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Date: 2018
Author(s): Scholefield, Lynne
Date: 1999
Abstract: Interpreting culture as symbols, stories, rituals and values, the thesis explores the culture of a Jewish and a Catholic secondary school in a dialogical way. The survey of the literature in Chapter 1 identifies relevant school-based research and locates the chosen case-study schools within the context of the British 'dual system'. Chapter 2 draws on the theoretical and methodological literatures of inter-faith dialogue and ethnography to develop and defend a paradigm for the research defined as open-inclusivist and constructivist. The main body of the thesis (Chapters 3-5), based on field-work undertaken in 1996 and 1997, presents the two schools in parallel with each other. Chapter 3 describes the details of the case studies at 'St. Margaret's' and 'Mount Sinai' and my developing research relationship with each school. In Chapter 4 many different voices from each school are woven into two 'tales' about the schools' cultures. This central chapter has a deliberately narrative style. Chapter 5 amplifies the cultural tales through the analysis of broadly quantitative data gained from an extensive questionnaire administered to a sample of senior students in each school. It is the only place in the thesis where views and values from the two schools are directly compared. The final two chapters widen the horizon of the study. Chapter 6 presents voices which were not part of the original case studies but which relate, in different ways, to the culture of the two schools. Chapter 7, with theoretical ideas about Jewish schools and education, and Catholic schools and education, provides resources for further dialogue about culture within Judaism and Catholicism and for Jewish-Christian dialogue. The thesis ends with some reflections on possible implications of the two cultures for discussions about the common good in education.
Author(s): Cohen, Martine
Date: 2000
Date: 2012
Date: 2010
Abstract: The main aims of the DIALREL project are to explore the conditions for promoting the
dialogue between interested parties and stakeholders and facilitating the adoption of good
religious slaughter practices. The additional aim is to review and propose a mechanism for
implementation and monitoring of good practices.

A work plan consisting of 6 work packages has been prepared (WP1 to WP6). The
implementation is to be achieved by consultations, gathering, exchanging and reviewing of
information and networking throughout. Dissemination activities are involving internet
site(s) for networking and organised workshops that provides the platform for debate,
exchange of information and consensus. www.dialrel.eu

This workpackage (WP3) is mainly devoted to building up a synthesis on halal and kosher
consumption as well as kosher and halal consumer attitudes, beliefs, and concerns towards
religious slaughter in selected European Union (EU) and associate countries. Although
some legal, animal health, and welfare aspects have been investigated so far, very few
studies have taken into account the consumption dimension. Therefore, WP3 aims to fill in
the lacuna in knowledge in this area by organizing targeted comparative studies on halal
and kosher consumption in Europe. The objective of this work package is to build on
available data, set up new or modified methodologies, and stimulate the exchange of views
that will lead to improved practices.

Activities of WP3 are intended to describe the current situation using available
information, and elaborate on new methodologies in order to facilitate systematic
collection and analysis of subsequent information in the future. This report explore
consumer concerns, knowledge, and information relating to the religious slaughter process
as well as halal and kosher products by gathering information and carrying out consumer
studies in member and associate countries using Focus Groups (FG) in seven countries
including five EU countries : Belgium, France, Germany, Israel, The Netherlands, Turkey
and United Kingdom.
Author(s): Sapiro, Philip
Date: 2016