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Editor(s): Shainkman, Mikael
Date: 2018
Abstract: This book illustrates the two clear trends in antisemitism today: “old” antisemitism, based in religious and racist prejudices, which has largely disappeared from public discourse in the West after the defeat of Nazi Germany, but has resurfaced in the last quarter-century in the face of right wing frustration of weakening nation states in a globalized world; and “new” antisemitism, or the antisemitic narrativization of Israel, which is most commonly found on the Left, in the Muslim world, and in the post-colonial discourse. This collection of essays analyzes both old and new antisemitisms, in order to understand their place in the world of today and tomorrow. It is written by experts in the field of antisemitism working for, or connected with, the Kantor Center for the Study of Contemporary European Jewry at Tel Aviv University. Table of Contents Acknowledgments Introduction: The Continuity and Change of Antisemitism Mikael Shainkman Different Antisemitisms: On Three Distinct Forms of Antisemitism in Contemporary Europe, with a Special Focus on Sweden Lars Dencik and Karl Marosi Holocaust Memory and Holocaust Revisionism in Poland and Moldova: A Comparison Natalia Sineaeva-Pankowska Honoring the Collaborators: The Ukrainian Case Irena Cantorovich The Rise of the Radical Right in Europe and the Jews Michael Whine The Worrisome Defiance of the Golden Dawn Michal Navoth The Struggle over the International Working Definition of Antisemitism Dina Porat Discrimination against Muslims and Antisemitic Views among Young Muslims in Europe Günther Jikeli Debates on Islamized Antisemitism in Austria in the Wake of the Israel-Gaza Conflict, 2014 Julia Edthofer Antisemitism and the Struggle for the “Good” Society: Ambivalent Responses to Antisemitic Attitudes and Ideas in the 2014 Swedish Electoral Race Kristin Wagrell Mohamed Omar and the Selective Detection of Non-Nazi Antisemitism Mathan Ravid After the Charlie Hebdo Attack: The Line between Freedom of Expression and Hate Speech Andre Oboler Online Antisemitic Propaganda and Negationism in the Islamic Republic of Iran: Ahmadinejad and His Enduring Legacy Liora Hendelman-Baavur The Nisman Case: Its Impact on the Jewish Community and on National Politics in Argentina Adrian Gruszniewski and Lidia Lerner Venezuela’s 2012 Presidential Elections: Introducing Antisemitism into Venezuelan Political Discourse Lidia Lerner
Author(s): Staetsky, L. Daniel
Date: 2019
Abstract: Is criticism of Israel antisemitic? Do anti-Israel views and attitudes constitute a “new antisemitism”? These questions have occupied the minds of many academics and pubic intellectuals – both Jewish and non-Jewish – since the beginning of the twenty-first century. So far, no consensus has emerged. The definitions of antisemitism are many but all have been contested to varying degrees. This paper offers a brief survey of the definitions of antisemitism and the way in which these definitions accommodate anti-Israel and/or anti-Zionist views and attitudes. This is done, however, by way of introduction and without any assessment of the quality of the definitions in scientific terms, or their acceptability in political terms. The overview simply provides the background and the motivation for the main subject of the paper. The Jewish public’s perception of the link between antisemitism and anti-Israel/anti-Zionist attitudes forms the main focus of this paper. This is, to my knowledge, the first time that this subject has been treated in a strictly empirical, quantitative manner using large datasets.

What does the Jewish public, as opposed to the intellectual elite, think about the link between antisemitism and anti-Zionism? This question has so far remained unexplored, and in this paper I attempt to answer it utilising a newly created dataset. In summer 2012, a survey of experiences and perceptions of antisemitism among Jews took place in selected European countries.

Using advanced statistical techniques, it is possible to explore the extent to which the Jewish public makes a distinction between classic antisemitic and anti-Israel/anti-Zionist statements. Are anti-Israel/anti-Zionist statements perceived as antisemitic by Jews? Are they perceived to be antisemitic to the same extent as other, more classic, antisemitic statements? The paper addresses these questions focusing on the British and French samples of Jews, and comparing and contrasting insights produced by these two contexts.