Search results

Your search found 15 items
Sort: Relevance | Topics | Title | Author | Publication Year
Home  / Search Results
Author(s): Kosmin, Barry A.
Date: 2018
Abstract: The Fourth Survey of European Jewish Community Leaders and Professionals, 2018 presents the results of an online survey offered in 10 languages and administered to 893 respondents in 29 countries. Conducted every three years using the same format, the survey seeks to identify trends and their evolution in time. The survey asked Jewish lay leaders and community professionals questions regarding future community priorities, identifying the main threats to Jewish life, views on the safety and security situation in their cities, including emergency preparedness, and opinions on an array of internal community issues. Examples include conversions, membership criteria policies on intermarriage, and their vision of Europe and Israel. The respondents were comprised of presidents and chairpersons of nationwide “umbrella organizations” or Federations; presidents and executive directors of private Jewish foundations, charities, and other privately funded initiatives; presidents and main representatives of Jewish communities that are organized at a city level; executive directors and programme coordinators, as well as current and former board members of Jewish organizations; among others. The JDC International Centre for Community Development established the survey as a means to identify the priorities, sensibilities and concerns of Europe’s top Jewish leaders and professionals working in Jewish institutions, taking into account the changes that European Jewry has gone through since 1989, and the current political challenges and uncertainties in the continent. In a landscape with few mechanisms that can truly gauge these phenomena, the European Jewish Community Leaders Survey is an essential tool for analysis and applied research in the field of community development. The Survey team was directed by Dr. Barry Kosmin (Trinity College), who has conducted several large national social surveys and opinion polls in Europe, Africa and the U.S., including the CJF 1990 US National Jewish Population Survey.
Author(s): Kosmin, Barry A.
Date: 2016
Abstract: Launched by the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee’s International Centre for Community Development (JDC-ICCD), and conducted by a research team at Trinity College (Hartford, Connecticut, USA) between June and August 2015, the Third Survey of European Jewish Leaders and Opinion Formers presents the results of an online survey administered to 314 respondents in 29 countries. The survey was conducted online in five languages: English, French, Spanish, German and Hungarian. The Survey of European Jewish Leaders and Opinion Formers is conducted every three or four years using the same format, in order to identify trends and their evolution. Findings of the 2015 edition were assessed and evaluated based on the results of previous surveys (2008 and 2011). The survey posed Jewish leaders and opinion formers a range of questions about major challenges and issues that
concern European Jewish communities in 2015, and about their expectations of how communities will evolve over the next 5-10 years. The 45 questions (see Appendix) dealt
with topics that relate to internal community structures and their functions, as well as the external environment affecting communities. The questionnaire also included six open-ended questions in a choice of five languages. These answers form the basis of the qualitative analysis of the report. The questions were organized under the following headings:• Vision & Change (6 questions)
• Decision-Making & Control (1 question)
• Lay Leadership (1 question)
• Professional Leadership (2 questions)
• Status Issues & Intermarriage (5 questions)
• Organizational Frameworks (2 questions)
• Community Causes (2 questions)
• Jewish Education (1 question)
• Funding (3 questions)
• Communal Tensions (3 questions)
• Anti-Semitism/Security (5 questions)
• Europe (1 question)
• Israel (1 question)
• Future (2 questions)
• Personal Profile (9 questions)
Date: 2014
Abstract: Whereas there is already quite a significant bibliography focusing on the experiences of intermarried couples in Europe, less attention has been paid to their children. This study, along with parallel studies in Germany and France, suggest that the road to "assimilation" is not as linear and inevitable as it was thought to be; that the children of mixed couples never quite disconnect from Judaism, much on the contrary, Judaism is widely recognized to be an element of their identity. A second important finding is the capital role that the families and the Jewish institutions play in the formation of a positive Jewish identity among the children of intermarriage. Those who grow up in a Jewish household or who have been affiliated with Jewish institutions tend to develop stronger Jewish identities. Last but not least, far from being a "passive" population, most of the interviewees that want to be connected to Judaism show a very active attitude towards the search for a suitable Jewish environment, one that can assure them both legitimacy and acceptance.

Intermarriage within the Dutch Jewish community is on the rise. The numbers speak for themselves: out of the 52,000 Jews residing in the Netherlands 25% just have a Jewish mother and 30% a Jewish father. 50 in-depth interviews were conducted with individuals between the ages of 20 and 40 who have one Jewish parent and have different levels of community involvement. All respondents identify with Judaism in some way. How people connect to Judaism varies from person to person. Most people feel Jewish although their level of Judaism depends on their personal situation. There is a small group that feels Jewish in every situation and another group that only has a minimal connection to Judaism (mostly holding on to memories of the Shoah passed on by their parents and grandparents). Many individuals feel (strongly) connected to Judaism but do not practice Judaism in their daily lives.
Author(s): Bernstein, Julia
Date: 2014
Abstract: Whereas there is already quite a significant bibliography focusing on the experiences of intermarried couples in Europe, less attention has been paid to their children. This study, along with parallel studies in France and the Netherlands, suggest that the road to "assimilation" is not as linear and inevitable as it was thought to be; that the children of mixed couples never quite disconnect from Judaism, much on the contrary, Judaism is widely recognized to be an element of their identity. A second important finding is the capital role that the families and the Jewish institutions play in the formation of a positive Jewish identity among the children of intermarriage. Those who grow up in a Jewish household or who have been affiliated with Jewish institutions tend to develop stronger Jewish identities. Last but not least, far from being a "passive" population, most of the interviewees that want to be connected to Judaism show a very active attitude towards the search for a suitable Jewish environment, one that can assure them both legitimacy and acceptance.

For the purpose of this study, 45 individuals from various cities and towns in Germany were interviewed. 26 of the interviewees had Jewish forebears on their mother's side and 19 on their father's side. 23 had migrated out of which 21 came from the former Soviet Union. Among participants born in Germany, German history represents a unique context for mixed Christian-German/Jewish-German couples. On one hand, many participants found it difficult to reconcile what they perceive as conflicting German and Jewish narratives, often leading to conflicts of loyalty. Moreover, some relate to experiences of antisemitism coming from within their extended families. Also, German as a language contains words heavily loaded with Nazi significance. On the other side, the non-Jewish German parents of the interviewees are generally described as sensitive, making real efforts to support the Jewish parents by celebrating Jewish holidays, visiting Israel, learning Hebrew, playing a part in the community, and demonstrating initiative, for instance, by organizing trips to Israel or Jewish events, or reading books about the conflict in the Middle East.