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Author(s): Preser, Ruth
Date: 2017
Date: 2020
Abstract: Welche Erfahrungen machen Lehrer*innen mit Antisemitismus und Diskriminierung an Schulen? Welchen Umgang mit antisemitischen Phänomenen praktizieren sie? Welche Praktiken, Präventions- und Interventionsansätze sind bereits etabliert, welche könnten zusätzlich vorgeschlagen, entwickelt und implementiert werden?

Die qualitative Studie „Umgang mit Antisemitismus im Kontext Schule – Berlin“ ist eine Bedarfsanalyse, die vom Kompetenzzentrum für Prävention und Empowerment (ZWST) durchgeführt wird. Hierin wird nach den Sichtweisen, Strategien und Ansätzen von Lehrer*innen, Schulleitungen und Bildungsverwaltung in Bezug auf Antisemitismus und weiteren Diskriminierungsformen an unterschiedlichen Schulen gefragt. Ein wissenschaftlicher Beirat berät die Umsetzung des Forschungsprojekts. Die Umsetzung der Studie findet mit Genehmigung durch die Senatsverwaltung für Bildung, Jugend und Familie statt.

Der Ausgangspunkt praxisorientierter Forschung im Kompetenzzentrum sind langjährige Erfahrungen im Präventions- und Interventionsbereich unterschiedlicher Bildungseinrichtungen. Sowohl die pädagogische Beratung von Schulen als auch die zahlreichen Anfragen seitens betroffener Familien begründen den Bedarf an empirischer Fundierung pädagogischen Handelns im Umgang mit antisemitischer Diskriminierung. Dabei ist es dem Kompetenzzentrum wichtig, mit Lehrer*innen ins Gespräch zu kommen und ihre Anliegen zu erfassen, um gezielt unterstützen zu können.

Auf der methodischen Grundlage der qualitativen Sozialforschung finden vertiefende Einzelinterviews, Gruppendiskussionen sowie fallbezogene Praxisgespräche mit Lehrer*innen, Schulpsycholog*innen und weiteren schulbezogenen Akteur*innen statt.

Dabei werden folgende Forschungsfragen bearbeitet:

Welches Verständnis von Antisemitismus bringen Lehrer*innen in den schulischen Alltag ein?
Welche Umgangsweisen praktizieren Lehrer*innen?
Auf welche Unterstützungssysteme greifen Lehrer*innen dabei zurück?
Welche Ansätze und Methoden können Lehrer*innen darin unterstützen, Antisemitismus und Diskriminierungen vorzubeugen und mit Vorfällen umzugehen?
Welche institutionellen Rahmenbedingungen können hierfür geschaffen werden?
Das Ziel der Studie ist eine Bedarfsanalyse in Bezug auf den Umgang mit Antisemitismus unter Berücksichtigung von Handlungsräumen und Strukturen der Institution Schule. Auf dieser Grundlage werden Empfehlungen für die Prävention und Intervention formuliert. Die Perspektive von Lehrer*innen bietet dabei zentrale Einsichten für die Erstellung einer Gesamtstrategie gegen Antisemitismus auf schulischer, struktureller und bildungspolitischer Ebene.
Author(s): Cronin, Joseph
Date: 2018
Author(s): Alexander, Phil
Date: 2019
Abstract: Silence appears frequently in discourses of the Holocaust – as a metaphorical absence, a warning against forgetting, or simply the only appropriate response. But powerful though these meanings are, they often underplay the ambiguity of silence’s signifying power. This article addresses the liminality of silence through an analysis of its richly textured role in the memorial soundscapes of Berlin. Beyond an aural version of erasure, unspeakability, or the space for reflection upon it, I argue that these silent spaces must always be heard as part of their surrounding urban environment, refracting wider spatial practices and dis/order. When conventions are reversed – when the present is silent – the past can resound in surprising and provocative ways, collapsing spatial and temporal borders and escaping the ritualized boundaries of formal commemoration. This is explored through four different memorial situations: the disturbing resonances within the Holocaust Memorial; the transgressive processes of a collective silent walk; Gleis 17 railway memorial’s opening up of heterotopic ‘gaps’ in time; and sounded/silent history in the work of singer Tania Alon. Each of these examples, in different ways, frames a slippage between urban sound and memorial silence, creating a parallel symbolic space that the past and the present can inhabit simultaneously. In its unpredictable fluidity, silence becomes a mobile and subversive force, producing an imaginative space that is ambiguous, affective and deeply meaningful. A closer attention to these different practices of listening disrupts a top-down, strategic discourse of silence as conventionally emblematic of reflection and distance. The contemporary urban soundscape that slips through the silent cracks problematizes the narrative hegemony of memorial itself.
Date: 2017
Author(s): Alexander, Philip
Date: 2016
Abstract: This research offers an original contribution to the study of contemporary klezmer
music by analysing it in relation to a particular urban environment. With its origins in a
largely destroyed Eastern European Jewish culture, contemporary klezmer is both
historically-grounded and paradoxically rootless, cut loose from geographical
specificity by the internationalism of its recent revival. Seeking to counteract the
music’s modern placeless-ness, this dissertation analyses the musical and spatial means
by which klezmer has been re-rooted in the distinctive material and symbolic conditions
of today’s Berlin. The theoretical framework takes in questions of cultural identity,
music and place, authenticities of tradition and instrumental practice, to show how this
transnational and syncretic music – with few historical ties to Berlin – can be
understood in relation to the city’s particular post-reunification bricolage aesthetic and
subversively creative everyday tactics. Beginning by mapping the criss-crossing
networks of musicians and their multiple artistic perspectives, the dissertation proceeds
through an exploration of the official and unofficial spaces within which these fluid
musical practices operate, leading onto ways that the city of Berlin is made manifest in
the music itself – how the city is interpellated sonically and textually. Processes of
musical transmission and education are analysed through the filters of tradition and
pedagogical ideologies, from which my own instrument, the piano accordion, is used as
a lens through which to uncover the balance between personal expression and
historically-informed performance. The final chapter looks at the relationship between
history, Jewish identity and music in the city. It explores the resonances between the
contested discourse of memorial and present-day cultural and musical production,
discovering how at times sound and music can act as a living sonic embodiment that
speaks against the silence of historical memory
Date: 2008
Author(s): Amit, Hila
Date: 2017
Abstract: Looking at different perspectives and practices regarding Hebrew’s use or place of use, this chapter seeks to find connections between perceptions of diasporic Hebrew as they are envisioned and practiced in contemporary Berlin. What are the various events and activities taking place with regards to Hebrew in contemporary Berlin? How do Hebrew texts written today in Berlin correspond to the work of Scholem, Rosenzweig and others? Who are the people behind these activities and texts, and what is the political significance of their activities?

The article will open with a description of important notions of Zionist ideology. Then, I will describe briefly main aspects relevant to Israeli emigration. I will explain the importance of the city of Berlin to the Hebrew culture starting from the 18th century, as well as a Zionist center in the first half of the 20st century. The last two sections of this article will explore two figures of Israeli emigrants and their activities in contemporary Berlin. I will follow the activist Tal Hever-Chybowski, who claims to have established the first literary journal to be published in Hebrew in Europe since 1944 (entitled: Mikan Va'eilah - “from here and onwards”). Hever- Chybowski describes his motivation in the following words: “The goal of the journal is to become a literary cultural platform for non-hegemonic and non-sovereign Hebrew, a Hebrew that is free from the shackles of nationality and territory.” I say “claim to have established,” because this journal is not yet published, even though Hever-Chybowski describes it as if it is.

I will also follow the work of Mati Shemoeluf, a Hebrew author working in Berlin, who described the wonders of a Hebrew Library in Berlin. Shemoeluf, just like Hever-Chybowski, can be criticized for his embellishments of reality, since the Hebrew library – at least as Shemoeluf describes it - does not really exist. What are their political motivations, and what form of political activity are they practicing, are the questions I address in this chapter.
Author(s): Laguerre, Michel S.
Date: 2008
Abstract: Global Neighborhoods analyzes the organization of everyday life and the social integration of contemporary Jewish neighborhoods in Paris, London, and Berlin. Concentrating on the post-Holocaust era, Michel S. Laguerre explains how each urban diasporic site has followed a different path of development influenced by the local milieu in which it is incorporated. He also considers how technology has enabled extraterritorial relations with Israel and other diasporic enclaves inside and outside the hostland.

Shifting the frame of reference from assimilation theory to globalization theory and the information technology revolution, Laguerre argues that Jewish neighborhoods are not simply transnational social formations, but are fundamentally transglobal entities. Connected to multiple overseas diasporic sites, their interactions reach beyond their homelands, and they develop the logic of their social interactions inside this larger network of relationships. As with all transglobal communities, there is constant movement of people, goods, communications, ideas, images, and capital that sustains and adds vibrancy to everyday life. Since all are connected through the network, Laguerre contends that the variable shape of the local is affected by and affects the global.

Table of Contents

List of Figures, Tables, and Maps
Preface
Acknowledgments
1. Neighborhood Globalization

2. Paris’s Jewish Quarter: Unmade, Remade, and Transformed

3. Berlin’s Jewish Quarter: The Local History of the Global

4. London’s Jewish Neighborhoods: Nodes of Global Networks

5. Residential Districts Versus Business Districts

6. The Jewish Quarter as a Global Chronopolis

7. Paris’s City Hall and the Jewish Quarter

8. Heritage Tourism: The Jewish Quarter as a Theme Park

9. The Jewish Quarter, Other Diasporic Sites, and Israel

10. Information Technology and the Jewish Neighborhood

11. Neighborhoods of Globalization

Conclusion: Global Neighborhoods in the Global Metropolis

Notes
References
Index