Search results

Your search found 4 items
Sort: Relevance | Topics | Title | Author | Publication Year
Home  / Search Results
Author(s): Kahn-Harris, Keith
Date: 2018
Abstract: The Limmud Impact Study looks at how successful Limmud has been in taking people ‘one step further on their Jewish journeys’, what these journeys consist of and their wider impact on Jewish communities. The study focuses on Limmud volunteers and draws on a survey of ten Limmud volunteer communities in eight countries - UK, USA, South Africa, Bulgaria, Hungary, Germany, Israel and Argentina - together with focus groups conducted with Limmud volunteers from around the world. The findings provide clear evidence that Limmud advances the majority of its volunteers on their Jewish journeys, and for a significant proportion it takes them ‘further’ towards greater interest in and commitment to Jewish life. Limmud’s principle impact on its volunteers lies in making new friends and contacts, encountering different kinds of Jews and enhancing a sense of connection to the Jewish people. For many Limmud volunteers, their experience has increased their Jewish knowledge, their leadership skills and their involvement in the wider Jewish community. Involvement in Limmud therefore enhances both the desire to take further steps on their Jewish journeys, and the tools for doing so. Limmud impacts equally on Jews regardless of denominationand religious practice. The younger the volunteers and the less committed they are when they begin their Limmud journeys, the further Limmud takes them. Those with more senior levels of involvement in Limmud report higher levels of impact on their Jewish journeys than other volunteers, as do those who had received a subsidy or training from Limmud. Limmud volunteers often have difficult experiences and risk burnout and exhaustion. While volunteers generally view the gains as worth the cost, Limmud needs to pay attention to this issue and provide further support.
Date: 2003
Abstract: This volume analyzes and compares how Jews conceive of their Jewishness. Identity as a Jew is in most places a matter of choice, making for a wide variety of self-understandings and definitions. Even where tradition is attractive to many Jews, they increasingly sense that it is they who choose the tradition or whatever aspects of the tradition they choose to celebrate; the tradition is not imperative and cannot impose attitudes and forms of behavior. Contents:  1 Social Identity in British and South African Jewry
Jacqueline Goldberg
2 Religious Identity in the Social and Political Arena: An Examination of the
Attitudes of Orthodox and Progressive Jews in the UK
Barry Kosmin
3 Changing Patterns of Jewish Identity among British Jews
Stephen Miller
4 A Typological Approach to French Jewry
Regine Azria
5 "Jewishness" in Postmodernity: The Case of Sweden
Lars Dencik
6 Becoming Jewish in Russia and Ukraine
Zvi Gitelman
7 The Jewish Press and Jewish Identity: Leningrad/St. Petersburg, 1989-1992
John D. Klier
8 Patterns of Jewish Identity in the Jewish Community of Moldova: The Behavioral Dimension
Malka Korazim and Esther Katz
9 Jewish Identity and the Orthodox Church in Late Soviet Russia
Judith Deutsch Kornblatt
10 Looking Out for One's Own Identity: Central Asian Jews in the Wake of
Communism
Alanna E. Cooper
11 Jewish Groups and Identity Strategies in Post-Communist Hungary
Andrs̀ Kovc ̀s
12 Particularizing the Universal: New Polish Jewish Identities and a New Framework
of Analysis
Marius Gudonis
13 Polish Jewish Institutions in Transition: Personalities Over Process
Claire A. Rosenson
14 Jewish Identity in the United States and Israel
Charles S. Liebman
15 Notes Towards the Definition of Jewish Culture in the New Europe
Jonathan Webber
16 Conclusion: Jewish Identity in Transition: Transformation or Attenuation?