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Date: 2019
Abstract: В статье, опубликованной в выпуске № 15 EAJ Policy papers, Олаф Глокнер перечисляет проблемы, с которыми столкнулось первое поколение русскоязычных евреев-иммигрантов в Германии. Однако завершает свой анализ позитивными перспективами развития еврейской общины этой страны. Насколько его оптимизм оправдан? Похоже, что отчужденность евреев-иммигрантов в Германии от местного общества и еврейских общин оказалась даже глубже, чем казалось ранее, и в каком-то смысле охватывает и намного более профессионально и культурно интегрированное поколение молодого и раннего среднего возраста. Потому в Европе более чем в других местах сохранение русско-еврейского самосознания является фактором сохранения еврейской идентичности вообще. Альтернативой ей является усвоение не столько «местного еврейского» сколько собственно нееврейского гражданского идентификационного компонента. Смогут ли транснациональные зонтичные еврейские структуры ответить на этот вызов, пока «поезд» еще окончательно не ушел?
Date: 2011
Abstract: Democratic polities continue to be faced with politics of resentment. Along with resurgent counter-cosmopolitanism and anti-immigrant prejudice, various political agents have mobilized old and modernized antisemitism in European democracies. The first comparative study of its kind, this book rigorously examines the contemporary relevance of antisemitism and other politicized resentments in the context of the European Union and beyond. Presenting new approaches and state-of-the-art research by leading authorities in the field, the volume combines comparative work and political theorizing with ten single country studies using qualitative and quantitative data from Eastern and Western Europe. The result is a new and sober set of arguments and findings, demonstrating that antisemitism and counter-cosmopolitan resentment are still all too present human rights challenges in today’s cosmopolitan Europe.

Contents:

I. Foundations
Politics and Resentment: Examining Antisemitism and Counter-Cosmopolitanism in the European Union and Beyond
Lars Rensmann & Julius H. Schoeps
II. European Comparisons
Is There a New “European Antisemitism”? Public Opinion and Comparative Empirical Research in Europe
Werner Bergmann
“Against Globalism”: Counter-Cosmopolitan Discontent and Antisemitism in Mobilizations of European Extreme Right Parties
Lars Rensmann
Antisemitism and Anti-Americanism: Comparative European Perspectives
Andrei S. Markovits
Playing the Nazi-Card: Israel, Jews, and Antisemitism
Paul Iganski & Abe Sweiry
III. Eastern Europe
The Empire Strikes Back: Antisemitism in Russia
Stella Rock & Alexander Verkhovsky
Hatred Towards Jews as a Political Code? Antisemitism in Hungary
András Kovács
The Resilience of Legacies: Antisemitism in Poland and the Ukraine
Ireneusz Krzemiński
IV. Western Europe
Beyond the Republican Model: Antisemitism in France
Jean-Yves Camus
The Liberal Tradition and Unholy Alliances of the Present: Antisemitism in the United Kingdom
Michael Whine
Political Cultures of Denial? Antisemitism in Sweden and Scandinavia
Henrik Bachner
Erosion of a Taboo: Antisemitism in Switzerland
Christina Späti
Anti-Jewish Guilt Deflection and National Self-Victimization: Antisemitism in Germany
Samuel Salzborn
V. Epilogue
Theorizing Antisemitism and Counter-Cosmopolitanism in the Global Age: A Political Crisis of Postmodernity?
Lars Rensmann
Date: 2013
Abstract: Abstract There is a very small, yet important minority within the community of European Union kosher consumers. There is a great deal of research regarding objective aspects of the kosher religious as well as civil laws and their implementation, but comparatively little research about the subjective attitudes, opinions, and concerns of those who actually purchase and consume kosher food. Such information can be important for a variety of interested parties including suppliers, distributors, regulatory agencies, legislators, and certifying agencies as well as religious authorities. We collected relevant data by organizing hour-long Focus Groups (FG) in five European cities and a suburb of Tel Aviv. The FG addressed consumer attitudes related to shopping practices, commitment, trust, and certification as well as their knowledge and opinions regarding nonhuman animal welfare as it relates to shechita (kosher slaughter) and knowledge of the issue of stunning animals at the time of killing. One of the significant findings was a high level of secularization among Jews that translates to a low level of commitment to eating kosher. But this was accompanied by assertions that eating kosher was an important religious obligation and complaints of low availability and high cost. There was a strong feeling, even among those less committed to eating kosher, that shechita was the preferred method of slaughtering an animal (more animal friendly) and a strong suspicion of anti-Semitism as a motivation for any attempt to impose a stunning obligation.
Date: 2009
Abstract: The European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights presents its 5th brief
update of its 2004 report “Manifestations of anti-Semitism in the EU”. The
overview contains the latest governmental and non-governmental
statistical data covering 2001 to 2008 for those EU Member States that
have official or unofficial data and statistics on anti-Semitic incidents. The
Agency collects regularly publicly available official and unofficial data and
information on racism and xenophobia in the EU Member States through
its Racism and Xenophobia Network (RAXEN) with a special focus on
anti-Semitism.

The Agency’s data collection work shows that most Member States do not
have official or even unofficial data and statistics on anti-Semitic incidents.
Even where data exist they are not comparable, since they are collected
following different methodologies. For some countries, RAXEN National
Focal Points provide the Agency with lists of cases collected either ad hoc
by civil society organisations or through the media with varying degrees of
validity and reliability. Detailed data and incidents lists are presented in the
FRA electronic database, Info_Portal at http://infoportal.fra.europa.eu.
The Agency’s regular review of data collection systems indicates that most
Member States have a serious problem of underreporting, particularly in
reference to official systems of data collection that are based on police
records and on crime and law statistics, because not all anti-Semitic
incidents registered officially are categorised under the label “antiSemitism”
and/or because not all anti-Semitic incidents are reported to the
official body by the victims or witnesses of an incident.

A complementary problem to underreporting is misreporting and overreporting:
This could be the case in unofficial data collection carried out by
organisations that do not provide information concerning their
methodologies.
Date: 2004
Abstract: Following concerns from many quarters over what seemed to be a serious
increase in acts of antisemitism in some parts of Europe especially in March and
April 2002, the EUMC asked the 15 National Focal Points of its Racism and
Xenophobia Network (RAXEN) to direct a special focus on antisemitism in its
data collection activities.

One of the outcomes of that initiative is the comprehensive report
“Manifestations of Antisemitism in the EU 2002-2003.” The information from
the RAXEN network enabled the EUMC to present, for the first time in the EU,
data on antisemitism that has been collected systematically, using common
guidelines for each Member State. The main report provides an overview of
incidents of antisemitism and examples of good practice to combat antisemitism
from information available in the years 2002 – 2003, and a thorough analysis of
the data, as well as proposals for action to combat antisemitism.

As part of the same initiative the EUMC also commissioned this present report.
It consists of material from in-depth interviews with 35 persons from Jewish
communities in eight European countries, covering their own perceptions of
antisemitism. It is not meant to supply an objective, academic analysis. Instead
its aim is to present a snapshot of views of people from Jewish communities in
Europe, their experiences, concerns and expectations. In this way, the
qualitative material from the interviews adds personal insights to the statistical
and descriptive material in the main report. This report is complementary to the
main report and should be read in conjunction with it.
Date: 2004
Abstract: Following concerns from many quarters over what seemed to be a serious
increase in acts of antisemitism in some parts of Europe, especially in
March/April 2002, the EUMC asked the 15 National Focal Points of its Racism
and Xenophobia Network (RAXEN) to direct a special focus on antisemitism in
its data collection activities. This comprehensive report is one of the outcomes
of that initiative. It represents the first time in the EU that data on antisemitism
has been collected systematically, using common guidelines for each Member
State.

The national reports delivered by the RAXEN network provide an overview of
incidents of antisemitism, the political, academic and media reactions to it,
information from public opinion polls and attitude surveys, and examples of
good practice to combat antisemitism, from information available in the years
2002 – 2003.

On receipt of these national reports, the EUMC then asked an independent
scholar, Dr Alexander Pollak, to make an evaluation of the quality and
availability of this data on antisemitism in each country, and identify problem
areas and gaps. The country-by-country information provided by the 15
National Focal Points, and the analysis by Dr Pollak, form Chapter 1 and
Chapter 2 of this report respectively.

Finally, in the light of the information and analysis provided by this exercise,
the report concludes with a number of proposals for action to the EU and its
Member States on concrete measures to combat antisemitism, including legal
and educational measures, and recommendations for improving the monitoring
and recording of antisemitic incidents.