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Author(s): Duindam, David
Date: 2016
Abstract: This dissertation investigates the postwar development of the Hollandsche Schouwburg, an in situ Shoah memorial museum in Amsterdam, within the fields of memory, heritage and museum studies. During World War II, over forty-six thousand Jews were imprisoned in this former theater before being deported to the transit camps. In 1962, it became the first national Shoah memorial of the Netherlands and in 1993, a small exhibition was added. In the spring of 2016, the National Holocaust Museum opened, which consists of the Hollandsche Schouwburg and a new satellite space across the street.
This dissertation deals with the question how this site of painful heritage became an important memorial museum dedicated to the memory of the persecution of the Dutch Jews. I argue that this former theater was not a site of oblivion before 1962 but rather a material reminder of the persecution of the Jews which at that time was not an articulated part of the hegemonic memory discourse of the war in the Netherlands. The memorial was gradually appropriated by important Jewish institutions through the installment of Yom HaShoah, an educational exhibition and a wall of names. These are analyzed not by focusing on material authenticity, but instead a case is made for latent indexicality: visitors actively produce narratives by searching for traces of the past. This entails an ongoing creative process of meaning-making that allows sites of memory to expand and proliferate beyond their borders. An important question therefore is how the Hollandsche Schouwburg affects its direct surroundings.
Date: 2021
Abstract: Throughout 2021, JPR researchers Professor Sergio DellaPergola and Dr Daniel Staetsky analysed the responses of over 16,000 European Jews in 12 European countries who participated in the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights survey conducted by JPR and Ipsos in 2018. The result of their hard work and innovative approach is ‘The Jewish identities of European Jews’, a study into the what, why and how of Jewish identity.

The report finds some extraordinary differences and similarities between Jews across Europe, including:

European Jews are much more likely to see themselves as a religious minority than an ethnic one, yet fewer than half of all Jewish adults across Europe light candles most Friday nights;
Jewish identity is strongest in Belgium, the UK, France, Austria, Spain and Italy, and weakest in Hungary and Poland;
The memory of the Holocaust and combating antisemitism played a more important part in people’s Jewish identity than support for Israel, belief in God or charitable giving. Rising perceptions of antisemitism may have stimulated a stronger bond with Jewish peoplehood;
Only about half of all Jews in Europe identify with a particular denomination, although there are significant differences at the national level;
Higher proportions of younger Jews are religiously observant than older Jews;
Belgium has the largest proportion of Jews identifying as Orthodox in its Jewish population, followed by the UK, Italy, France and Austria;
Spain has the largest proportion of Jews identifying as Reform/Progressive, followed by Germany and the Netherlands;
Levels of attachment to the European Union among European Jews are higher than, or very similar to, levels of attachment among their fellow citizens in the countries in which they live
Author(s): Oztig, Lacin Idil
Date: 2022
Date: 2021
Abstract: The Fifth Survey of European Jewish Community Leaders and Professionals, 2021 presents the results of an online survey offered in 10 languages and administered to 1054 respondents in 31 countries. Conducted every three years using the same format, the survey seeks to identify trends and their evolution in time.

Even if European Jewish leaders and community professionals rank antisemitism and combatting it among their first concerns and priorities, they are similarly committed to expanding Jewish communities and fostering future sustainability by engaging more young people and unaffiliated Jews.

The survey covers a wide variety of topics including the toll of COVID-19 on European Jewish communities and a widening generational gap around pivotal issues. Conducted every three years since 2008, the study is part of JDC’s wider work in Europe, which includes its partnerships with local Jewish communities and programs aiding needy Jews, fostering Jewish life and leaders, resilience training.

The respondents were comprised of presidents and chairpersons of nationwide “umbrella organizations” or Federations; presidents and executive directors of private Jewish foundations, charities, and other privately funded initiatives; presidents and main representatives of Jewish communities that are organized at a city level; executive directors and programme coordinators, as well as current and former board members of Jewish organizations; among others.

The JDC International Centre for Community Development established the survey as a means to identify the priorities, sensibilities and concerns of Europe’s top Jewish leaders and professionals working in Jewish institutions, taking into account the changes that European Jewry has gone through since 1989, and the current political challenges and uncertainties in the continent. In a landscape with few mechanisms that can truly gauge these phenomena, the European Jewish Community Leaders Survey is an essential tool for analysis and applied research in the field of community development.
Date: 2021
Abstract: Many in Europe today are concerned about the rise in violence against Jews, which clearly raises fears in Jewish communities on the Continent. Neither Jewish communities nor individual Jews can be protected unless there is data on antisemitic incidents and scientifically thorough situation analysis. We need to know and analyze the current social attitudes related to antisemitism, to the coexistence with Jews, mutually held prejudices, related taboos in a representative sample of the European countries’ population.

This is the reason why we have launched the largest European antisemitism survey. The research, initiated by the Action and Protection League and carried out by the polling companies Ipsos and Inspira, aims to provide a comprehensive picture of antisemitic prejudice in 16 countries in the European Union.

Data were collected between December 2019 and January 2020 in 16 European countries: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom. 1000 people were surveyed in each country.

We used a total of 24 questions to measure antisemitism. We measured the cognitive and conative dimensions of prejudice with 10 questions, and three additional questions for the affective dimension of antisemitism, that is, to measure the emotional charge of antisemitic prejudice. We mapped secondary antisemitism relativizing the Holocaust with seven questions and antisemitic hostility against Israel with four questions. We used two and three questions, respectively, to measure sympathy for Jews and for Israel.

With the exception of questions about affective antisemitism, all questions were asked in the same form: Respondents were asked to indicate on a five-point scale how much they agreed with the statements in the question (strongly agree; tend to agree; neither agree nor disagree; tend to disagree; strongly disagree).
Date: 2021
Abstract: Many in Europe today are concerned about the rise in violence against Jews, which clearly raises fears in Jewish communities on the Continent. Neither Jewish communities nor individual Jews can be protected unless there is data on antisemitic incidents and scientifically thorough situation analysis. We need to know and analyze the current social attitudes related to antisemitism, to the coexistence with Jews, mutually held prejudices, related taboos in a representative sample of the European countries’ population.

This is the reason why we have launched the largest European antisemitism survey. The research, initiated by the Action and Protection League and carried out by the polling companies Ipsos and Inspira, aims to provide a comprehensive picture of antisemitic prejudice in 16 countries in the European Union.

Data were collected between December 2019 and January 2020 in 16 European countries: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom. 1000 people were surveyed in each country.

We used a total of 24 questions to measure antisemitism. We measured the cognitive and conative dimensions of prejudice with 10 questions, and three additional questions for the affective dimension of antisemitism, that is, to measure the emotional charge of antisemitic prejudice. We mapped secondary antisemitism relativizing the Holocaust with seven questions and antisemitic hostility against Israel with four questions. We used two and three questions, respectively, to measure sympathy for Jews and for Israel.

With the exception of questions about affective antisemitism, all questions were asked in the same form: Respondents were asked to indicate on a five-point scale how much they agreed with the statements in the question (strongly agree; tend to agree; neither agree nor disagree; tend to disagree; strongly disagree).
Date: 2020
Abstract: In the Netherlands, religions are often positioned as opposite to secular ideals of women’s freedom. While women’s emancipation supposedly grants women their autonomy, religions are suspected of reaffirming gender inequality. In this religion-versus-emancipation dilemma, questions of the body are pertinent, since traditional religions are framed as restricting and regulating women’s bodies. Questions about modesty, sexual relations, clothing and food preparations often come up in such debates. There seems to be a particular tension for women who convert to religions that are often regarded as ‘gender conservative’, and this chapter sheds light on that field of tension. This expands the field of women’s conversion – which has typically focused on Islamic women – by employing a comparative analysis of interviews and participant observation with Jewish, Christian and Muslim Dutch women converts. Joining a religion that one was not raised in is a process of ethical self-fashioning through training and disciplining of both the body and mind. Converts have to learn how to eat, how to pray, how to dress and how to have sex in such a way that it permits them to give shape to their religious subjectivity and pious desires. What I found is that performing authenticity is a central and embodied characteristic of modern-day conversion stories in the ‘age of authenticity’. This performance is often played out through the sexual and gendered body and religious subject transformations were closely related to sexual self-fashioning. In order to understand these links between conversion, sexuality and the body, I focus on experiences and ideas about virginity and marriage, menstruation and homosexuality. In this chapter, I aim to show that sexual embodiments and ethics cannot be understood as either religious or secular, but rather as a new form of religious subjectivity within Europe as a space where authenticity has become the most important mode for selfhood.
Date: 2021
Abstract: This article presents research notes on an oral history project on the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on Jews over the age of 65 years. During the first stage of the project, we conducted nearly 80 interviews in eight cities worldwide: Amsterdam, Berlin, London, Milan, New York, Paris, Rio de Janeiro, and St. Petersburg, and in Israel. The interviews were conducted in the spring of 2020 and reflect the atmosphere and perception of interviewees at the end of the first lockdown.

Based on an analysis of the interviews, the findings are divided into three spheres: (1) the personal experience during the pandemic, including personal difficulties and the impact of the lockdown on family and social contacts; (2) Jewish communal life, manifested in changed functions and emergence of new needs, as well as religious rituals during the pandemic; and (3) perceived relations between the Jewish community and wider society, including relations with state authorities and civil society, attitudes of and towards official media, and the possible impact of COVID-19 on antisemitism. Together, these spheres shed light on how elderly Jews experience their current situation under COVID-19—as individuals and as part of a community.

COVID-19 taught interviewees to reappraise what was important to them. They felt their family relations became stronger under the pandemic, and that their Jewish community was more meaningful than they had thought. They understood that online communication will continue to be present in all three spheres, but concluded that human contact cannot be substituted by technical devices.
Date: 2020
Abstract: This detailed and thorough report is rapidly becoming the ‘must-read’ study on European Jews, taking the reader on an extraordinary journey through one thousand years of European Jewish history before arriving at the most comprehensive analysis of European Jewish demography today.

Written by leading Jewish demographers Professor Sergio DellaPergola and Dr Daniel Staetsky, the Chair and Director of JPR’s European Jewish Demography Unit respectively, it explores how the European Jewish population has ebbed and flowed over time. It begins as far back as the twelfth century, travelling through many years of population stability, until the tremendous growth of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, followed by the dramatic decline prompted by a combination of mass migration and the horrors of the Shoah. Extraordinarily, after all this time, the proportion of world Jewry living in Europe today is almost identical to the proportion living in Europe 900 years ago.

Using multiple definitions of Jewishness and a vast array of sources to determine the size of the contemporary population, the study proceeds to measure it in multiple ways, looking at the major blocs of the European Union and the European countries of the Former Soviet Union, as well as providing country-by-country analyses, ranging from major centres such as France, the UK, Germany and Hungary, to tiny territories such as Gibraltar, Monaco and even the Holy See.

The report also contains the most up-to-date analysis we have on the key mechanisms of demographic change in Europe, touching variously on patterns of migration in and out of Europe, fertility, intermarriage, conversion and age compositions. While the report itself is a fascinating and important read, the underlying data are essential tools for the JPR team to utilise as it supports Jewish organisations across the continent to plan for the future.
Date: 2020
Date: 2013
Author(s): Verhoeven, Joram
Date: 2017
Date: 2014
Abstract: In de zomer van 2013 publiceerde Onderzoeksbureau Panteia in opdracht van de Anne Frank
Stichting het onderzoeksrapport ‘Antisemitisme in het Voortgezet Onderwijs’ (Wolf e.a., 2013). Dit
onderzoek gaf een kwantitatief (cijfermatig) beeld van de omvang en aard van dit probleem.
Uit dit onderzoek kwam naar voren dat een derde van de docenten het voorafgaande jaar
antisemitische incidenten had meegemaakt in de klas. Het ging veelal om ongerichte scheld- en
schreeuwpartijen. Daders waren meestal jongens en meestal autochtoon. Vaak was er sprake van
een voetbalcontext. Allochtone leerlingen waren, gerelateerd aan hun aandeel in de totale
leerlingpopulatie, relatief oververtegenwoordigd.
Dit heldere, maar tevens complexe beeld van uitingen van antisemitisme in het voortgezet onderwijs
gaf antwoord op een aantal vragen. Voor het eerst kon op basis van een representatief onderzoek een
goed inzicht gegeven worden over de globale aard en omvang van dit probleem. In de schriftelijke
vragenlijst is echter gebruik gemaakt van een aantal vooraf gedefinieerde globale categorieën, die de
respondenten konden aankruisen. Daardoor is weliswaar een helder beeld ontstaan, maar zijn er
geen details over achtergronden van daders, motieven en dergelijke beschikbaar. Om nadere details
van deze antisemitische incidenten te verkrijgen en voor meer inzicht in de achtergronden van
incidenten en daders is een aanvullende kwalitatieve schets gemaakt door onderzoekers van de Anne
Frank Stichting. In een eerste verkenning op dit thema zijn een aantal gesprekken gevoerd met
jongeren en met docenten over antisemitisme: Wat wordt er op scholen precies over of tegen Joden
geroepen? Waarom doen jongeren dat? En waar komt dat vandaan? Hoe zien de docenten de
uitlatingen van hun leerlingen? Hoe gaan docenten hiermee om?
In dit verslag geven we de uitkomsten van deze verkennende gesprekken weer. Vanwege de
kleinschalige opzet zijn deze uitkomsten niet te generaliseren. Daarbij benadrukken we dat, als
vervolg op de survey van Panteia, verder kwalitatief onderzoek nodig is om uitspraken te kunnen
doen. Zo zal de Anne Frank Stichting in 2014 uitgebreid onderzoek gaan doen naar domeinen waar
jongeren hun opvattingen hebben (aan)geleerd om zo beter de motieven voor antisemitische
uitlatingen te kunnen duiden.
Voorliggend rapport omvat een eerste verkenning om na te gaan wat er zoal speelt op school en wat
mogelijke achtergronden van antisemitische incidenten zijn
Date: 2018
Date: 2019
Abstract: De groei van antisemitisme in Nederland komt overeen met de trends in andere landen: ook in het Verenigd Koninkrijk, Frankrijk en Duitsland kwamen het afgelopen jaar vaker anti-Joodse incidenten voor.

Met name in de directe omgeving steeg het aantal antisemitische incidenten sterk. De stijging in deze categorie was 67 procent. Het gaat hier om voorvallen op school, op het werk of tussen buren. Juist deze incidenten hebben doorgaans een grote impact en zijn daardoor extra schrijnend. Zo registreerde CIDI een melding van een Joodse scholier, die in de klas en in groepsapps opmerkingen te horen krijgt als “alle Joden moeten dood” en “ga terug naar de gaskamer”. De school neemt pas na veel aandringen maatregelen en het pesten neemt pas af wanneer de leerling (op eigen verzoek) wordt overgeplaatst naar een andere klas.

De door CIDI geregistreerde incidenten vormen hoogstwaarschijnlijk het topje van de antisemitische ijsberg in Nederland. Onderzoek door het Fundamentele Rechtenagentschap van de EU geeft aan dat slechts 25 procent van de Joodse Nederlanders, die de afgelopen vijf jaar slachtoffer werden van antisemitisme, hun ervaring meldde bij een instantie (zoals CIDI) of aangifte deed bij de politie. Veel antisemitisme speelt zich dus af onder de radar.

CIDI maakt zich zorgen over de toename van antisemitisme en wil een duidelijk actieplan van de overheid om dit probleem te bestrijden. Het is hoog tijd dat politie en justitie specifiek aandacht besteden aan antisemitisme en het probleem goed in kaart brengen. Ook moet worden geïnvesteerd in opsporing en vervolging van daders – nu is het zo dat slachtoffers na een aangifte soms jaren wachten voordat er vervolging plaatsvindt. Steeds meer mensen denken dat melden of aangifte doen geen zin heeft. Antisemitisme dreigt hierdoor steeds verder onder de radar te verdwijnen. Deze zorgwekkende trend kan alleen worden gekeerd wanneer de overheid met een serieuze, transparante en krachtdadige aanpak van het probleem komt.

De aanpak van antisemitisme kan echter niet beperkt blijven tot politie en justitie. CIDI wil dat docenten ondersteuning krijgen bij het bestrijden van antisemitische vooroordelen en complottheorieën in de klas. Inburgeringstrajecten voor nieuwe Nederlanders moeten aandacht besteden aan antisemitisme en benadrukken dat rechten van minderheden in Nederland worden gerespecteerd. En wanneer antisemitisme zich voordoet – op straat, op school, op internet – is het belangrijk dat men zich er duidelijk tegen uitspreekt. We mogen antisemitisme niet normaal gaan vinden.
Date: 2014
Date: 2015