Search results

Your search found 62 items
Previous | Next
Sort: Relevance | Topics | Title | Author | Publication Year View all 1 2
Home  / Search Results
Date: 2017
Author(s): Alexander, Philip
Date: 2016
Abstract: This research offers an original contribution to the study of contemporary klezmer
music by analysing it in relation to a particular urban environment. With its origins in a
largely destroyed Eastern European Jewish culture, contemporary klezmer is both
historically-grounded and paradoxically rootless, cut loose from geographical
specificity by the internationalism of its recent revival. Seeking to counteract the
music’s modern placeless-ness, this dissertation analyses the musical and spatial means
by which klezmer has been re-rooted in the distinctive material and symbolic conditions
of today’s Berlin. The theoretical framework takes in questions of cultural identity,
music and place, authenticities of tradition and instrumental practice, to show how this
transnational and syncretic music – with few historical ties to Berlin – can be
understood in relation to the city’s particular post-reunification bricolage aesthetic and
subversively creative everyday tactics. Beginning by mapping the criss-crossing
networks of musicians and their multiple artistic perspectives, the dissertation proceeds
through an exploration of the official and unofficial spaces within which these fluid
musical practices operate, leading onto ways that the city of Berlin is made manifest in
the music itself – how the city is interpellated sonically and textually. Processes of
musical transmission and education are analysed through the filters of tradition and
pedagogical ideologies, from which my own instrument, the piano accordion, is used as
a lens through which to uncover the balance between personal expression and
historically-informed performance. The final chapter looks at the relationship between
history, Jewish identity and music in the city. It explores the resonances between the
contested discourse of memorial and present-day cultural and musical production,
discovering how at times sound and music can act as a living sonic embodiment that
speaks against the silence of historical memory
Date: 2008
Author(s): Amit, Hila
Date: 2017
Abstract: Looking at different perspectives and practices regarding Hebrew’s use or place of use, this chapter seeks to find connections between perceptions of diasporic Hebrew as they are envisioned and practiced in contemporary Berlin. What are the various events and activities taking place with regards to Hebrew in contemporary Berlin? How do Hebrew texts written today in Berlin correspond to the work of Scholem, Rosenzweig and others? Who are the people behind these activities and texts, and what is the political significance of their activities?

The article will open with a description of important notions of Zionist ideology. Then, I will describe briefly main aspects relevant to Israeli emigration. I will explain the importance of the city of Berlin to the Hebrew culture starting from the 18th century, as well as a Zionist center in the first half of the 20st century. The last two sections of this article will explore two figures of Israeli emigrants and their activities in contemporary Berlin. I will follow the activist Tal Hever-Chybowski, who claims to have established the first literary journal to be published in Hebrew in Europe since 1944 (entitled: Mikan Va'eilah - “from here and onwards”). Hever- Chybowski describes his motivation in the following words: “The goal of the journal is to become a literary cultural platform for non-hegemonic and non-sovereign Hebrew, a Hebrew that is free from the shackles of nationality and territory.” I say “claim to have established,” because this journal is not yet published, even though Hever-Chybowski describes it as if it is.

I will also follow the work of Mati Shemoeluf, a Hebrew author working in Berlin, who described the wonders of a Hebrew Library in Berlin. Shemoeluf, just like Hever-Chybowski, can be criticized for his embellishments of reality, since the Hebrew library – at least as Shemoeluf describes it - does not really exist. What are their political motivations, and what form of political activity are they practicing, are the questions I address in this chapter.
Author(s): Laguerre, Michel S.
Date: 2008
Abstract: Global Neighborhoods analyzes the organization of everyday life and the social integration of contemporary Jewish neighborhoods in Paris, London, and Berlin. Concentrating on the post-Holocaust era, Michel S. Laguerre explains how each urban diasporic site has followed a different path of development influenced by the local milieu in which it is incorporated. He also considers how technology has enabled extraterritorial relations with Israel and other diasporic enclaves inside and outside the hostland.

Shifting the frame of reference from assimilation theory to globalization theory and the information technology revolution, Laguerre argues that Jewish neighborhoods are not simply transnational social formations, but are fundamentally transglobal entities. Connected to multiple overseas diasporic sites, their interactions reach beyond their homelands, and they develop the logic of their social interactions inside this larger network of relationships. As with all transglobal communities, there is constant movement of people, goods, communications, ideas, images, and capital that sustains and adds vibrancy to everyday life. Since all are connected through the network, Laguerre contends that the variable shape of the local is affected by and affects the global.

Table of Contents

List of Figures, Tables, and Maps
Preface
Acknowledgments
1. Neighborhood Globalization

2. Paris’s Jewish Quarter: Unmade, Remade, and Transformed

3. Berlin’s Jewish Quarter: The Local History of the Global

4. London’s Jewish Neighborhoods: Nodes of Global Networks

5. Residential Districts Versus Business Districts

6. The Jewish Quarter as a Global Chronopolis

7. Paris’s City Hall and the Jewish Quarter

8. Heritage Tourism: The Jewish Quarter as a Theme Park

9. The Jewish Quarter, Other Diasporic Sites, and Israel

10. Information Technology and the Jewish Neighborhood

11. Neighborhoods of Globalization

Conclusion: Global Neighborhoods in the Global Metropolis

Notes
References
Index
Author(s): Shternshis, Anna
Date: 2011
Abstract: In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:
A few days after arriving in New York during the spring of 1990, Anatolii S. (born in 1920, Ukraine), put on his jacket, decorated with the numerous military medals that he had earned during his service in the Soviet Army during World War II, and went into a nearby synagogue, hoping to find out about the benefits available to him as a Jewish veteran of the war that "helped to save America from fascism." He showed his documents to the local clerk, who only gestured for him to put his hat back on and to pray with the prayer book. Unable to open the book correctly, and most importantly, unwilling to pray, Anatolii realized that neither his participation in the war, nor his knowledge of Yiddish, made him a true member of this community. Being accustomed to displays of public respect and economic benefits from his status as a war veteran, Anatolii now had to embrace his new status in a society that did not regard him any differently from any other non-English speaking, elderly Jewish immigrant from Russia.

Anatolii, like the other approximately 26,000 Soviet Jewish veterans who migrated to Germany, Israel, Canada, and the United States in the 1990s, was certainly welcome to attend synagogues and Jewish community centers in his new country, but his understanding of what it meant to be a Jew differed profoundly from the majority of members in these communities. Anatolii and his peers (Soviet veterans) regarded their participation in the war as the most important part of their Jewish identity, and they were often shocked to find out how little the war meant to the Jewish identity of the local populations they encountered. Unsatisfied with the status quo, many Soviet veterans launched their own organizations, where being Jewish and proud of Soviet accomplishments did not seem contradictory. Moreover, the definitions of "Soviet" and "Jewish" shifted, merged, and eventually formed the foundation of a specific culture, with its own leaders, traditions, rituals, and language.

In this article, I look into the modes of survival of Soviet language and ideology among veterans, and analyze what these modes tell us about the patterns of immigrant adaptation. I concentrate on three centers of veterans' activities: New York, Toronto, and Berlin, and discuss similarities and differences in the adaptations of veterans in these communities. I will discuss how the culture of each city and country influenced what the veterans select from Soviet rhetoric to describe their present lives.

The second goal of this study is to challenge existing scholarship, which treats elderly migrants as passive and apathetic. Nursing Studies and Gerontology dominate research in this area (rather than the field of immigrant studies) and as a result we know much more about cases of extreme isolation, deprivation, and depression among elderly immigrants in the United States, Canada, Australia, and Western Europe than about the contribution elderly migrants make to the social and cultural systems in their new societies. While the vulnerability of this group is undeniable, I perceive studying foreign retirees solely as victims or disadvantaged entities as an "ageism" bias which denies proper recognition and acceptance of the achievements and life experiences of the elderly, as it sees them solely through the prism of their ailing bodies. Soviet Jewish veterans, as a group, serve as an ideal case study of how elderly immigrants fight such perceptions, both consciously and subconsciously, not only by creating their own organizations, but also by establishing an awareness of their legacies in their new home countries.

Data and Methodology
This study is based on 233 in-depth interviews with Soviet veterans of World War II conducted between 1999 and 2007 in Toronto, Berlin, and New York. I used a snowball sample, where the initial respondents—located through veterans' organizations and ads placed in Russian-language media—suggested other potential interviewees. The interviews consisted of open-ended questions about respondents' experiences throughout their lives. Russian-language newspaper articles published in immigrant papers also served as useful sources for public expressions of veterans' opinions about political, cultural, and social issues in their new countries.
Author(s): Nathenson, Cary
Date: 2013
Abstract: In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:
In the mid-1940s, a little girl on the South Side of Chicago really, really wanted a Christmas tree. This commonplace request was complicated by just one thing: the girl, like most of her neighbors, was Jewish. The temper tantrum must have been ferocious, because the girl somehow got her mother to give in. A tree was procured and smuggled down the alley into the apartment, lest the neighbors get wind of the shande. The girl enjoyed her Christmas tree, alongside her Hanukkah menorah, until one day she developed a fever, and the tree was hastily stuffed into a closet before the pediatrician, Dr. Rosen-bloom, arrived.

The stress of this secret Christmas was ultimately too much bother, so this would be my mother’s one and only “Chrismukkah” celebration. Of course, she didn’t know to call it that, nor did she know that craving a Christmas tree placed her on a historical continuum with her German-Jewish ancestors, some of whom might have celebrated the hybrid holiday called “Weihnukka” (from Weihnachten, German for “Christmas.”) Weihnukka was not an actual holiday but referred instead to the practice of some assimilated—but not converted—Jews who adopted Christmas rituals in the private sphere. In some German-Jewish bourgeois homes of the Wilhelmine era, trees, advent calendars, wreaths and other, mostly superficial trappings of the holiday co-existed, if not usurped, the rituals of Judaism’s winter holiday, Hanukkah. To the extent the term was used at all, Weihnukka was probably mostly heard mockingly by Jews who were embarrassed by this behavior.1 The Christmas these Jews celebrated was less about the birth of Jesus Christ than it was about fitting in with neighbors. Christmas was widely seen as belonging to and defining of the German nation rather than a religious festival, and therefore celebrating the holiday was just something that “real” Germans did, regardless of their religion. While some German-Jews no doubt experienced feelings of embarrassment, even shame, at assimilating Christmas into their family traditions, others achieved what was certainly the main objective: a sense of normalcy as Germans while maintaining self-identification as Jewish.

For one assimilated Jewish-German child, Christmas was so fully part of his normal family life that the tree in the gute Stube appeared without question each December. It was only after National Socialist racial laws required him to attend special Jewish-only schools that he learned that Jews actually celebrate Hanukkah, not Christmas. Not coincidentally, these are the recollections of Michael Blumenthal, a Jew from Oranienburg, just north of Berlin, who would escape fascism and later became Treasury Secretary under U.S. President Jimmy Carter and who now heads the Jewish Museum Berlin.2 The cultural-historical oddity of German-Jewish Christmas celebrations was the subject of a temporary exhibit at the museum. The show, titled “Weihnukka: Geschichten von Weihnachten und Chanukka” (Chrismukkah: Stories of Christmas and Hanukkah), was on display from October 2005 to January 2006. Now, even several years later, it is apparent that the Weihnukka show can be read as a significant moment along a line of the continuity and discontinuity of Jewish, German, and “Jewish-German” identity.

The exhibit mostly featured artifacts and texts documenting nineteenth-and early-twentieth- century holiday practices, explaining Hanukkah for non-Jewish museum visitors, and casting Christmas as a celebration in the German-nationalist context of the era.3 While the fraught navigation of Jewish-German identity in Gründerzeit Germany is at the core of the exhibit, what captured my attention were the elements of contemporary American popular culture used to conclude the show. The museum administration contends that they were included merely to bring this cultural history up to date for visitors.4 This was no doubt their intention, and yet I will argue that these American aspects of the Weihnukka exhibit have important functions and meanings beyond the superficial level of visitor experience. I look back, then, at this exhibit, in order to interrogate its implications for global identity and even the traditional idea of diaspora in the context of today’s German-Jewish community, and what this temporary exhibit tells us about the ongoing function of the Jewish Museum Berlin...
Date: 2009
Abstract: TABLE OF CONTENTS
7 Jacek Purchla, "A world after a Catastrophe" - in search of lost memory

Witnesses in the space of memory

13 Miriam Akavia, A world before a Catastrophe. My Krakow family between the wars
21 Leopold Unger, From the "last hope" to the "last exodus"
29 Yevsei Handel, Minsk: non-revitalisation ofJewish districts and possible reasons
43 Janusz Makuch, The Jewish Culture Festival: between two worlds

Jewish heritage - dilemmas of regained memory

53 Michal Firestone, The conservation ofJewish cultural heritage as a tool for the investigation of identity
63 Ruth Ellen Gruber, Beyond virtually Jewish... balancing the real, the surreal and real imaginary places
81 Sandra Lustig, Alternatives to "Jewish Disneyland." Some approaches to Jewish history in European cities and towns
99 Magdalena Waligorska, Spotlight on the unseen: the rediscovery of little Jerusalems
117 Agnieszka Sabor, In search of identity

Jewish heritage in Central European metropolises

123 Andreas Wilke, The Spandauer Vorstadt in Berlin.15 years of urban regeneration
139 Martha Keil, A clash of times. Jewish sites in Vienna (Judenplatz, Seitenstettengasse, Tempelgasse)
163 Krisztina Keresztely, Wasting memories -gentrification vs. urban values in the Jewish neighbourhood ofBudapest
181 Arno Pah'k, The struggle to protect the monuments of Prague's Jewish Town
215 Jaroslav Klenovsky, Jewish Brno
247 Sarunas Lields, The revitalisation of Jewish heritage in Vilnius

Approaches of Polish towns and cities to the problems of revitalising Jewish cultural heritage
263 Bogustaw Szmygin, Can a world which has ceased to exist be protected? The Jewish district in Lublin
287 Eleonora Bergman, The "Northern District" in Warsaw:a city within a city?
301 Jacek Wesoiowski, The Jewish heritage in the urban space of todz - a question ofpresence
325 Agnieszka Zabtocka-Kos, In search of new ideas. Wroclaw's "Jewish district" - yesterday and today
343 Adam Bartosz, This was the Tarnow shtetl
363 Monika Murzyn-Kupisz, Reclaiming memory or mass consumption? Dilemmas in rediscovering Jewish heritage ofKrakow's Kazimierz
Date: 2013
Date: 2001
Abstract: [From http://www.leo-baeck.org/leobaeck/sachbuchallgemein/buch-00905.html]:

Hebräisch in Metropolis
Die Historikerin Fania Oz-Salzberger über die israelische Diaspora in Berlin

"Wie lebt es sich als Israeli in Berlin?" Allein diese Frage, die die israelische Historikerin Fania Oz-Salzberger direkt zu Anfang ihres Buches stellt, führt zu einiger Verwirrung und in ein "Labyrinth voller Rätsel und Unwägbarkeiten."

Die Autorin meint explizit Israelis, nicht etwa deutsche Juden in Berlin. Damit hat sie schon ein erstes Tabu berührt. Denn in Israel selbst wird die Existenz einer israelischen Diaspora geflissentlich übersehen oder gar verneint. Als ob es die vielen hunderttausend Israelis in New York oder Los Angeles nicht geben würde. Nimmt man sie dennoch zur Kenntnis, fallen unschöne Wörter wie "Deserteure" und "Aussteiger". Und jetzt soll sich auch noch Berlin in die Reihe dieser Diaspora-Orte einreihen, wo Israelis mittlerweile zu Tausenden leben? Ausgerechnet die Stadt, in der die Vernichtung des jüdischen Volkes geplant wurde?
Fania Oz-Salzberger selbst hat im Rahmen eines Wissenschaftskollegs ein Jahr in Berlin gelebt und sich in dieser Zeit mit vielen Israelis darüber unterhalten, warum sie ihre Zelte gerade hier aufgeschlagen haben. Die Gründe sind so verschieden wie die Menschen, mit denen sie sprach: Mal war es Liebe, mal waren es berufliche Gründe oder aber die Möglichkeit, an einer der vielen Hochschulen zu studieren. Doch alle berichten einhellig: Berlin läßt niemanden, der in Israel geboren und aufgewachsen ist, kalt.
So mancher stieß hier unerwartet auf familiäre Wurzeln, wie etwa Dorit Brandwein-Stürmer, die israelische Gattin des deutschen Historikers und Ex-Kanzlerberater Michael Stürmer. Oft waren diese Begegnungen mit der Vergangenheit auch recht schmerzhaft, wie bei einem israelischen Banker, der sich auf die Suche nach den Akten über die Deportation seiner Vorfahren machte. Und in den Gesprächen wird eines deutlich: Die Vergangenheit Berlins als Hauptstadt Nazi-Deutschlands kommt in der Wahrnehmung ihrer neuen Wahlheimat bei allen Israelis immer wieder zum Vorschein. Daran können weder die gewonnene Vertrautheit mit der neuen Umgebung oder aber die vielschichtigen engen Bindungen zu ihren Bewohnern etwas ändern. Die oftmals beschworene Normalität deutsch-israelischer Beziehungen bleibt das Wunschdenken der deutschen Seite. "So macht die deutsche Sprache diskriminierende Unterschiede zwischen Israelis und Deutschen. Uns versetzt sie einen Schlag, den Deutschen nicht. Sie wissen nicht, was uns die Worte 'raus' und 'aussteigen', 'Arbeit' und 'frei', 'schnell, schnell' und 'Achtung' antun."
Fania Oz-Salzbergers Buch ist aber weit mehr als nur eine Bestandsaufnahme der israelischen Lebenswelten im Berlin von heute. Es ist zugleich ein äußerst persönliche Züge tragender Annäherungsversuch an die Stadt, an den historischen und ganz realen Ort: Berlin, das war für sie in ihrer Kindheit der Schauplatz von Emil und die Detektive oder Pünktchen und Anton. Damit spricht sie stellvertretend für eine ganze Generation von Israelis, denn die Kindergeschichten Erich Kästners erfreuten sich auch im Israel der fünfziger und sechziger Jahre große Beliebtheit. Und: Berlin galt als Inbegriff der architektonischen Moderne, die nach 1933 ihre konsequente Fortsetzung in den städtebaulichen Konzeptionen Tel Avivs oder Haifas erlebte.
Was den Leser bei der Lektüre des Buches überraschen mag, ist die Tatsache, daß das Phänomen "Israelis in Berlin" älter ist, als der Staat Israel selbst. Schon vor dem Ersten Weltkrieg tauchten in den assimilierten, gut bürgerlichen jüdischen Haushalten in Berlin hebräisch sprechende Kindermädchen aus Eretz-Israel auf. Und die gesamte Prominenz hebräisch schreibender Literaten, angefangen von Chaim Nachman Bialik über Achad Ha'am oder Saul Tschernichowski, weilte für längere Zeit in der deutschen Hauptstadt und hinterließ hier ihre Spuren. Die Route Berlin - Tel Aviv, Haifa, Jerusalem war keine Einbahnstraße.
Auf den ersten Blick scheint Israelis in Berlin ausschließlich für ein israelisches Publikum geschrieben zu sein. Die Fragen nach der israelischen Identität, der Existenz als Israeli im Ausland, all das und vieles mehr stehen an zentraler Stelle. Doch gleich einer Archäologin gelingt es Fania Oz-Salzberger dank ihrer Wahrnehmung und Beschäftigung mit Berlin, die für einen deutschen Leser vielleicht verborgenen Schichten der Stadt freizulegen und ihm dadurch einen neuen und ungewöhnlichen Zugang zu vermitteln. Zudem zeigen ihre Geschichten einmal mehr, wie komplex das deutsch-israelische respektive deutsch-jüdische Verhältnis in Wirklichkeit ist.

von Ralf Balke
Author(s): Dörre, Andrei
Date: 2004
Abstract: „Berlin. Ostbahnhof Europas“ lautet ein vor wenigen Jahren erschienenes Buch Karl SCHLÖGELs. Es greift damit bereits in seinem Titel ein bemerkenswertes Phänomen auf, das nicht erst nach der Osterweiterung der Europäischen Union am 01. Mai 2004 zu beobachten ist. Im städtischen Straßenbild, in den Verkehrsmitteln des ÖPNV, in Einrichtungen des Einzelhandels und des Dienstleistungssektors sowie im kulturellen Leben die Präsenz einer Vielzahl osteuropäische Sprachen sprechender Menschen unüberhörbar.
Bei den Russischsprechenden sind es SpätaussiedlerInnen und jüdische ZuwandererInnen, Au-Pairs, Studierende und Geschäftsleute, zugereiste Ehepartner und KünstlerInnen. Aber auch Flüchtlinge und AsylbewerberInnen aus Krisengebieten stellen einen Teil der russischsprachigen Bevölkerung Berlins dar. Mit diesem Phänomen unmittelbar verwoben scheint besonders das Wachstum der jüdischen Bevölkerung Berlins, die sich vor allem seit der Zuwanderung aus den Nachfolgestaaten der Sowjetunion beständig vergrößert.
Internationale Migration als ein zentrales Forschungsfeld der Bevölkerungsgeographie findet im Falle der jüdischen Zuwanderung verstärkt seit 1990 tagtäglich statt. Auswirkungen der Migrationen hinterlassen sowohl auf der Seite der MigrantInnen als auch auf der Seite der bundesdeutschen Gesellschaft Spuren. Denn im Reisegepäck der Zugewanderten befinden sich nicht nur materielle Gegenstände. Ihr ebenfalls mitgebrachtes Wissen, kulturelle Prägungen, Normvorstellungen, raumübergreifenden Beziehungen und Werte bilden die Voraussetzungen für eigenes kreatives Handeln und werden in die hiesige Gesellschaft eingebracht und gelebt. Entgegengesetzt wirken sich die neuen sozialen Lebensumstände und Anforderungen auf das Leben der Zugewanderten aus.
Diese Arbeit widmet sich der Analyse individuell konstruierter Lebenswelten jüdischer ZuwandererInnen. Als Dreh- und Angelpunkt der Erforschung transnationaler sozialer Lebenswelten fungierte das Konzept des Transnationalismus, das an gegebener Stelle vorgestellt wird. Daran anknüpfend steht die zentrale, offen gehaltene Fragestellung: Welche Dimensionen haben diese transnationalen sozialen Lebenswelten, wie werden sie konstruiert und welche Faktoren beeinflussen ihre Herausbildung?
Als Projektionsfläche und Hintergrundinformation zur zentralen Fragestellung wird zunächst die quantitative Entwicklung der jüdischen Auswanderung aus der UdSSR und ihren Nachfolgestaaten seit dem Ende der 1980er Jahre skizziert. Die seit 1990 anhaltende russisch-jüdische Migration in die BRD wird nachgezeichnet. Dabei werden einführend die rechtlichen Zuwanderungstore dargestellt sowie statistisches Datenmaterial einbezogen. Um spezifische Informationen zur Lage in Berlin zu erhalten, wurden ExpertInneneninterviews mit VertreterInnen unterschiedlicher Institutionen durchgeführt.
Da primär die individuelle Ebene der Konstruktion transnationaler sozialer Felder interessierte, lag im weiteren Untersuchungsverlauf der ausdrückliche Schwerpunkt auf der Wahl qualitativer Forschungsmethoden. Die Durchführung von problemzentrierten Leitfadeninterviews erwies sich dabei als besonders geeignete Strategie. Die transkribierten Interviews wurden einer qualitativen Inhaltsanalyse unterzogen, ausgewertet und individuelle Fallbeispiele durch die Methode der dichten Beschreibung nach Clifford GEERTZ dargestellt. Dabei wurden unterschiedliche Dimensionen transnationaler Handlungsformen im privaten und professionellen Bereich, ihre soziale Einbettung sowie Einflüsse soziopolitischer Rahmenbedingungen offenkundig.
Date: 2009
Abstract: In der Debatte über die vergangenen 20 Jahre, das Ende der DDR und den Neubeginn BRD sucht man fast vergebens einen originären jüdischen Beitrag. Unser kleines, durch die Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung gefördertes und im Wellhöfer-Verlag Mannheim erschienenes Buch fasst nachdenkliche Texte über ein sich selbst organisierendes und verwaltendes jüdisches Vereinsleben zwischen 1989 und 2009 in Ost- und später Gesamtberlin exemplarisch zusammen. 14 JKV-Aktivisten und Sympathisanten erzählen auf 160 Seiten ihre Sicht auf nichtantagonistische Widersprüche, unglaubliche Zufälle und wechselnde Notwendigkeiten. Es geht um Erinnerungen, Einsichten, Erfahrungen aus zwei Jahrzehnten Ehrenamt in Rück- und Vorschau, um Fotos, Dokumente, Auf- und Nachrufe, Chronik und beliebteste Kochrezepte. Lernend von und mit vor allem orthodoxen Rabbinern konnten viele Traditionen des nicht gelebten jüdischen All-, Fest- und Feiertags erfahren werden. Hunderte Referenten aus aller Welt teilten mit uns ihr Wissen. Altgewordene Sozialisten haben nicht nur ihre politische, sondern auch ihre jüdische Identität reflektiert. Die Ereignisse 1989/90 waren ein Auslöser, über NS-Verfolgung und Exil, Ideale, Stalinismus und Irrwege, deutsche und DDR-Geschichte und sich selber nachzudenken. Der JKV wurde zur Heimat für jüdische Antifaschisten und deren Nachfahren, zum Treffpunkt für ehemalige und heutige Emigranten, zur Betstube und zum intellektuellen linken Kulturhaus für alle Welt. Oft mischten wir uns treffsicher in den jüdischen und politischen Dialog ein. Verinnerlichte Solidarität führte am 12. Februar 1990 zur Aufforderung an die Modrow-Regierung, jüdischen Sowjetbürgern die bedingungslose Einwanderung in die DDR zu ermöglichen – das Dokument wird hier erstmals veröffentlicht. Nach den Terroranschlägen vom 9. September 2001 wurden wegen der spürbaren Islamfeindschaft Beziehungen zu Muslimen und deren Vereinen aufgenommen. Der JKV ist ein Gründungsmitglied des Migrationsrats Berlin Brandenburg.
Der Jüdische Kulturverein hat seine selbst gestellte Aufgabe weitgehend erfüllt. Er kann mit diesem Sammelband über seine Geschichte (ISBN 978-3-939540-43-4) abtreten, der Nachwelt stehen wir als Zeitzeugen zur Verfügung. Den „Schmoozeday on Tuesday“ für englischsprachige, nicht nur neue Berliner Jüdinnen und Juden, ist als unsere zeitgemäße Fortsetzung des Vereinslebens bereits etabliert.