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Date: 2021
Abstract: This article presents research notes on an oral history project on the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on Jews over the age of 65 years. During the first stage of the project, we conducted nearly 80 interviews in eight cities worldwide: Amsterdam, Berlin, London, Milan, New York, Paris, Rio de Janeiro, and St. Petersburg, and in Israel. The interviews were conducted in the spring of 2020 and reflect the atmosphere and perception of interviewees at the end of the first lockdown.

Based on an analysis of the interviews, the findings are divided into three spheres: (1) the personal experience during the pandemic, including personal difficulties and the impact of the lockdown on family and social contacts; (2) Jewish communal life, manifested in changed functions and emergence of new needs, as well as religious rituals during the pandemic; and (3) perceived relations between the Jewish community and wider society, including relations with state authorities and civil society, attitudes of and towards official media, and the possible impact of COVID-19 on antisemitism. Together, these spheres shed light on how elderly Jews experience their current situation under COVID-19—as individuals and as part of a community.

COVID-19 taught interviewees to reappraise what was important to them. They felt their family relations became stronger under the pandemic, and that their Jewish community was more meaningful than they had thought. They understood that online communication will continue to be present in all three spheres, but concluded that human contact cannot be substituted by technical devices.
Date: 2019
Abstract: This study investigates the ethnic identity of the 1.5 and second-generation of Russian-speaking Jewish immigrants to Germany and the U.S. in the most recent wave of immigration. Between 1989 and the mid-2000s, approximately 320,000 Russian-speaking Jewish immigrants departed the (former) Soviet Union for the U.S. and an additional 220,000 moved to Germany. The 1.5 and second-generations have successfully integrated into mainstream institutions, like schools and the workforce, but not the co-ethnic Jewish community in each country. Moreover, Russian-speaking Jewish immigrants are subject to a number of critiques, most prominently, of having a ‘thin culture’ that relies on abstract forms of ethnic expression and lacks in frequent and concrete forms of identification (Gitelman 1998).

The study asks several questions: how the 1.5 and second-generation see themselves as a distinctive social group? Where do they locate social boundaries between themselves and others? How do they maintain them? Close family ties lie at the center of the group’s ethnic identity. Russian-speaking cultures offer an alternative, and in the mind of the 1.5 and second-generation, superior approach to relating to family and friends, where, for example, being an unmarried adult does not contradict living at home or where youths and adults can socialize in the same setting. Their understandings and practices of family often run counter to the expectations of the mainstream in both Germany and the U.S. of what it means to be an independent adult. The organization and expectation of social relations among these immigrants reflect not only their different national origins, but their constitution as a distinctive moral community. Different foods and language use support these immigrants’ sense of group distinctiveness and reinforce the centrality of family as a shared ethnic practice.

Immigration has endowed family practices with the capacity to impart a sense of distinctiveness to the 1.5 and second-generation by changing the context in which close family ties are practiced. Transported across national borders these practices now contrast with prevailing understandings of family and serve as a cultural resource. Moreover, Russian-speaking Jewish immigrants have benefited, both culturally and economically, from state policies that granted them refugee status and enabled them to cross national borders as families and avoid years of separation other immigrants often must endure. The distinctiveness of Russian-speaking Jewish immigrants’ family practices is relative to those of the receiving country’s mainstream, but not those of other immigrant groups. As a result, a sense of group difference and belonging anchored in these practices may be challenging to impart to the third generation, who are removed from the immigration experience. Nevertheless, the 1.5 and second-generation experience their family relationships, obligations and expectations as anything but ‘thin’. They inform consequential decisions, are encountered regularly, and offer meaning to their lives as individuals, children and members of an immigrant and ethnic group.

This study draws on in-depth interviews in New York City and multiple locations in Germany with 93 Russian-speaking Jewish immigrants who arrived at the age of 13 or younger or were born in the U.S. or Germany. Despite the different history and structure of Jewish communities in the U.S. and Germany, 1.5 and second-generation Russian-speaking Jewish immigrants’ experience in each country have much in common with one another, a finding that emerged as a result of the study’s comparative design.
Date: 2020
Abstract: Статья посвящена проблеме межэтнических брачных союзов, в основу исследования легли экспедиционные материалы, собранные в Приднестровье в 2017-2019 гг. В еврейской среде в советский период традиция смешанных браков получает широкое распространение, такие союзы приводят к трансформации классического определения еврейства, что в свою очередь оказывает влияние на представления партнеров о собственной идентичности. Авторами было собрано и проанализировано 29 интервью с информантами (евреями и неевреями), состоявшими в смешанных браках, и их детьми; были выделены три основных зоны напряжения в межэтнических семьях (восприятие данного союза окружающими, имянаречение ребенка и похороны) и три стратегии преодоления напряжения: выбор нейтральной и светской традиции; компромисс (сочетание двух традиций) и интеграция одного из партнеров в культуру другого. В качестве зоны кросс-культурного взаимодействия информанты выделяли праздники; связанные с ними традиции, как правило, были смешанными (например, Песах и Пасха). Авторы приходят к выводу, что описываемый синтез культур приводит к дрейфу идентичности информантов и трансформации представлений о «настоящем еврее», согласно которым знания о традиции или практические навыки становятся важнее принципов галахи.
Editor(s): Leiße, Olaf
Date: 2019
Author(s): Bronec, Jakub
Date: 2019
Date: 2020
Date: 2020
Author(s): Rowland, Gemma
Date: 2016
Abstract: Previous research suggests that children of minority groups may be underserved by
mainstream services (Elster, Jarosik, VanGeest & Fleming, 2003). There has been
an identified need for research that focuses on barriers to accessing services faced
by minority groups, such as the Orthodox Jewish community (Dogra, Singh,
Svirdzenka & Vostansis, 2012). Given that parents are often the gate-keepers to
care (Stiffman, Pescosolido & Cabassa, 2004), understanding their help-seeking
behaviour is crucial to ensure that Orthodox children and families are given the same
opportunities to access services as their majority group peers. To date there is
extremely limited research on the help-seeking behaviours of Orthodox Jewish
parents. The current study sought to consider the experiences of Orthodox Jewish
parents who have accessed Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS)
in order to seek help for their families.

Semi-structured interviews were completed with nine Orthodox Jewish parents with
regards to their experiences of accessing tier 2 CAMHS for their child. A thematic
analysis was conducted. Four themes were found: ‘The Orthodox community as
unique’, ‘Pathways to help’, ‘Attitudes towards mental health’ and ‘The parental
journey’.

Participants described a number of significant cultural barriers to seeking help.
Stigma was identified as occurring in relation to mental health and also in relation to
the process of help-seeking, as suggested by previous research within adult
Orthodox populations (Feinberg & Feinberg, 1985). These stigmas relate to
concerns regarding labelling and future matchmaking for the child and their siblings.
Parents experience emotional and practical strains in parenting a child with mental
health difficulties and in accessing psychological support for their children. The
implications for service level change and clinical practice are considered.
Author(s): Nizard, Sophie
Date: 2012
Abstract: À partir des processus d’adoption par des parents juifs, Sophie Nizard révèle comment se disent l’histoire, la mémoire, la transmission, le rapport entre l’identité religieuse et familiale d’une part et le biologique ou l’hérédité d’autre part.
L’adoption est au croisement des problématiques de la transmission familiale, de la mémoire, et de la religion. Que devient dans ce contexte la transmission matrilinéaire de la judéité ? Par quelles voies les parents adoptants introduisent des enfants non biologiques dans les canaux de la filiation et de la transmission mémorielle ou religieuse du judaïsme ? À partir de cas d’adoption dans des familles juives pratiquantes et non pratiquantes, en France et en Israël, l’auteur met en évidence les enjeux et les complexités autour de ce qu’est être ou devenir juif aujourd’hui, , rend compte du parcours de l’adoption et des questions qu’elle soulève aux divers acteurs : institutions religieuses, organismes d’adoption, travailleurs sociaux, enfants adoptés et parents adoptifs. Elle livre une analyse fine et sensible de la parenté en monde juif, décrit les différences des contextes juridique et légal des deux pays. Cette comparaison permet de comprendre comment dans deux contextes extrêmement différents du point de vue des rapports entre le politique et le religieux, travaille la définition de l’appartenance : qu’est-ce qu’être français, qu’est-ce qu’être israélien, qu’est-ce qu’être juif dans les deux configurations ?

SOMMAIRE
Introduction : Entre parenté et judaïsme - L’adoption un objet partagé
Chapitre I. Filiation dans les textes et positions halakhiques contemporaines
L’impératif de la procréation et les récits de filiation dans les textes de la tradition juive, dans les mythes et les contes populaires
Faire famille : transmission, continuité et ruptures
Chapitre II. L’enquête : Entre la France et Israël
L’adoption, un éléphant dans le salon ?
Les terrains de la recherche
Les acteurs et les procédures de l’adoption en France et à l’international
L’adoption en Israël – Les enjeux politico-religieux
La situation israélienne
Chapitre III. Les étapes d’un « parcours du combattant »
Du désir de procréation à la décision d’adopter
Obtenir l’agrément
Adopter en France : ethnicité, reconnaissance et « look différentiel »
L’adoption internationale
Chapitre IV – La rencontre
L’accélération du temps – l’accélération du récit
L’enfant imaginé, l’enfant photographié, l’enfant rencontré, l’enfant adopté
L’origine de l’enfant, ce que l’on sait de lui, ce que l’on ne veut pas savoir, ce que l’on raconte
La rencontre : un destin ?
Le temps du retour
Devenir parents
Chapitre V. Nommer, inscrire, convertir
Nommer c’est inscrire
La judéité des enfants adoptés : une identité de fait
Convertir
Chapitre VI - Entre hérédité et identification – Le récit des « origines »
Des représentations paradoxales de la filiation : liens du sang / liens du cœur
Le poids de l’hérédité
L’arbre généalogique : une mise en image de la famille dans le temps
La construction des identités individuelles et familiales
Trois récits singuliers : la parole des adoptés et la recherche des origines
Camille : une mère qui se met à la place de ses mères
Sabrina : un entre-deux identitaire
Anna : la construction d’une nouvelle identité familiale
Une mise en perspective
Conclusion – Transmettre
Bibliographie
Translated Title: Jewish family life in Norway
Author(s): Høeg, Ida Marie
Date: 2003
Author(s): Bodemann, Y. Michal
Date: 2004
Abstract: mmediately after the Holocaust, it seemed inconceivable that a Jewish community would rebuild in Germany. What was once unimaginable has now come to pass: Germany is home to one of Europe’s most vibrant Jewish communities, and it has the fastest growing Jewish immigrant population of any country in the world outside Israel. By sharing the life stories of members of one Jewish family—the Kalmans—Y. Michal Bodemann provides an intimate look at what it is like to live as a Jew in Germany today. Having survived concentration camps in Poland, four Kalman siblings—three brothers and a sister—were left stranded in Germany after the war. They built new lives and a major enterprise; they each married and had children. Over the past fifteen years Bodemann conducted extensive interviews with the Kalmans, mostly with the survivors’ ten children, who were born between 1948 and 1964. In these oral histories, he shares their thoughts on Judaism, work, family, and community. Staying in Germany is not a given; four of the ten cousins live in Israel and the United States.
Among the Kalman cousins are an art gallery owner, a body builder, a radio personality, a former chief financial officer of a prominent U.S. bank, and a sculptor. They discuss Zionism, anti-Semitism, what it means to root for the German soccer team, Schindler’s List, money, success, marriage and intermarriage, and family history. They reveal their different levels of engagement with Judaism and involvement with local Jewish communities. Kalman is a pseudonym, and their anonymity allows the family members to talk with passion and candor about their relationships and their lives as Jews.
Date: 1993
Abstract: The theoretical emphasis in this thesis is on the ideas that people have regarding
the sociocultural construct of human nature. Regarded as a construct whose form
and content is intrinsically connected to economic, historic and sociocultural factors,
the thesis attempts to explain how specific circumstances have caused the orthodox
Jewish community of Gateshead to re-negotiate and crystallize the concept of
human nature in their quest to live ethical and moral lives. In the last fifty years
this community has become known as a prominent centre for higher rabbinical
studies and attracts students from all over the world. Apart from its high
intellectual standards it has also gained a reputation as harbouring members who
are devoted to inter-personal ethics. The contention of this thesis is that the
community's level of compliance to such behaviours requires an awareness and a
well-defined notion of one's "inner" self and its various components that govern the
process of moral and ethical conduct.
Underpinning a wide range of sociocultural activities the thesis deals in particular
with the way in which ideas of human nature are inherent to the content and form
of indigenous educational theory. The process of child-rearing not only ensures the
reproduction of competent sociocultural members, it also aids the child in acquiring
an understanding of its "inner" self. The latter is in Gateshead defined as the locus
of personal and individual responsibility and is consequently vital in making the child
aware of its potentiality for moral conduct.
By carefully analyzing mother-child interactions it is revealed how the structure and
content of these interactions are organized by and expressive of inherent ideas
concerning the concept of human nature. Through active participation in these
interaction sequences the child is provided with an opportunity to construct and
acquire an understanding of itself as a moral agent.
Author(s): Frank, Fiona
Date: 2012
Abstract: This thesis casts new light on the immigrant experience, focusing on one extended Scottish Jewish family, the descendents of Rabbi Zvi David Hoppenstein and his wife Sophia, who arrived in Scotland in the early 1880s. Going further than other studies by exploring connections and difference through five generations and across five branches of the family, it uses grounded theory and a feminist perspective and draws on secondary sources like census data and contemporary newspaper reports with the early immigrant generations, oral testimony with the third and fourth generations and an innovative use of social networking platforms to engage with the younger generation. It explores Bourdieu’s theories relating to cultural and economic capital and the main themes are examined through the triple lens of generational change, gender and class. The thesis draws out links between food and memory and examines outmarriage and ‘return inmarriage’. It explores the fact that antisemitic and negative reactions from the host community, changing in nature through the generations but always present, have had an effect on people’s sense of their Jewish identity just as much as has the transmission of Jewish identity at home, in the synagogue, in Hebrew classes and in Jewish political, educational, leisure and welfare organisations. It makes an important link between gendered educational opportunities and consequent gendered intergenerational class shift, challenges other studies which view Jewish identity as static and illustrates how the boundary between ‘insider’ and ‘outsider’ is blurred: the Hoppenstein family offers us a context where we can see clearly how insider and outsider status can be self-assigned, ascribed by others, or mediated by internal gatekeepers.
Date: 2015
Abstract: Viele Jüdinnen und Juden lieben nichtjüdische Partner_innen, leben und haben Kinder mit ihnen. Die Vorstellung von ‚Juden‘ und ‚Nichtjuden‘ als klar unterscheidbaren Gruppen ist überholt. ‚Gemischte‘ Familien und Partnerschaften sind stattdessen Teil der zeitgenössischen Lebensrealität im deutschsprachigen Raum und darüber hinaus.

Der nicht unumstrittene Begriff des Hybriden, ursprünglich aus Botanik und Biologie entlehnt und im 19. Jahrhundert in die Rassenlehre übernommen, wo er negativ besetzt wurde, findet seit einigen Jahren in diversen Bereichen der Geistes-, Kultur- und Sozialwissenschaften wieder Verwendung. Dort richtet sich das Interesse auf Begegnungen, Vermischungen, Übergänge, Übersetzungen und Neuschöpfungen. Daraus entstehen Fragen nach Inklusion und Exklusion, welche Formen ‚Vermischungen‘ oder ‚Hybridisierungen‘ in konkreten Kontexten annehmen und in welchen kulturellen Praktiken und Identitätskonstruktionen sich diese äußern. Solche Fragen stellen sich auch für zeitgenössische jüdische Lebensentwürfe: Versteht man Identitäten als reflexive Prozesse des Selbstverstehens, des Entwickelns von sich immer in Veränderung befindlichen Selbstbildern und als eine Beziehung, zeigt sich, wie bedeutsam der Kontakt mit anderen und das Erfahren von Fremdwahrnehmung durch andere ist. Widersprüchliche Definitionen von Jüdischsein führen hier zu Herausforderungen für gemischte Familien. Die Komplexität resultiert u.a. aus den verschiedenen Ebenen zeitgenössischer jüdischer Identität, wie der kulturellen, der religiösen und nach der Shoah der historischen Ebene der Familien- und Verfolgungsgeschichte.

Der Band Hybride jüdische Identitäten versammelt die Vorträge der gleichnamigen internationalen Tagung, die im November 2012 am Erziehungswissenschaftlichen Institut der Universität Zürich stattgefunden hat. Die Autor_innen bringen nicht nur Perspektiven unterschiedlicher wissenschaftlicher Disziplinen, wie der Psychologie, der Soziologie, der Kultur- und Literaturwissenschaft sowie der Psychoanalyse zusammen, sondern untersuchen auch unterschiedliche nationale Zusammenhänge und Spezifika. Der Sammelband bündelt damit erstmalig Forschungen zu gemischt jüdisch-nichtjüdischen Familien und deren Selbstverständnissen und Erfahrungen.

Inhalt:

Lea Wohl von Haselberg: Einleitung 7
Micha Brumlik: Matrilinearität im Judentum. Ein religionshistorischer Essay19
Elisabeth Beck-Gernsheim: Juden, Nichtjuden und die dazwischen. Im Dschungel der Orientierungsversuche 35
Christina von Braun: Virtuelle Genealogien 49
Christa Wohl: Patrilineare in Deutschland: Jüdisch oder nicht? Eine psychologische Untersuchung 65
Birgitta Scherhans: Jüdisch-christliche ‚Mischehen‘ in Deutschland nach 1945 83
Madeleine Dreyfus: ‚Mischehe‘ und Übertritt. Elemente jüdischer Identitätskonstruktionen am Beispiel der deutschen Schweiz 103
Catherine Grandsard: Approximate Answers to Baffling Problems. Issues of Identity in Mixed Jewish-Christian Families in France 121
Adrian Wójcik/Michał Bilewicz: Beyond Ethnicity. The Role of the Mixed-Origin Family for Jewish Identity: A Polish Case Study 133
Pearl Beck: The Relationship between Intermarriage and Jewish Identity in the United States. An Examination of Overall Trends and Specific Research Findings 147
Joela Jacobs: Die Frage nach dem Bindestrich. Deutsch-jüdische Identitäten und Literatur 169
Date: 2011
Abstract: There has been a Jewish community in Greater Manchester since the early 19th
Century. Greater numbers of people migrated to the area during and after the
Second World War when refugees and survivors of the Holocaust settled in a number
of the boroughs. Indeed, the largest Orthodox Jewish community outside London is
situated within the boundaries of Salford, Bury and Manchester. The overall aim of
this study was to provide an assessment of the housing needs of Jewish
communities in Greater Manchester.

In particular, the study aimed to do the following:
o Map population change, household sizes, ages and the location, size and
types of housing occupied by Jewish households;
o Examine whether there has been significant movement of the Jewish
community (domestically and internationally);
o Identify a range of demographic trends amongst the sample population,
including housing circumstances and characteristics; economic activity, age,
employment, education / study, membership of a synagogue and the particular
denomination;
o Identify any housing needs relating to health, disability, age of the individual,
condition of the property, security of tenure, appropriateness of location,
proximity of the property to a place of worship, community infrastructure and
retail provision;
o Explore economic circumstances and housing costs, particularly in relation to
the financial capacity of the household and whether housing costs are being
met, whether the household has any affordability issues relating to its housing
needs now and in the future, and what barriers exist to specific housing
products such as affordable housing;
o Identify housing expectations, looking specifically at the type, tenure, location
and size of housing the household might expect in the short term future at
intervals of 5 years and 10 years;
o Explore future aspirations, focusing on longer term needs and aspirations of
the household including need arising from childbirth, aging; needs related to
health, disability or other factors over the next 5 years and the next 10 years;
o Assess the extent to which lifestyle, level of practice of religion or other
reasons motivate or demotivate household movement;
o Assess whether the existing home meets the current needs including religious
and cultural needs; and
o Measure the level of community cohesion with the wider community in
Manchester and measure the extent of anti-social behaviour, harassment,
incidence and fear of crime.

The study was commissioned by Manchester Jewish Housing Association in
December 2010 and was conducted by a team of researchers from the Salford
Housing & Urban Studies Unit (SHUSU) at the University of Salford. The study was
greatly aided by research support from a number of community interviewers and was
managed by a steering group composed of representatives of Manchester Jewish
Housing Association, Bury Council, Manchester City Council and Salford City
Council.
Editor(s): Danieli, Yael
Date: 1998
Date: 2007
Abstract: Die jüdische Zuwanderung erfolgt häufig im Familienverbund, die Geschlechts- und Altersstruktur ist gleichmäßig. Damit ist die demographische Struktur der jüdischen Zuwanderer typisch für eine klassische Auswanderung und unterscheidet sich deutlich von der Alters- und Geschlechtszusammensetzung bei Arbeitsmigranten.

Ein beträchtlicher Anteil der jüdischen Zuwanderer ist eigenen Angaben zufolge nicht jüdischer Abstammung und äußert auch keine Zugehörigkeit zur jüdischen Religion. Dies weist auf einen hohen Anteil an interethnischen Ehen hin. Die Familien- und Verwandtschaftsstruktur gibt Hinweise auf eine gute soziale Einbettung in lokale Verwandtschaftsnetzwerke.

Überdurchschnittliches Bildungsniveau der jüdischen Zuwanderer
Hinsichtlich der Berufsstruktur unterscheiden sich jüdische Zuwanderer sowohl von klassischen Arbeitsmigranten, die vor allem im Arbeitsmarktsegment mit niedrigen Qualifikati-onsanforderungen beschäftigt sind, als auch von Spätaussiedlern und der deutschen Allgemeinbevölkerung. Denn sie weisen ein überdurchschnittlich hohes Niveau der Bildungs- und Berufsqualifikation auf. Ein sehr hoher Anteil im erwerbsfähigen Alter hat einen wissenschaftlichen Beruf erlernt und im Herkunftsland ausgeübt.

Angesichts des relativ hohen Qualifikationsniveaus der jüdischen Zuwanderer scheint es besonders wichtig zu sein, dass die Berufsabschlüsse und die Berufserfahrungen anerkannt werden, wozu häufig eine Weiterqualifizierung notwendig sein wird. Unter der Bedingung des Erwerbs deutscher Sprachkenntnisse bieten die Ressourcen dieser Zuwanderergruppe bei geeigneter Förderung grundsätzlich gute Voraussetzungen für eine Integration in den Arbeitsmarkt.

Die hier vorliegende Beschreibung der demographischen Merkmale, der Nationalitäts- und Religionszugehörigkeit, der Berufsstruktur und der Verwandtschaftsnetzwerke beruht auf den Daten der 1.061 jüdischen Zuwanderer, die im Jahr 2005 in der Landesaufnahmestelle des Freistaates Bayern eingetroffen sind.
Author(s): Faure, Laurence
Date: 2010
Date: 2015
Abstract: An innovative study looking at UK census data through the lens of the household – or Jewish family – shows that only a quarter of all Jewish homes are comprised of the stereotypical married couple with children, and two out of three Jewish households in Britain have no children living in them at all. It further demonstrates that an estimated 17,600 Jews aged 65 or above live alone, the majority of whom are women.

The report, entitled Jewish families and Jewish households: Census insights into how we live, is the latest in a series of reports published by JPR that draw on data from the 2011 Census to understand key aspects of contemporary Jewish life in Britain. It is the most comprehensive report on these data published so far, and reveals a number of important insights, hitherto unknown.

Amongst these, it demonstrates that a third of all Jewish households have people living within them who are either not Jewish, or whose Jewish status is unclear. On the face of it, this represents little change over the decade since 2001, but close examination of the data indicate that there has been an increase in the number of Jews living with people who say they have no religion, alongside a decrease in the number of Jews living with people who have a different religion.

The report also investigates differences in household make-up between Jews and other religious and ethnic minorities, and demonstrates that Jews are far less likely than average to cohabit or to live in single parent families – a finding which indicates that the traditional Jewish family is holding up relatively well in the face of general changes in family formation habits in Britain. On the other hand, a higher proportion of Jewish households have people aged 65 or over living alone in them than British households in general, or for that matter, the households of almost every other minority group in the UK.

In addition, household data from the census provide valuable insights into the lives of students and young adults, revealing that there are more Jewish students based in Gateshead than any other city in the UK. Nottingham and Birmingham follow quite closely behind, and both Oxford and Cambridge feature among the top seven locations for Jewish students. One in five young adults aged 25-29 still live with their parents, and the proportion in that age group living alone declined by about a third between 2001 and 2011, probably due to issues around affordability.