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Date: 2020
Abstract: This study, the first to assess mortality among Jews around the world during the COVID-19 crisis, draws on data from a wide variety of sources to understand the extent to which Jews were affected by coronavirus in different parts of the world during the first wave of the pandemic, March to May 2020.

The first section describes the methods of quantification of COVID-19 mortality, and explains why measuring it using the excess mortality method is the most effective way to understand how Jewish communities have been affected. The second section presents data on Jewish mortality during the first wave of the COVID-19 epidemic, drawing particularly on data provided to JPR by Jewish burial societies in communities all over the world. It does so in a comparative perspective, setting the data on Jews alongside the data on non-Jews, to explore both the extent to which Jews have been affected by the COVID-19 epidemic, and how the Jewish experience with COVID-19 compares to the experience of non-Jewish populations.

The immediate impression is that there is not a single ‘Jewish pattern’ that is observable everywhere, and, with respect to the presence of excess mortality, Jewish communities, by and large, followed the populations surrounding them.

The report cautions against speculation about why Jews were disproportionately affected in some places, but rule out two candidate explanations: that Jewish populations with particularly elderly age profiles were hardest hit, or that Jews have been badly affected due to any underlying health issue common among them. They consider the possibility that Jewish lifestyle effects (e.g. above average size families, convening in large groups for Jewish rituals and holidays), may have been an important factor in certain instances, noting that these are unambiguous risk factors in the context of communicable diseases. Whilst they suggest that the spread of the virus among Jews “may have been enhanced by intense social contact,” they argue that without accurate quantification, this explanation for elevated mortality in certain places remains unproven.

The report also includes a strongly worded preface from Hebrew University Professor Sergio DellaPergola, the Chair of the JPR European Jewish Demography Unit, and the world’s leading expert in Jewish demography. In it, he stresses the importance of systematically testing representative samples of the population at the national and local levels, and, in Jewish community contexts, of routinely gathering Jewish population vital statistics. He states: “If there is one lesson for Jewish community research that emerges out of this crisis it is that the routine gathering of vital statistics – the monitoring of deaths, as well as births, marriages, divorces, conversions, immigrants and emigrants – is one of the fundamental responsibilities community bodies must take.”
Date: 2018
Editor(s): Pearce, Andy
Date: 2018
Abstract: Remembering the Holocaust in Educational Settings brings together a group of international experts to investigate the relationship between Holocaust remembrance and different types of educational activity through consideration of how education has become charged with preserving and perpetuating Holocaust memory and an examination of the challenges and opportunities this presents.

The book is divided into two key parts. The first part considers the issues of and approaches to the remembrance of the Holocaust within an educational setting, with essays covering topics such as historical culture, genocide education, familial narratives, the survivor generation, and memory spaces in the United States, United Kingdom, and Germany. In the second part, contributors explore a wide range of case studies within which education and Holocaust remembrance interact, including young people’s understanding of the Holocaust in Germany, Polish identity narratives, Shoah remembrance and education in Israel, the Holocaust and Genocide Centre of Education and Memory in South Africa, and teaching at Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia.

Table of Contents
Series editors’ foreword

Preface

Acknowledgements

Introduction

Education, remembrance, and the Holocaust: towards pedagogic memory-work

Andy Pearce

Part I: Issues, approaches, spaces

1. Lessons at the limits: on learning Holocaust history in historical culture

Klas-Göran Karlsson

2. The anatomy of a relationship: the Holocaust, genocide, and education in Britain

Andy Pearce

3. Väterliteratur: remembering, writing, and reconciling the familial past

Carson Phillips

4. Memories of survivors in Holocaust education

Wolf Kaiser

5. Figures of memory at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Michael Bernard-Donals

6. Imperial War Museums: reflecting and shaping Holocaust memory

Rachel Donnelly

7. Beyond learning facts: teaching commemoration as an educational task in German memorials sites for the victims of National Socialist crimes

Martin Schellenberg

Part II: National perspectives, contexts, and case studies

8. Hitler as a figure of ignorance in young people's incidental accounts of the Holocaust in Germany

Peter Carrier

9. Who was the victim and who was the saviour? The Holocaust in Polish identity narratives

Mikołaj Winiewski, Marta Beneda, Jolanta Ambrosewicz-Jacobs, and Marta Witkowska

10. Conveying the message of Holocaust survivors: Shoah remembrance and education in Israel

Richelle Budd Caplan and Shulamit Imber

11. Holocaust education in the US: a pre-history, 1939–1960

Thomas D. Fallace

12. The Presence of the past: creating a new Holocaust and Genocide Centre of Education and Memory in post-Apartheid South Africa

Tali Nates

13. Educational bridges to the intangible: an Australian perspective to teaching and learning about the Holocaust

Tony Joel, Donna-Lee Frieze, and Mathew Turner

14. Myths, misconceptions, and mis-memory: Holocaust education in England

Stuart Foster