (2024) van Unia bestaat uit 2 delen: de analyse van de dossiers van 2018 tot 2022 en de impact van de tragische gebeurtenissen sinds 7 oktober 2023 op de nieuwe meldingen. We doen ook 10 aanbevelingen.

I. Antisemitisme in België. Analyse en aanbevelingen op basis van dossiers behandeld door Unia tussen 2018 en 2022
In 2021 publiceerde Unia een nota over antisemitisme en de definitie van de IHRA. De tijd is ondertussen niet stil blijven staan. Onderzoeksrapporten en meldingen bij Unia en bij onder meer Joodse organisaties en politie geven aan dat verschillende vormen van haatspraak (vooral op sociale media) en antisemitische misdrijven een jammerlijke realiteit blijven. De strijd tegen antisemitisme moet duidelijk worden opgevoerd.

In het rapport antisemitisme (2024) kijken we eerst kort terug op de analyse van 2021 en gaan we vervolgens in op verschillende definities van antisemitische feiten (zowel juridische definities als alternatieve werkdefinities) en hun praktische toepassing.

II. Impact van het Israëlisch-Palestijns conflict: haatspraak en -misdrijven in België – focus op de meldingen van 7 oktober tot 7 december 2023
Na de tragische gebeurtenissen sinds 7 oktober stelde Unia een bijlage op die de impact van het conflict op de meldingen analyseert.

In de 2 maanden tussen 7 oktober 2023 en 7 december 2023 werden 91 meldingen geregistreerd, waarvan er 66 expliciet verwijzen naar Joodse afstamming. Het gaat vooral om haatberichten, waarvan meer dan de helft online, maar ook uitlatingen in de openbare ruimte. Unia had in 9 gevallen contact met het parket en de politie voor dossiers over agressies en beschadigingen.

Ter vergelijking: vorig jaar registreerde Unia gemiddeld 4 à 5 meldingen per maand.

Het conflict heeft geen impact op de aard van de daden, maar verhoogt wel de intensiteit ervan. Hetzelfde fenomeen werd overigens waargenomen in 2008-2009
Date: 2024
Abstract: Scholars have drawn attention to the prevalence of antizionist campaigning on campus, but previous studies have found lower levels of antisemitism among graduates. In this cross-sectional study, levels of antisemitism were measured among members of a large, demographically representative sample of UK residents (N = 1725), using the Generalised Antisemitism (GeAs) scale. Overall scores, as well as scores for the two subscales of this scale (that is, Judeophobic Antisemitism, JpAs, and Antizionist Antisemitism, AzAs) were measured, with comparisons being made according to educational level (degree-educated vs non-degree educated) and subject area (among degree holders only, classified using the JACS 3.0 principal subject area codes). Degree holders were found to have significantly lower scores than non-degree holders for Generalised Antisemitism and Judeophobic Antisemitism, while scores for Antizionist Antisemitism were effectively identical. Among degree holders, graduates from subjects under the JACS 3.0 umbrella category of Historical and Philosophical Studies exhibited significantly lower scores for Generalised Antisemitism and Judeophobic Antisemitism, and lower scores for Antizionist Antisemitism, although the latter association fell short of significance following application of the Holm-Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons (unsurprisingly, given the large number of hypotheses and the small absolute number of respondents in this category, N = 65). Exploratory analysis of the dataset suggests possible further negative associations with antisemitism for graduates of economics, psychology, and counselling, which may have been concealed by the system of categories employed. These associations may have intuitive theoretical explanations. However, further research will be necessary to test whether they are statistically robust. The article concludes with a discussion of possible theoretical explanations for observed patterns, and some suggestions for further research
Date: 2020
Abstract: The present report provides an overview of data on antisemitism as recorded by international organisations and by official and unofficial sources in the European Union (EU) Member States. Furthermore, the report includes data concerning the United Kingdom, which in 2019 was still a Member State of the EU. For the first time, the report also presents available statistics and other information with respect to North Macedonia and Serbia, as countries with an observer status to the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA). All data presented in the report are based on the respective countries’ own definitions and categorisations of antisemitic behaviour. At the same time, an increasing number of countries are using the working definition of antisemitism developed by the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA), and there are efforts to further improve hate crime data collection in the EU, including through the work of the Working Group on hate crime recording, data collection and encouraging reporting (2019–2021), which FRA facilitates. ‘Official data’ are understood in the context of this report as those collected by law enforcement agencies, other authorities that are part of criminal justice systems and relevant state ministries at national level. ‘Unofficial data’ refers to data collected by civil society organisations.

This annual overview provides an update on the most recent figures on antisemitic incidents, covering the period 1 January 2009 – 31 December 2019, across the EU Member States, where data are available. It includes a section that presents the legal framework and evidence from international organisations. The report also provides an overview of national action plans and other measures to prevent and combat antisemitism, as well as information on how countries have adopted or endorsed the non-legally binding working definition of antisemitism adopted by the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) (2016) as well as how they use or intend to use it.

This is the 16th edition of FRA’s report on the situation of data collection on antisemitism in the EU (including reports published by FRA’s predecessor, the European Monitoring Centre on Racism and Xenophobia).