Search results

Your search found 163 items
Previous | Next
Sort: Relevance | Topics | Title | Author | Publication Year View all 1 2 3 4
Home  / Search Results
Date: 2019
Date: 2019
Abstract: This study investigates the ethnic identity of the 1.5 and second-generation of Russian-speaking Jewish immigrants to Germany and the U.S. in the most recent wave of immigration. Between 1989 and the mid-2000s, approximately 320,000 Russian-speaking Jewish immigrants departed the (former) Soviet Union for the U.S. and an additional 220,000 moved to Germany. The 1.5 and second-generations have successfully integrated into mainstream institutions, like schools and the workforce, but not the co-ethnic Jewish community in each country. Moreover, Russian-speaking Jewish immigrants are subject to a number of critiques, most prominently, of having a ‘thin culture’ that relies on abstract forms of ethnic expression and lacks in frequent and concrete forms of identification (Gitelman 1998).

The study asks several questions: how the 1.5 and second-generation see themselves as a distinctive social group? Where do they locate social boundaries between themselves and others? How do they maintain them? Close family ties lie at the center of the group’s ethnic identity. Russian-speaking cultures offer an alternative, and in the mind of the 1.5 and second-generation, superior approach to relating to family and friends, where, for example, being an unmarried adult does not contradict living at home or where youths and adults can socialize in the same setting. Their understandings and practices of family often run counter to the expectations of the mainstream in both Germany and the U.S. of what it means to be an independent adult. The organization and expectation of social relations among these immigrants reflect not only their different national origins, but their constitution as a distinctive moral community. Different foods and language use support these immigrants’ sense of group distinctiveness and reinforce the centrality of family as a shared ethnic practice.

Immigration has endowed family practices with the capacity to impart a sense of distinctiveness to the 1.5 and second-generation by changing the context in which close family ties are practiced. Transported across national borders these practices now contrast with prevailing understandings of family and serve as a cultural resource. Moreover, Russian-speaking Jewish immigrants have benefited, both culturally and economically, from state policies that granted them refugee status and enabled them to cross national borders as families and avoid years of separation other immigrants often must endure. The distinctiveness of Russian-speaking Jewish immigrants’ family practices is relative to those of the receiving country’s mainstream, but not those of other immigrant groups. As a result, a sense of group difference and belonging anchored in these practices may be challenging to impart to the third generation, who are removed from the immigration experience. Nevertheless, the 1.5 and second-generation experience their family relationships, obligations and expectations as anything but ‘thin’. They inform consequential decisions, are encountered regularly, and offer meaning to their lives as individuals, children and members of an immigrant and ethnic group.

This study draws on in-depth interviews in New York City and multiple locations in Germany with 93 Russian-speaking Jewish immigrants who arrived at the age of 13 or younger or were born in the U.S. or Germany. Despite the different history and structure of Jewish communities in the U.S. and Germany, 1.5 and second-generation Russian-speaking Jewish immigrants’ experience in each country have much in common with one another, a finding that emerged as a result of the study’s comparative design.
Editor(s): Белова, O. B.
Date: 2019
Abstract: Отталкиваясь от распространенных в антисионистской кампании обвинений евреев-эмигрантов и отказников в меркантильности и потребительстве, статья рассматривает вещественный мир и его осмысление в советском и еврейском нарративах эмиграции, сосредотачиваясь на трех ситуациях: иммиграция вещей, эмиграция вещей и вещь как альтернатива эмиграции. Отмечая предубеждение против материального как традиционную установку мемуаристов, причисляющих себя к интеллигенции, автор тем не менее обнаруживает несколько категорий вещей, регулярно упоминаемых в разнообразных рассказах о своей и чужой эмиграции, и исследует то, как эти вещи проблематизируются и социализируются, превращаясь из
машинально используемых предметов в «социальные объекты», наделенные в антагонистичных нарративах различным, иногда противоположным, значением.
Author(s): Flax, Maya
Date: 2019
Abstract: Records of antisemitic incidents in the UK have reached an all-time high in the last 3-5 years. I have used antisemitism to mean in this study: any form of hostility or prejudice towards Jews based on their identity. The main objective of this study is to explore a section of the Jewish community, which has been marginalised in research on antisemitism: The Orthodox Jewish community. Being most visible, as identifiable Jews, within the Jewish community, they are also the ones most frequently targeted. Drawing on qualitative data resulting from 28 interviews with Orthodox Jewish individuals as well as five focus groups with key stakeholder, this thesis explored the lived experienced of antisemitism within the Orthodox Jewish community. It investigated the types of antisemitic incidents, the impacts and meaning which participants attached to these incidents, the perceptions of antisemitism, the coping mechanisms which were adopted in order to respond to the climate of antisemitism and the perceptions of agencies which respond to antisemitism. The thesis generated four main findings. First, the pervasive nature of antisemitism and its prevalence within the lives of Orthodox Jews. Second, the awareness that there is a resurgence of antisemitism and that there has been a shift in its manifestation, making it more institutionalised and therefore powerful. Third, that despite the high prevalence rate of incidents among the community, most respondents chose to normalise and accept the victimisation. My thesis proposes that the reasons respondents were able to show agency and to accept the incidents is due to their strong religious identity and their close 3 community ties. Finally, this study offers recommendations to support the Orthodox Jewish community; to address in a practical way some remediable issues uncovered by this study.
Editor(s): Leiße, Olaf
Date: 2019
Author(s): Rock, Jonna
Date: 2019
Abstract: This study analyzes issues of language and Jewish identification pertaining to the Sephardim in Sarajevo. Complexity of the Sarajevo Sephardi history means that I explore Bosnia-Herzegovina/Yugoslavia, Israel and Spain as possible identity-creating factors for the Sephardim in Sarajevo today. My findings show that the elderly Sephardic generation insist on calling their language Serbo-Croatian, whereas the younger generations do not really know what language they speak – and laugh about the linguistic situation in Sarajevo, or rely on made-up categories such as ‘Sarajevan.’ None of the interviewees emphasize the maintenance of Judeo-Spanish as a crucial condition for the continuation of Sephardic culture in Sarajevo. Similarly, the celebration of Jewish holidays is more important for the maintenance of identity across the generations than speaking a Jewish language. At the same time, the individuals also assert alternative forms of being Bosnian, ones that encompass multiple ethnicities and religious ascriptions. All the youngest interviewees however fear that the Sarajevo Sephardic identity will disappear in a near future. Unique characteristics of Sarajevo Sephardim include the status of the Sephardim and minorities in Bosnia and Herzegovina given (1) the discriminatory Bosnian Constitution; (2) the absence of a law in Bosnia on the return of property; (3) the special situation wherein three major ethnic groups, and not just a single, ethnically homogeneous ‘majority,’ dominate the country; (4) the lack of a well-developed Jewish cultural infrastructure. Despite all of this, a rapprochement between the Sarajevo Jewish Community members and their religion and tradition is taking place. This phenomenon is partly attributable to the Community’s young religious activist and chazan, Igor Kožemjakin, who has attracted younger members to the religious services.
Author(s): Bronec, Jakub
Date: 2019
Author(s): Kalhousová, Irena
Date: 2019
Abstract: This thesis analyses three Central European countries – Poland, the Czech Republic, and Hungary - and their relations with Israel. I chose these three Central European countries because they share the same geopolitical space and historical experience. These three Central European countries and Israel are geographically distant, face different geopolitical threats, and have only a few policy issues in common. Nonetheless, ‘the question of Israel’ has been very much present in the foreign policies of Poland, the Czech Republic, and Hungary. Building on constructivism and IR scholarship that engages with memory studies, this thesis explores the process of national identity re-formation and its impact on the formulation of national interest. Specifically, it focuses on: a) past legacies, institutionalized in collective memory and expressed in narratives, which linger over and constrain policy choices; b) the role of decision-makers with a special focus on their role in national identity re-formation in times when a policy is in transition and when a new regime must establish its legitimacy. I look at the historical roots of the relations of the three Central European countries with Israel. I do so by analysing the role of the Jewish question in the nation-building process of Polish, Czech, and Hungarian nations. Further, I argue that as the three former Communist countries started to re-define their relations with Israel, the legacy of the Jewish question has had a significant impact on the formulation of their foreign policies towards the Jewish state.
Date: 2019
Abstract: Antisemitismus in der Schule ist ein öffentliches Thema, dem sich manche schulische Akteure entziehen möchten. Wenn man sich des Themas nur anlassbezogen und sporadisch, beispielswiese in einer Projektwoche, annimmt, kann man Diskussionen über die Frage vermeiden, ob einzelne Kolleg(inn)en im eigenen Lehrkörper Antisemit(inn)en sind, ob es Schüler/-innen gibt, bei denen Antisemitismus ein manifestes Problem darstellt, das nicht mehr pädagogisch gelöst werden kann oder auch, ob Lehrpläne und Unterrichtsmaterialien überhaupt den Ansprüchen genügen, um mittel- und langfristig eine Minimierung von Antisemitismus herbeizuführen.

Das vorliegende wissenschaftliche Gutachten will das Feld „Antisemitismus in der Schule“ systematisch erfassen und aufzeigen, an welchen Stellen welche Erkenntnisse der Forschungen über Antisemitismus und politische Bildung umgesetzt werden müssten, wollte man etwas am Antisemitismus in der Schule ändern. Denn es ist naheliegend, dass die Gründe für die unzureichende Handlungsbereitschaft mancher beteiligter Akteure nicht in erster Linie in Unwissenheit liegt, sondern neben weltanschaulichen Gründen auch materielle und finanzielle eine Rolle spielen.

Das Gutachten wird Erkenntnisse der Forschung systematisch darstellen, offene Fragen benennen und am Ende konkrete Handlungsempfehlungen formulieren - viele davon sind Samuel Salzborn/Alexandra Kurth: Antisemitismus in der Schule 5evident und offensichtlich, ob man sie umsetzen will und wird, hängt von der politischen Prioritätensetzung und damit auch von der Frage ab, ob Antisemitismus als zentrales Problemfeld von und für Schulen erkannt wird oder ob man sich weiterhin auf eine punktuelle, von Prinzipien der Aufmerksamkeitsökonomie geprägte Feuerwehrpolitik orientieren möchte, die von den zahlreichen Herausforderungen kaum eine löst, wenngleich die meisten von ihnen - so die vorweggenommene Grundeinschätzung dieses Gutachtens - durchaus gelöst werden könnten
Date: 2019
Abstract: Mit dem im Dezember 2019 geschlossenen Staatsvertrag zwischen der Bundesrepublik Deutschland und dem Zentralrat der Juden in Deutschland zur Einrichtung eines Militärrabbinats in der Bundeswehr kommen auf dieses vielerlei Aufgaben zu: neben der seelsorgerlichen Betreuung der jüdischen Bundeswehrangehörigen etwa die Vermittlung ethischer Orientierungen oder die Sensibilisierung gegenüber unterschiedlichen Ausdrucksformen des Antisemitismus. Während die Bundeswehr zunehmend auch für junge Juden und Jüdinnen als Arbeitgeber attraktiv wird, ist die Aufnahme von Rabbinern und Rabbinerinnen ein weiteres Zeichen für die Verankerung der jüdischen Gemeinschaft in der Gesellschaft.
Die Beiträge befassen sich sowohl mit den historischen Aufgaben der Institution „Militärrabbinat“ als auch mit den heutigen Erwartungen an die Militärseelsorge in einer modernen und im westlichen Bündnis verankerten Armee. Es werden die Rahmenbedingungen für ein umfassendes Engagement von jüdischen Militärgeistlichen skizziert, das den demokratischen, pluralen und liberalen Charakter der Bundeswehr stärken kann.

Mit Beiträgen von: Josef Schuster | Daniel Botmann | Mark Dainow | Ursula von der Leyen | Joachim Rühle | Rainer L. Glatz | Hans-Peter Bartels | Wolfgang Hellmich | Karl-Heinz Brunner | Hermann Gröhe | Reinhold Bartmann | Sigurd Rink | Menachem Sebbag | Gérald Rosenfeld | Michael Wolffsohn | Zsolt Balla | Boris Ronis | Thomas Sohst | Angelika Dörfler-Dierken | Sabine Hank und Hermann Simon

Herausgegeben von Daniel Botmann und Doron Kiesel für den Zentralrat der Juden in Deutschland
Date: 2019
Abstract: Wie denken, fühlen und kommunizieren Antisemiten im digitalen Zeitalter? Welche Rolle spielt das Internet bei der Verbreitung und Radikalisierung von Judenhass? Diese Fragen werden anhand von Beispielen aus dem Web 2.0 und auf der Basis einer umfassenden Studie im Buch anschaulich sowie präzise erläutert.


Weltweit nimmt die öffentliche Verbreitung von Antisemitismen über das Internet drastisch zu. Dabei zeigt sich, dass uralte judenfeindliche Stereotype sich mit aktuellen Konzeptualisierungen verbinden. Die Basis von Judenhass zeigt sich unabhängig von politischen, sozialen, ideologischen und ökonomischen Faktoren als ein kultureller Gefühlswert, der auf der Wahnvorstellung fußt, Juden seien das Übel in der Welt. Anhand zahlreicher Beispiele aus der Internet-Kommunikation erörtert Monika Schwarz-Friesel, dass sich zwar oberflächliche Formen und kommunikative Prozesse im digitalen Zeitalter verändern, der alte kollektive Hass gegenüber Juden jedoch ungebrochen die semantische Grundlage ist.

Dabei zeigt sich, dass Antisemitismus nicht bloß ein Vorurteilssystem ist, sondern ein auf Phantasmen basierendes Weltdeutungssystem, das über Sprachgebrauchsmuster ständig reproduziert wird und im kollektiven Bewusstsein lebendig bleibt. Auch die Erfahrung des Holocaust hat diese Tradition nicht gebrochen. Den aktuellen Antisemitismus und seine derzeit dominanten Manifestationen des Anti-Zionismus und Anti-Israelismus kann man daher nicht ohne seine kulturhistorische Dimension verstehen.