Search results

Your search found 683 items
Previous | Next
Sort: Relevance | Topics | Title | Author | Publication Year
turned off because more than 500 resultsView all
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 > >>
Home  / Search Results
Date: 2020
Author(s): Poulton, Emma
Date: 2019
Abstract: While the anti-racist movement in English football has been established for 25 years, antisemitism was not specifically addressed until much later – most publicly through anti-discrimination organisation Kick It Out’s The Y-Word (2011) film campaigning against the use of ‘Yid’ in football fan culture. Antisemitism has occupied a sporadic position on football’s wider anti-racism agenda. Antisemitism in football is also a neglected area of research. The article addresses this academic indifference by contributing a critical analysis of the intermittent responses to antisemitism in English men’s football – by governing bodies, campaigners, and the criminal justice system – using a multiple streams approach to understand policy formulation, legitimation and implementation, arguing these attempts have usually been reactive and sometimes misguided, inconsistent, or misaligned with existing legislation. The role of ‘policy entrepreneurs’ is considered in relation to individuals lobbying for and influencing the priority of tackling formations of antisemitism amidst broader attempts to combat racism and faith-based abuse in football. This empirically-grounded critical analysis is informed by primary data from interviews with elite stakeholders from English football (The Football Association; Kick It Out) and Jewish community (Board of Deputies of British Jews; Jewish Leadership Council; Community Security Trust; Maccabi GB). The article explains the changing political salience of combating antisemitism and concludes with a call for a more congruous and coherent approach to addressing antisemitism, faith-based abuse and other forms of discrimination in football, which might lend itself to other sports and contexts. It also critiques the utility of the multiple streams approach.
Author(s): Allington, Daniel
Date: 2020
Date: 2010
Abstract: Loin d’avoir disparu, la haine des Juifs est entrée dans un nouveau régime en se fixant sur Israël, cible d’une guerre médiatique de haute intensité. L’antisionisme radical, dont l’objectif est la destruction de l’État juif, représente en effet la dernière figure historique prise par la judéophobie. À ce titre, négatrice du droit à l’existence d’une nation, elle constitue l’une des principales formes contemporaines du racisme. Pour comprendre comment s’est accomplie la mondialisation de cette nouvelle configuration antijuive, l’auteur dissèque le nouveau discours de propagande des ennemis déclarés d’Israël tel qu’il s’est développé au cours des années 2000-2010. La nouvelle vision antijuive, qui consiste à « nazifier » les « sionistes » en tant qu’« agresseurs » et à « judaïser » corrélativement les Palestiniens en tant que « victimes », permet d’accuser les « sionistes » de « génocide » ou de « palestinocide ». Ce discours de propagande est replacé dans son contexte international, marqué par une menace islamiste centrée sur l’appel au jihad contre les Juifs.

Analysant divers matériaux symboliques exploités par la nouvelle propagande antijuive — images ou discours —, P.-A. Taguieff donne à comprendre comment et pourquoi la haine des Juifs, plus d’un demi-siècle après la Shoah, a pu renaître sous les habits neufs de l’« antiracisme » et de l’« anticolonialisme » et, grâce aux médias, se diffuser en recueillant l’assentiment d’individus parfois convaincus d’être étrangers à tout préjugé antijuif.
Author(s): Burke, Shani
Date: 2017
Abstract: This thesis uses critical discursive psychology to analyse anti-Semitic and Islamophobic discourse on the Facebook pages of two far-right organisations: Britain First and the English Defence League. Using the Charlie Hebdo attack as a time frame, I examine how the far-right manage their identity and maintain rationality online, as well as how users on Facebook respond to the far-right. This thesis demonstrates how Britain First and the English Defence League present themselves as reasonable in their anti-Semitic and anti-Islamic stance following the Charlie Hebdo shooting. Ultimately, I bring together the study of fascist discourse and political discourse on social media using critical discursive psychology, in a novel synthesis. The Charlie Hebdo shooting and the shooting at the kosher supermarket in Paris in January 2015 (as well as other attacks by members of the Islamic State) have led to Muslims being seen as a threat to Britain, and thus Muslims have been exposed to Islamophobic attacks and racial abuse. The current climate is a challenging situation for the far-right, as they are presented with the dilemma of appearing as rational and even mainstream, whilst nevertheless adopting an anti-Islamic stance. The analysis focuses on how Britain First and the English Defence League used the shooting at the Kosher supermarket to align with Jews in order to construct them as under threat from Islam, and promote its anti-Islamic stance. I also analyse visual communication used by Britain First to provide evidence that Britain First supported Jewish communities. Discourse from Facebook users transitioned from supportive towards Jews, to questioning the benefits that Jews brought to Britain, and expressing Holocaust denial. Furthermore, I discuss how other far-right politicians in Europe such as Geert Wilders from the Dutch Party for Freedom, portrayed himself as a reasonable politician in the anti-Islamic stance he has taken in the wake of the Charlie Hebdo attack. Findings are discussed in light of how the far-right communicate about the Charlie Hebdo shooting whilst maintaining a reasonable stance when projecting anti-Semitic and Islamophobic ideology, and how such discourse can encompass hate speech. I demonstrate how critical discursive psychology can be used to show how various conflicting social identities are constructed and interact with each other online. This thesis shows how the far-right use aligning with Jews as means to present Muslims as problematic, and how such alignment has resulted in the marginalisation of both Jews and Muslims.
Date: 2009
Abstract: Placards carrying images of swastikas superimposed on the Star of David and the Israeli flag were commonplace in street-level protests about the recent Israeli military actions and the conflict in Gaza in December 2008 and January 2009. Allusions between Nazi genocidal practices and the activities of the Israeli state were also drawn in some of the speeches at protest meetings and press commentary on the conflict. Although this was not the first occasion that the ‘Nazi card’ had been played against Israel and Jews, the prevalence of the phenomenon appears to indicate its growing normalisation. Playing the ‘Nazi card’ is a discursive act involving the use of Nazi or related terms or symbols (Nazism, Hitler, swastikas, etc.) in reference to Jews, Israel, Zionism or aspects of the Jewish experience. It manifests in words uttered in speech or in writing, or in visual representations such as artwork, drawings, caricatures, cartoons, graffiti, daubings and scratchings, or visual expressions such as a Nazi salute or the clicking of heels. In many instances, the playing of the Nazi card is unquestionably antisemitic. However, the inclusion of particular modes of criticism of Israel in definitions of antisemitism has provoked controversy. The result has been a war of words which has stagnated into an intellectual and discursive cul-de-sac of claim and counter-claim about what does and does not qualify as antisemitism. Because of this, in focusing on discourse, this report attempts to shift the focus of analysis of contemporary antisemitism onto new ground: away from labelling and defining the problem, to an understanding of the consequences of particular discourse. By unravelling and dissecting various manifestations of the phenomenon, the report reveals how the playing of the Nazi card scratches deep wounds by invoking painful collective memory of the Holocaust. It also offers some recommendations as to how the problem might be addressed.
Date: 2020
Date: 2016
Abstract: Der Fachkräfteaustausch "Commitment without Borders – Transnational Network against Antisemitism" zwischen Deutschland und der Türkei ist ein Partnerprojekt von KIgA und den Organisationen Toplum Gönüllüleri Vakfi (TOG) und Karakutu („Blackbox“) aus Istanbul. Das Projekt befasst sich mit den unterschiedlichen Erfahrungen, Herausforderungen und Chancen von historisch-politischer Bildung zum Holocaust und der kritischen Auseinandersetzung mit Antisemitismus in beiden Ländern.

Im gegenseitigen Austausch erkunden Praktiker_innen aus Wissenschaft, außerschulischer Bildung und Gedenkstättenpädagogik die Geschichte und Gegenwart von Vorurteilen, Diskriminierung und politischer Gewalt sowie der Erinnerungskulturen in den jeweiligen nationalen Kontexten. Im Rahmen gemeinsamer Studienreisen, Workshops und Fachtagungen setzen sie sich mit aktuellen Diskursen auseinander, lernen pädagogische Akteure, Ansätze und Methoden kennen und entwickeln gemeinsam Handlungsstrategien. Erste Ergebnisse aus dem gemeinschaftlichen Lern- und Arbeitsprozess werden in Form der vorliegenden Publikation zugänglich gemacht.

Im ersten Kapitel mit dem Titel "Theorie Antisemitismus und Holocaust Education – Hintergründe und Diskurse" vermitteln Projektteilnehmer_innen Einblicke in Diskurse und zeigen die unterschiedlichen gesellschaftlichen Voraussetzungen in der Türkei und in Deutschland auf.

Das zweite Kapitel mit dem Titel "Praxis Einblicke in die pädagogische Arbeit" umfasst die Darstellung einiger der Methoden, die im Laufe des Projektes durchgeführt, diskutiert und bearbeitet wurden. Der Auswahl liegt der Wunsch nach Vermittlung einer möglichst großen Diversität von pädagogische-didaktischen Zugängen wie auch inhaltlichen Bezügen des Themenfelds zugrunde.

Das dritte Kapitel mit dem Titel "Reflexionen Rückblicke auf das Projekt und Ausblicke in die Zukunft" bezieht sich auf den diskursiven und produktiven Charakter des Projekts. Es spiegelt die kritischen Reflexionen und intensiven Diskussionen zu den im Laufe des Projektes vorgestellten, angedachten und besprochenen Inhalten und gibt somit einen vertieften Einblick in die partnerschaftliche Arbeit und den intensiven Austausch.

Die Publikation schließt mit einem Serviceteil, in dem sich die Projektpartner in beiden Ländern vorstellen.
Date: 2003
Date: 2020
Abstract: In this article, we conduct a comprehensive study of online antagonistic content related to Jewish identity posted on Twitter between October 2015 and October 2016 by UK-based users. We trained a scalable supervised machine learning classifier to identify antisemitic content to reveal patterns of online antisemitism perpetration at the source. We built statistical models to analyze the inhibiting and enabling factors of the size (number of retweets) and survival (duration of retweets) of information flows in addition to the production of online antagonistic content. Despite observing high temporal variability, we found that only a small proportion (0.7%) of the content was antagonistic. We also found that antagonistic content was less likely to disseminate in size or survive for a longer period. Information flows from antisemitic agents on Twitter gained less traction, while information flows emanating from capable and willing counter-speech actors—that is, Jewish organizations—had a significantly higher size and survival rates. This study is the first to demonstrate that Sampson’s classic sociological concept of collective efficacy can be observed on social media (SM). Our findings suggest that when organizations aiming to counter harmful narratives become active on SM platforms, their messages propagate further and achieve greater longevity than antagonistic messages. On SM, counter-speech posted by credible, capable and willing actors can be an effective measure to prevent harmful narratives. Based on our findings, we underline the value of the work by community organizations in reducing the propagation of cyberhate and increasing trust in SM platforms.
Editor(s): Kucia, Marek
Date: 2011
Translated Title: On a new antisemitic moment
Author(s): Birnbaum, Pierre
Date: 2015
Author(s): Birnbaum, Pierre
Date: 2000
Date: 2016
Author(s): Knobel, Marc
Date: 2013
Abstract: La France n’est pas un pays raciste ou antisémite. Il n’y existe plus d’antisémitisme institutionnalisé comme cela fut le cas dans les années 40. Il faut donc éviter de dresser des comparaisons obscènes avec l’Occupation et la Shoah, mais on ne peut que constater que les violences, allant jusqu’à l’assassinat, et les menaces contre les juifs et leurs institutions, ont considérablement augmenté depuis l’année 2000.

Marc Knobel explique pourquoi les choses se sont envenimées à ce point, quelquefois dans l’indifférence des politiques et des médias. Il ne convient pas de faire de l’angélisme et d’ignorer la réalité. L’hostilité à l’endroit des juifs s’est largement développée chez les jeunes qui vivent dans des quartiers dits sensibles et qui, souvent discriminés ou victimisés, sont en quête d’identité et s’identifient aux Palestiniens.

Ils glissent très vite de l’antisionisme à l’antisémitisme, d’Israël à Juifs. Le conflit israélo-palestinien joue donc ici un rôle majeur. Notons que ce conflit sert aussi d’alibi à l’expression de l’antisémitisme dans des milieux plus privilégiés culturellement et socialement. De plus, les islamistes font des banlieues défavorisées le lieu préféré de diffusion de leurs idées. Dans les prêches ou à travers Internet, ils présentent une vision d’un Islam qui serait assiégé, menacé par les Américains, les Européens et les juifs.

Cette vision complotiste du monde est d’autant plus grave que de jeunes déshérités entendent et lisent régulièrement leur propagande, s’en nourrissent en pensant y trouver l’explication de leur désarroi dans une société qui n’a pas su les intégrer. Les antisémites pensent que les juifs sont protégés, ils imaginent qu’ils sont tous riches et puissants. Les vieux stéréotypes sont là. L’antisémitisme, tout comme toute autre forme de racisme, est inacceptable.

Il est une injure à la République et ses effets peuvent se révéler dramatiquement, car ceux qui utilisent et manient l’antisémitisme s’illustrent par leurs appels incessants à la haine, à la violence et au meurtre.
Date: 2020
Author(s): Kalmar, Ivan
Date: 2020
Author(s): Sherwood, Yvonne
Date: 2020