Search results

Your search found 21 items
Sort: Relevance | Topics | Title | Author | Publication Year
Home  / Search Results
Author(s): Gershenson, Olga
Date: 2015
Abstract: In 2012, a new Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center opened in Moscow – an event unthinkable during the Soviet regime. Financed at the level of $50 million, created by an international crew of academics and museum designers, and located in a landmark building, the museum immediately rose to a position of cultural prominence in the Russian museum scene. Using interactive technology and multimedia, the museum's core exhibition presents several centuries of complex local Jewish history, including the Second World War period. Naturally, the Holocaust is an important part of the story. Olga Gershenson's essay analyzes the museum's relationship to Holocaust history and memory in the post-Soviet context. She describes the museum's struggle to reconcile a Soviet understanding of the “Great Patriotic War” with a dominant Western narrative of the Holocaust, while also bringing the Holocaust in the Soviet Union to a broader audience via the museum. Through recorded testimonies, period documents, and film, the museum's display narrates the events of the Holocaust on Soviet soil. This is a significant revision of the Soviet-era discourse, which universalized and externalized the Holocaust. But this important revision is limited by the museum's choice to avoid the subject of local collaborators and bystanders. The museum shies away from the most pernicious aspect of the Holocaust history on Soviet soil, missing an opportunity to take historic responsibility and confront the difficult past.
Date: 2002
Abstract: Contents:
Introduction
Drs. Hans Vuijsje, Director Jewish Social Service
The Netherlands
Welcome words
Mr. Abraham Lehrer, Chairman ZWST Germany
Opening words
Mr. Gabriel Taus, Former Director ECJC
Overview of social demographic changes in the Jewish communities
throughout Europe
Prof. Barry Kosmin, Executive Director, Institute for Jewish Policy Research, London
The influence of migration on a Jewish community from a multicultural perspective
Prof. David Pinto, Multicultural Communication, University of Amsterdam
The Dutch method for building new communities,
Identity strengthening as a way towards integration into a new community
Dr. Hans Vuijsje, Director Jewish Social Service, The Netherlands
The changing Jewish community in Spain
Dr. Mario Izcovich, Coordinator of PAN European Affairs, JDC Paris
The changing Jewish community in Germany
Mrs. Paulette Weber, staff member, ZWST Germany
The changing Jewish community in Germany viewed from Moscow and
an overview of the Jewish community in Moscow
Rabbi Pinchas Goldschmidt, Chief Rabbi of Moscow
Hesed models of community organization and adaptation of charity
to community changes
Mr. Leonid Kolton, Director, Hesed Avraham Charity, St. Petersburg
The implementation of community development concepts during
the buildup phase of viable new communities
Mrs. Nicolienne Wolf, Head, Community Development Department,
Jewish Social Services, The Netherlands
Summary and conclusions
• Dr. Hans Vuijsje, Director, Jewish Social Services, The Netherlands
• Prof. David Pinto, Multicultural Communication, University of Amsterdam
Closing words
Mr. Beni Bloch, Director, ZWST Germany
Author(s): Goluboff, Sascha L.
Date: 2002
Abstract: The prevalence of anti-Semitism in Russia is well known, but the issue of race within the Jewish community has rarely been discussed explicitly. Combining ethnography with archival research, Jewish Russians: Upheavals in a Moscow Synagogue documents the changing face of the historically dominant Russian Jewish community in the mid-1990s. Sascha Goluboff focuses on a Moscow synagogue, now comprising individuals from radically different cultures and backgrounds, as a nexus from which to explore issues of identity creation and negotiation. Following the rapid rise of this transnational congregation—headed by a Western rabbi and consisting of Jews from Georgia and the mountains of Azerbaijan and Dagestan, along with Bukharan Jews from Central Asia—she evaluates the process that created this diverse gathering and offers an intimate sense of individual interactions in the context of the synagogue's congregation.

Challenging earlier research claims that Russian and Jewish identities are mutually exclusive, Goluboff illustrates how post-Soviet Jews use Russian and Jewish ethnic labels and racial categories to describe themselves. Jews at the synagogue were constantly engaged in often contradictory but always culturally meaningful processes of identity formation. Ambivalent about emerging class distinctions, Georgian, Russian, Mountain, and Bukharan Jews evaluated one another based on each group's supposed success or failure in the new market economy. Goluboff argues that post-Soviet Jewry is based on perceived racial, class, and ethnic differences as they emerge within discourses of belonging to the Jewish people and the new Russian nation.