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Author(s): Younes, Anne-Esther
Date: 2020
Abstract: This paper examines the discourse around anti-Semitism in Germany since 2000. The discourse makes use of the figure of the Jew for national security purposes (i.e. via the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the trope of the “dangerous Muslim”) and the politics of national identity. The article introduces the concept of the “War on Anti-Semitism”, an assemblage of policies about national belonging and security that are propelled primarily by white racial anxieties. While the War on Terror is fought against the Muslim Other, or the War on Drugs is fought against predominantly Latinx and Black communities, the War on Anti-Semitism is ostensibly fought on behalf of the racialized Jewish Other. The War on Anti-Semitism serves as a pretext justifying Germany's internal and external security measures by providing a logic for the management of non-white migration in an ethnically diverse yet white supremacist Europe.

In 2000, a new citizenship law fundamentally changed the architecture of belonging and im/migration by replacing the old Wilhelminian jus sanguinis (principle of blood) with a jus soli (principle of residency). In the wake of these changes and the resulting racial anxiety about Germanness, state sponsored civil-society educational programs to fight anti-Semitism emerged, targeting predominantly Muslim non-/citizens. These education programs were developed alongside international debates around the War on Terror and what came to be called “Israel-oriented anti-Semitism” in Germany (more commonly known as “Muslim anti-Semitism”).

Triangulated through the enduring legacy of colonial racialization, the Jew and the Muslim are con/figured as enemies in socio-political German discourses. This analysis of the War on Anti-Semitism has serious implications for our understanding of “New Europe”. By focusing on the figure of the Jew and the Muslim, the implications of this work transcend national borders and stress the important connection between fantasy, power, and racialization in Germany and beyond.
Author(s): Dart, Jon
Date: 2021
Abstract: In June 2020, Black Lives Matter UK (BLM-UK) posted a series of tweets in which they endorsed the pro-Palestinian Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement. Calling for ‘targeted sanctions in line with international law against Israel’s colonial, apartheid regime,’ one tweet claimed that ‘mainstream British politics is gagged of the right to critique Zionism’. The tweets were seen by some to be antisemitic and resulted in the English Premier League, the BBC and Sky Sports, which had hitherto been supportive of the Black Lives Matter protests, distance themselves from the Black Lives Matter movement. One month later, during the BLM protests in the USA, Black NFL player DeSean Jackson posted material to his Instagram story that was also viewed as antisemitic. This article unpacks, via these two sports-based incidents, the relationship between anti-racism, antisemitism, and anti-Zionism. I discuss how these tensions are not new, but a clear echo of the tensions that existed in the 1960s and 1970s during the height of the Civil Rights Movement; these tensions continue because the foundational issues remain unchanged. These two incidents raise important questions about how sports organisations operate in a world where sport is seen as ‘apolitical’ and strive for ‘neutrality’ but fail to recognise sport is political and that a position of neutrality cannot be successfully achieved. The article assesses the challenges that arise when sports organisations, and their athletes, choose to engage in a certain kind of sport politics.
Author(s): Bush, Stephen
Date: 2021
Abstract: The brutal, racist murder of George Floyd on 25 May 2020 sparked a reckoning about the treatment of Black people all over the world, and the undeniable reality of systemic racism and discrimination in societies on both sides of the Atlantic. We vociferously expressed our concerns about this at the time. However, we realised that we needed to go further. No community is immune from the scourge of prejudice and ours is no exception. As society as a whole sought to examine racial diversity, the Board of Deputies became aware of moving and concerning testimonies of Black members of our own community about their experiences.

As such, we launched this Commission to learn more about the experiences of Black Jews, Jews of Colour and Sephardi, Mizrahi and Yemenite Jews, to examine the issues and make recommendations for how our community can do better. We were delighted that the eminent journalist of Black and Jewish heritage, Stephen Bush, agreed to Chair the Commission.

The report’s release in the week that George Floyd’s murderer has been found guilty, and on this year’s Stephen Lawrence Day, feels particularly poignant, especially given the Commission’s many references to the Macpherson report into the murder of Stephen Lawrence.

Our Commission has considered 17 different areas of communal life, and the ground-breaking report makes 119 recommendations, with profound implications for British Jewry. Among them are the following:



Representative bodies and organisations involved in rabbinic training should encourage members of under-represented ethnic groups to put themselves forward for communal roles
Jewish schools should ensure that their secular curriculum engages with Black history, enslavement and the legacy of colonialism, and review their curriculum through a process led by students, particularly those who define as Black or of Colour
Jewish studies departments should ensure that their teaching celebrates and engages with the racial and cultural diversity of the Jewish community worldwide, including Mizrahi, Sephardi and Yemenite tradition
Communal institutions, particularly synagogues and schools, should commemorate key dates for diverse parts of the community, like the Ethiopian Jewish festival of Sigd and the official Day to Mark the Departure and Expulsion of Jews from the Arab Countries and Iran (30th November)
Schools and youth movements should improve training for teachers and youth leaders on tackling racist incidents
Communal bodies and Jewish schools should establish regular listening exercises that seek the concerns of their members or students
Communal bodies should ensure that complaints processes are accessible, transparent, fair and robust, with all complaints related to racism handled according to the Macpherson principle, and specific new processes for handling complaints about security
Communal venues should ensure that their security guards or volunteers desist from racial profiling
Communal venues should institute bag searches for all visitors, including regular attendees, so as not to stigmatise people who look different, without compromising on security
A code of conduct should be developed for discourse on social media, making clear that attempts to delegitimise converts, calling people names such as ‘Kapo’, or using Yiddish terms such as ‘Shvartzer’ in a racist way, are completely unacceptable
Batei Din should improve processes for conversion, including stricter vetting of teachers and host families, and a clearer process for complaints
Date: 2003
Author(s): Davidović, Maja
Date: 2017
Author(s): Kalmar, Ivan
Date: 2020
Date: 2010
Abstract: The question as posed is a challenge, not only to those who assigned it as a theme to be explored, and not only to those who expect to answer it, but also to all of Europe in which anti-Semitism persistently continues to show its face half a century after the closing of the Death Camps. Five decades separate us from the last days of the Gas Chambers and of the Crematoria, and still the embers of hatred for Jews, for "The Despised Other", smoulder beneath the surface of post-World War II Europe, erupting spasmodically from Madrid to Moscow. The question as phrased is a direct challenge to all of European heritage precisely because it contains its own answer, an answer no one desires to express or hear, for it embodies a confession of a fundamental flaw in the fraying tapestry that is Europe today after Bosnia. To give voice to the answer, however circuitously, would be to confront head on the centrifugal danger that, if not neutralised, could unravel the process of European unification and integration. The question as put is a classic example of a rhetorical query of a combined question and answer: thus "Why is it so?" implies, at the same time, "Hatred for Jews did not die in Auschwitz; it was not even mortally wounded". The only question remaining is: "How forthright will the attempt to examine the answer be?" Not how accurate, but how honest? Unavoidably it will be accusatory and, quite possibly, offensive. As one performs cultural vivisection of that which was, still is, and, most probably, will continue to be an attribute of a Europe chronically infected by the virus of continuing anti-Semitism, there has to be, of necessity, a shocked response. Hence the underlying tension of the topic for which the messenger is all too often blamed.
Date: 2000
Author(s): Hochberg, Gil Z.
Date: 2016
Date: 2018
Abstract: Реализация этого проекта предполагала включение 25 вопросов в ежемесячный опрос по общенациональной выборке. Опрос был проведен 23–30 августа 2018 года по репрезентативной
всероссийской выборке городского и сельского населения объемом 1600 человек в возрасте от
18 лет и старше в 136 населенных пунктах, 52 субъектах РФ. Исследование проводилось на дому
у респондента методом личного интервью. Распределение ответов (если не указано иное) приводится в процентах от общего числа опрошенных. Полученные данные дополнены результатами и
выводами из аналогичных исследований Левада-центра, проводимых с 1990 года, прежде всего –
материалами июльского опроса 2018 года.
В настоящем Отчете акцент сделан на анализ ксенофобских установок и их изменений в России;
меньшее внимание уделено потенциалу и угрозе, вызванных антисемитизмом, поскольку сравнительно недавно (в 2016 г.) Левада-центром были проведено большое исследование населения
России по этой проблеме, а в 2018 году отдельно - опрос евреев России по этой же теме (количественный опрос и серия фокус групп)1
, посвященных среди прочего динамике ксенофобских
и антисемитских настроений в обществе и форм их выражения, а также оценкам потенциальных
угроз российскими евреями
Date: 2018
Author(s): Hoření, Karina
Date: 2018
Abstract: Stereotypy o Romech a Židech v české společnosti. Jaké jsou a jak s nimi pracovat?

Jak funguje vzdělávání proti předsudkům v českých školách a jaké jsou příklady dobré praxe?

Tým ze Sociologického ústavu Akademie věd na datech z posledních let ukázal, jak jsou v české společnosti rozšířené stereotypy o Romech a Židech. Jedním ze zjištění je, že menší předsudky vůči Romům mají lidé, kteří se s nějakými Romy osobně znají.

Škola je jedním z nejdůležitějších míst, kde je možné pozitivně ovlivnit postoje mladých lidí. Tým Ústavu pro studium totalitních režimů se proto ptal učitelů a lektorů, jaké jsou jejich zkušenosti se vzděláváním k toleranci. Nabízíme doporučení, jak pomoci školám efektivně oslabovat předsudky.

Zjistili jsme, že předpokladem úspěchu je spolupráce celé školy. Další úspěšnou strategií je podpora setkávání žáků z různých sociálních skupin. Je rovněž třeba podporovat vzdělávání učitelů tak, aby dokázali ve třídě zvládat debatu o kontroverzních tématech.

Výsledky výzkumu jsme shrnuli do závěrečné zprávy, v níž najdete:

Kvalitativní i kvantitativní shrnutí současné praxe vzdělávání pro toleranci, realizovaných programů a jejich podpory.
Naše doporučení pro donory, jak efektivněji nastavit projektovou podporu, a pro školy a pedagogy, jak s předsudky ve škole lépe pracovat.
Rozsáhlou studii o postojích české společnosti vůči Romům a Židům.

Abstract: #AtmintisAtsakomybeAteitis
Atmintis. Atsakomybė. Ateitis. Tai yra nuoseklūs laiptai, vedantys link realių teigiamų pokyčių
visuomenėje. Demokratijos ir tolerancijos ateitis priklauso nuo atminties ir prisiimtos atsakomybės,
leidžiančių žengti toliau. Žingsnis į ateitį – apžvelgus, įvertinus ir pasirėmus geriausių iniciatyvų prieš
diskriminaciją patirtimi – toks yra šio projekto tikslas.
Nuosekliai dirbant žmogaus teisių užtikrinimo ir tolerancijos sklaidos bei švietimo srityje Lietuvos žydų
Lietuvos žydų (litvakų) bendruomenė subūrė ekspertų grupę iš Lietuvos žmogaus teisių ekspertų,
bendruomenių aktyvistų, akademinės visuomenės atstovų ir užsienio ekspertų. Ši grupė ėmėsi ambicingos
užduoties - kurti veiksmingas ir kokybiškas rekomendacijas dėl veiksmų, kovojant su antisemitizmu ir
romafobija Lietuvoje.
Inicijavusi tyrimus ir remdamasi jų rezultatais, pasitelkusi mokslinius darbus bei geruosius pavyzdžius,
analizuoti projektai ir socialines iniciatyvos, prisidėjusios prie ksenofobijos apraiškų mažinimo Lietuvos
visuomenėje. Grupė ekspertų ruošė rekomendacijas ir išvadas, apie veiksmus, kurie geriausiai pasiekia
tikslines grupes ir turi esminį poveikį, skleidžiant toleranciją, keičiant visuomenės požiūrį į žydų bei romų
tautines bendruomenes, bei integruojant pažeidžiamiausias grupes į visuomenę.
Naujosios rekomendacijos teikiamos EVZ fondui ir viešinamos Europos sąjungos lygmeniu.
Šių rekomendacijų pagrindu EVZ fondas formuos tolimesnių programų gaires, kovojant su antisemitizmo,
romafobijos ir ksenofobijos apraiškomis Europos šalyse. Jomis vadovaujantis, bus siekiama efektyviai
šalinti Lietuvos visuomenėje netoleranciją skatinančius stereotipus, mažinti atskirtį tarp etninių sluoksnių,
užkirsti kelią įvairioms neapykantos „kitokiems“ apraiškoms.
Projektą lydėjo informacinė kampanija #AtmintisAtsakomybeAteitis socialiniuose tinkluose, ruošti
straipsniai Lietuvos žiniasklaidoje, įvairūs renginiai, orientuoti į visuomenės švietimą apie tragišką žydų ir
romų patirtį Holokausto metu ir sklaidantys ksenofobinius mitus.
Sukurtos rekomendacijos pristatytos baigiamojoje tarptautinėje konferencijoje, skirtoje paminėti
tarptautinę dieną prieš fašizmą ir antisemitizmą. Konferencija bei kiti renginiai padėjo plėtoti efektyvų valdžios institucijų ir nevyriausybinio sektoriaus dialogą, pasidalinti patirtimi ir rekomendacijomis, siekiant
užtikrinti tautinių bendruomenių teisių ir laisvių įtvirtinimą bei įgyvendinimą, demokratinių procesų ir
pilietinės visuomenės Lietuvoje stiprinimą ir tolerancijos sklaidą.
Lietuvos žydų (litvakų) bendruomenė projektą vykdė kartu su partneriais:
Romų visuomenės centras
Lietuvos žmogaus teisių centras
Moterų informacijos centras
Projektą „Rekomendacijų dėl veiksmų kovojant su antisemitizmu ir romafobija Lietuvoje, paruošimas ir
viešinimas“ rėmė:
EVZ fondas (Vokietija). („Erinnerung, Verantwortung, Zukunft“ vok. – tai „Atmintis, Atsakomybė,
Ateitis“ liet). Fondas remia sistemingus ir ilgalaikius tyrimus, analizuojančius romų ir žydų diskriminavimą
bei marginalizaciją Europoje.
Date: 2014
Date: 2015
Date: 2017
Abstract: La Fondazione Centro di Documentazione Ebraica Contemporanea e Ipsos hanno realizzato un’indagine volta ad indagare quali siano oggi le opinioni ed i sentimenti degli Italiani nei confronti degli ebrei: apertura/chiusura, possibili stereotipi diffusi, fino ad arrivare al misurare la presenza o meno di un vero e proprio antisemitismo.

L’indagine si inserisce all’interno di un quadro conoscitivo da parte dell’Osservatorio antisemitismo del CDEC già molto articolato, approfondito e ricco di indagini passate sia di natura qualitativa che quantitativa, sebbene – soprattutto quelle quantitative – siano un po’ datate nel tempo.

L’obiettivo di CDEC è stato dunque quello di disporre di un’indagine di scenario aggiornata, caratterizzata da una solida metodologia di rilevazione e che possa diventare un punto di partenza anche per monitoraggi periodici che vadano a costruire una sorta di «barometro dell’intolleranza».

Affrontare un tema come quello delle opinioni nei confronti di gruppi etnici o religiosi specifici, espone ai rischi della cosiddetta desiderabilità sociale, cioè al fatto che gli intervistati più difficilmente esprimono direttamente posizioni critiche o negative su temi come questo. In sostanza, sapendo che le proprie opinioni possono essere oggetto di riprovazione sociale, si tende a non esprimerle se non addirittura a mascherarle.

E’ apparso opportuno quindi far precedere il set di domande dedicate al tema specifico, da alcune domande utili a classificare gli intervistati in termini di apertura più generale nei confronti del mondo e verso «l’altro» e il «diverso», già sperimentate e validate da Ipsos in altre indagini su temi analoghi con un approfondimento sul tema dell’immigrazione: al netto dei rischi terroristici, respingimento o accoglienza? Gli immigrati sono un problema per il nostro stile di vita?
Author(s): Arkin, Kimberly A.
Date: 2014
Abstract: During the course of her fieldwork in Paris, anthropologist Kimberly Arkin heard what she thought was a surprising admission. A French-born, North African Jewish (Sephardi) teenage girl laughingly told Arkin she was a racist. When asked what she meant by that, the girl responded, "It means I hate Arabs."

This girl was not unique. She and other Sephardi youth in Paris insisted, again and again, that they were not French, though born in France, and that they could not imagine their Jewish future in France. Fueled by her candid and compelling informants, Arkin's analysis delves into the connections and disjunctures between Jews and Muslims, religion and secular Republicanism, race and national community, and identity and culture in post-colonial France. Rhinestones argues that Sephardi youth, as both "Arabs" and "Jews," fall between categories of class, religion, and culture. Many reacted to this liminality by going beyond religion and culture to categorize their Jewishness as race, distinguishing Sephardi Jews from "Arab" Muslims, regardless of similarities they shared, while linking them to "European" Jews (Ashkenazim), regardless of their differences. But while racializing Jewishness might have made Sephardi Frenchness possible, it produced the opposite result: it re-grounded national community in religion-as-race, thereby making pluri-religious community appear threatening. Rhinestones thus sheds light on the production of race, alienation, and intolerance within marginalized French and European populations.
Author(s): Goluboff, Sascha L.
Date: 2002
Abstract: The prevalence of anti-Semitism in Russia is well known, but the issue of race within the Jewish community has rarely been discussed explicitly. Combining ethnography with archival research, Jewish Russians: Upheavals in a Moscow Synagogue documents the changing face of the historically dominant Russian Jewish community in the mid-1990s. Sascha Goluboff focuses on a Moscow synagogue, now comprising individuals from radically different cultures and backgrounds, as a nexus from which to explore issues of identity creation and negotiation. Following the rapid rise of this transnational congregation—headed by a Western rabbi and consisting of Jews from Georgia and the mountains of Azerbaijan and Dagestan, along with Bukharan Jews from Central Asia—she evaluates the process that created this diverse gathering and offers an intimate sense of individual interactions in the context of the synagogue's congregation.

Challenging earlier research claims that Russian and Jewish identities are mutually exclusive, Goluboff illustrates how post-Soviet Jews use Russian and Jewish ethnic labels and racial categories to describe themselves. Jews at the synagogue were constantly engaged in often contradictory but always culturally meaningful processes of identity formation. Ambivalent about emerging class distinctions, Georgian, Russian, Mountain, and Bukharan Jews evaluated one another based on each group's supposed success or failure in the new market economy. Goluboff argues that post-Soviet Jewry is based on perceived racial, class, and ethnic differences as they emerge within discourses of belonging to the Jewish people and the new Russian nation.