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Date: 2018
Author(s): Miller, Helena
Date: 2014
Abstract: This summer has been a challenging and exceptional one for Israel Tour madrichim, who have run Tour during a period of ferocious hostilities between Israel and Gaza, which have impacted on both the itineraries and the day to day running of their groups. They have had to deal with sirens, taking their groups into shelters, hearing explosions afar and nearby, the political situation and last minute changes to itineraries caused by the security situation. This of course, has been in addition to the regular stresses and challenges of being responsible for a group of 35-40 sixteen year olds for three and a half weeks in Israel.

Remarkably, the chanichim have almost without exception had a fantastic time. UJIA felt, however, that it would be the responsible way forward to follow up with all madrichim on their return, to do the following:

a) To thank the madrichim
b) To acknowledge concern for the welfare for the madrichim
c) To see if there are any particular chanichim requiring follow up
d) To find out the extent to which Tour Providers/YMs/UJIA/taglit/other agencies and individuals were supportive to them and their chanichim before and during the time in Israel
e) To find out if the madrichim would like/need additional support/counselling etc now that they are home.
f) To find out whether the madrichim have any advice for UJIA regarding our handling of the situation, handling of the madrichim and YMs, and could this be improved upon for the future.
In addition, we agreed that a letter of appreciation and thanks would be emailed to all madrichim just prior to return. In the email, they were told that a named person (usually their UJIA contact) would ‘phone them within a couple of days of their return to debrief and check how they are.
Date: 2009
Abstract: Key issues and findings are as follows:

1. 30% of Jewish 18 year olds take a Gap Year after finishing school.

2. 17% of Jewish 18 year olds currently choose an Israel Gap Year.

3. That percentage is decreasing.

4. The cost of the Israel Gap Year has risen from £7,000 - £11,000 in three years.

5. That cost is within proportion of some non-Israel Gap Year programmes. It is higher than others.

6. For many families, the cost of Israel Gap Year is prohibitive. The finances of the Israel Gap Year must be reviewed. This must include issues related to length, structure and content of the year, bursaries, saving schemes, raising funds etc.

7. The variable quality of the Machon and the price of the Machon is making it a challenging component of the programme.

8. The volunteering programme must address the issues stated in the UJIA Review of Volunteering paper (2008)

9. Better marketing will lead to higher recruitment. Marketing of the UJIA Israel Gap Year needs to be as sophisticated as marketing for non-Israel Gap Years

10. Follow through of chanichim after Israel Tour must be better addressed by the Youth Movements in the UK.

11. The possibility of developing shorter options (5-6 months) must be explored seriously.

12. The option of making the programme modular – 3 month modules that participants can pick and choose from and opt in and out of – must be explored.

13. UJIA and the Youth Movements must explore the possibility of better integration between the sections of the Gap Year.

14. UJIA and the Youth Movements should explore the desirability and possibility of including a three month component overseas, possibly volunteering in Europe or in a developing country.

15. The staffing of the Israel Experience team should be reviewed to ensure adequate cover both in the UK and in Israel, particularly at present when staff cuts and turnover of staff is acute.

16. The impact of the Gap Year on its participants is one of its unique selling points and should not be under-estimated. It should be integrated into the marketing strategy.
Date: 2015
Abstract: Three previous research projects undertaken by the Research and Evaluation Department of UJIA between 2012 and 2014 have been re-analysed to extract anything relevant to identify the Jewish journey taken by key individuals within the Jewish community.

Gap year research data indicates that almost 40% of respondents who have been on a Gap year or Yeshiva/Seminary in Israel identify themselves as Modern Orthodox and almost 60% had also attended a Jewish school.

49% respondents stated they chose their Gap year organisation because they had previously been on Israel Tour with them and 65% regularly participated in their activities.

From those Gap year graduates amongst the Youth Commission respondents, more than 65% said they were currently involved with a Youth organisation. This is reinforced by nearly 60% of respondents to the Israel Experience survey who had also been on a Gap year stating they had attended a JSoc and a similar percentage were still part of their youth movement. 30% stated they had been fundraising for Israel or had donated to UJIA.

Most of the Gap year respondents felt that going on their Gap year had a positive influence on the likelihood to engage with the Jewish community in the future.

The respondents to the Israel Experience Survey (2012) who had also been on a Gap year, mostly thought their Gap year had been extremely important in shaping their Jewish life, even more so than their family or youth movement.

The Gap year research suggested that almost 70% of respondents, who had previously been on a Gap year, felt that the whole experience had positively affected their likelihood to make Aliyah.

16 individual stories from these previous research studies have been used to highlight some of the Jewish journeys completed by some of our leaders since their time on Gap year.
Date: 2014
Date: 2004
Editor(s): Boyd, Jonathan
Date: 2003
Abstract: Papers based on a conference convened by the United Jewish Israel Appeal in London in spring 2002. Contents include: Introduction: The sovereign and the situated self: Jewish identity and community in the 21st century – Jonathan Boyd; D’var Torah – Shalom Orzach; Exploring the challenges confronting the contemporary Jewish world – Irwin Cotler, Steven M. Cohen; A case of new identity: detecting the forces facing Jewish identity and community – Steven M. Cohen, Kate Loewenthal; A case of new identity: what should all Jews know? – Hanah Alexander, Aviezer Ravitsky; Looking in, looking out: the role of the Jew in the contemporary world – David Cesarani, Alan Hoffman; Looking in, looking out: on what should our educational efforts be focused? – Michael Rosenak, Irwin Cotler; Educating our children: exploring the role of the Jewish day school- Hanah Alexander, Barry Kosmin; Educating our children: imagining the Jewish day school of the future – Barry Chazan, Beverly Gribetz; Creating community: is the synagogue doing what is needed? – Margaret Harris, Michael Rosenak; Creating community: envisaging the synagogue of the 21st century – Charles Liebman, Robert Rabinowitz; Judaism and the contemporary world: foundation principles of Jewish identity and community for the 21st century - Aviezer Ravitsky, Jonathan Sacks; D’var Torah – Angela Gluck Wood; Exploring our general context: the impact of national and global trends on identity, community and education – Barry Kosmin, Steven M. Cohen; Exploring our Jewish context: trends in the Jewish world, and how to utilise them for our benefit – Jonathan Ariel, Tony Bayfield; Struggling for Israel: what happens when the classroom becomes dangerous? – Barry Chazan; Reaching out to others: the role of a social action agenda in Jewish education – Edie Friedman, Reuven Gal; Spiritual exploration: following my head or my heart? – Zvi Beckerman, Michael Shire; Civics: should British Jews swear allegiance to Britain? – Clive Lawton, Robert Rabinowitz; D’var Torah – Raphael Zarum; The role of vision in 21st century education – Jonathan Arield, Michael Rosenak; Case study 1: Texts and Values Project of the UJIA Makor Centre for Informal Jewish Education – Raphael Zarum; Case study 2: Limmud – Jacqueline Nicholls; Case study 3: Synagogue transformation – Julian Resnick; Case study 4: King Solomon High School – Alastair Falk; Case study 5: The Saatchi Synagogue – Pini Dunner 
Date: 2016