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Date: 2020
Abstract: This report, which focuses on the past two academic years, uncovers a much higher number of antisemitic incidents
on UK campuses than had previously been reported. It shows that in some instances, university staff, academics
and student societies were themselves responsible for antisemitism on campus, and that university complaints processes are sometimes inadequate. In one case reported to CST, a Jewish student at the University of Warwick was even subjected to disciplinary investigation after he complained that a member of academic staff had made an antisemitic comment in a lecture. This was later dropped with no action taken against the student.

CST recorded a total of 58 university incidents in the 2018/2019 academic year and 65 university incidents in the
2019/2020 academic year, making a total of 123 antisemitic incidents during the two years covered by this report. The total for 2019/2020 is the highest total CST has ever recorded in a single academic year, despite the year being cut short as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Previously, CST had recorded university incidents by calendar
year, and logged 25 such incidents in 2018; 22 in 2017; and 41 in 2016. The significant increase in university incident totals since 2018 reflects a sustained drive by CST’s campus team to encourage students to report antisemitic incidents. This increase in the number of university incidents therefore needs to be seen within the context of increased awareness among university students of the need and importance of reporting incidents to CST, as well as the rising levels of antisemitism in the UK more widely. It is likely that more incidents
remain unreported.
Author(s): Bernstein, Julia
Date: 2018
Abstract: „Antisemitismus ist an deutschen Schulen Normalität.“ Zu diesem Ergebnis kommt die im Dezember 2018 veröffentlichte Studie „‚Mach mal keine Judenaktion!‘ Herausforderungen und Lösungsansätze in der professionellen Bildungs- und Sozialarbeit gegen Antisemitismus“ von Prof. Dr. Julia Bernstein unter Mitarbeit von Florian Diddens, Ricarda Theiss und Nathalie Friedlender.

Für die Studie wurden 227 Interviews an 171 Schulen mit jüdischen Schülerinnen und Schülern, deren Eltern, mit jüdischen und nichtjüdischen Lehrkräften sowie mit Fachleuten aus der Sozialarbeit und aus Bildungsorganisationen durchgeführt. Die Befunde von Prof. Dr. Bernstein zeigen, dass antisemitische Äußerungen und Handlungen an Schulen normal sind und häufig nicht erkannt werden. Jüdische Kinder und Jugendliche erleben subtile Anmerkungen, diffuse Ablehnung, offenen Hass und Gewalt. Die offene Selbstpräsentation als Jüdin_Jude in der Schule wird aufgrund der Gefahr von antisemitischen Angriffen weitgehend vermieden. Die Perspektive der jüdischen Lehrer_innen zeigt, dass sie als offen auftretende religiöse Jüdinnen_Juden sowohl von der Schulleitung und im Kollegium als auch von Schüler_innen Benachteiligungen, teils sogar Anfeindungen erfahren.
Es ist die erste empirische Studie zu Antisemitismus im schulischen Bereich, die die Perspektiven von Jüdinnen und Juden in den Vordergrund stellt. Die Studie schlüsselt die Erlebnisberichte aus drei Perspektiven auf: die der jüdischen Schüler/-innen, die der nicht-jüdischen Lehrkräfte und die der jüdischen Lehrkräfte.
Date: 2015
Abstract: Three previous research projects undertaken by the Research and Evaluation Department of UJIA between 2012 and 2014 have been re-analysed to extract anything relevant to identify the Jewish journey taken by key individuals within the Jewish community.

Gap year research data indicates that almost 40% of respondents who have been on a Gap year or Yeshiva/Seminary in Israel identify themselves as Modern Orthodox and almost 60% had also attended a Jewish school.

49% respondents stated they chose their Gap year organisation because they had previously been on Israel Tour with them and 65% regularly participated in their activities.

From those Gap year graduates amongst the Youth Commission respondents, more than 65% said they were currently involved with a Youth organisation. This is reinforced by nearly 60% of respondents to the Israel Experience survey who had also been on a Gap year stating they had attended a JSoc and a similar percentage were still part of their youth movement. 30% stated they had been fundraising for Israel or had donated to UJIA.

Most of the Gap year respondents felt that going on their Gap year had a positive influence on the likelihood to engage with the Jewish community in the future.

The respondents to the Israel Experience Survey (2012) who had also been on a Gap year, mostly thought their Gap year had been extremely important in shaping their Jewish life, even more so than their family or youth movement.

The Gap year research suggested that almost 70% of respondents, who had previously been on a Gap year, felt that the whole experience had positively affected their likelihood to make Aliyah.

16 individual stories from these previous research studies have been used to highlight some of the Jewish journeys completed by some of our leaders since their time on Gap year.
Author(s): Graham, David
Date: 2014
Abstract: During the 1990s, Jewish communal leaders in Britain reached a consensus that Jewish education, in the broadest sense, was the principal means of strengthening Jewish identity and securing Jewish continuity. This belief motivated considerable investment in communal intervention programs such as Jewish schools, Israel experience trips, and youth movements. Twenty years on, it is pertinent to ask whether, and to what extent, this intervention has worked. The Institute for Jewish Policy Research’s (JPR) 2011 National Jewish Student Survey contains data on over 900 Jewish students in Britain and presents an opportunity to empirically assess the impact such intervention programs may have had on respondents’ Jewish identity by comparing those who have experienced them with those who have not. Regression analysis is used to test the theory based on a set of six dimensions of Jewish identity generated using principal component analysis. The results show that after controlling for the substantial effects of Jewish upbringing, intervention has collectively had a positive impact on all aspects of Jewish identity examined. The effects are greatest on behavioral and mental aspects of socio-religious identity; they are far weaker at strengthening student community engagement, ethnocentricity, and Jewish values. Further, the most important intervention programs were found to be yeshiva and a gap year in Israel. Both youth movement involvement and Jewish schooling had positive but rather limited effects on Jewish identity, and short-stay Israel tours had no positive measurable effects at all.