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Author(s): Meng, Michael
Date: 2011
Abstract: After the Holocaust, the empty, silent spaces of bombed-out synagogues, cemeteries, and Jewish districts were all that was left in many German and Polish cities with prewar histories rich in the sights and sounds of Jewish life. What happened to this scarred landscape after the war, and how have Germans, Poles, and Jews encountered these ruins over the past sixty years?

In the postwar period, city officials swept away many sites, despite protests from Jewish leaders. But in the late 1970s church groups, local residents, political dissidents, and tourists demanded the preservation of the few ruins still standing. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1989, this desire to preserve and restore has grown stronger. In one of the most striking and little-studied shifts in postwar European history, the traces of a long-neglected Jewish past have gradually been recovered, thanks to the rise of heritage tourism, nostalgia for ruins, international discussions about the Holocaust, and a pervasive longing for cosmopolitanism in a globalizing world.

Examining this transformation from both sides of the Iron Curtain, Michael Meng finds no divided memory along West–East lines, but rather a shared memory of tensions and paradoxes that crosses borders throughout Central Europe. His narrative reveals the changing dynamics of the local and the transnational, as Germans, Poles, Americans, and Israelis confront a built environment that is inevitably altered with the passage of time. Shattered Spaces exemplifies urban history at its best, uncovering a surprising and moving postwar story of broad contemporary interest.
Author(s): Perra, Emiliano
Date: 2018
Date: 2015
Author(s): Nizard, Sophie
Date: 2012
Abstract: À partir des processus d’adoption par des parents juifs, Sophie Nizard révèle comment se disent l’histoire, la mémoire, la transmission, le rapport entre l’identité religieuse et familiale d’une part et le biologique ou l’hérédité d’autre part.
L’adoption est au croisement des problématiques de la transmission familiale, de la mémoire, et de la religion. Que devient dans ce contexte la transmission matrilinéaire de la judéité ? Par quelles voies les parents adoptants introduisent des enfants non biologiques dans les canaux de la filiation et de la transmission mémorielle ou religieuse du judaïsme ? À partir de cas d’adoption dans des familles juives pratiquantes et non pratiquantes, en France et en Israël, l’auteur met en évidence les enjeux et les complexités autour de ce qu’est être ou devenir juif aujourd’hui, , rend compte du parcours de l’adoption et des questions qu’elle soulève aux divers acteurs : institutions religieuses, organismes d’adoption, travailleurs sociaux, enfants adoptés et parents adoptifs. Elle livre une analyse fine et sensible de la parenté en monde juif, décrit les différences des contextes juridique et légal des deux pays. Cette comparaison permet de comprendre comment dans deux contextes extrêmement différents du point de vue des rapports entre le politique et le religieux, travaille la définition de l’appartenance : qu’est-ce qu’être français, qu’est-ce qu’être israélien, qu’est-ce qu’être juif dans les deux configurations ?

SOMMAIRE
Introduction : Entre parenté et judaïsme - L’adoption un objet partagé
Chapitre I. Filiation dans les textes et positions halakhiques contemporaines
L’impératif de la procréation et les récits de filiation dans les textes de la tradition juive, dans les mythes et les contes populaires
Faire famille : transmission, continuité et ruptures
Chapitre II. L’enquête : Entre la France et Israël
L’adoption, un éléphant dans le salon ?
Les terrains de la recherche
Les acteurs et les procédures de l’adoption en France et à l’international
L’adoption en Israël – Les enjeux politico-religieux
La situation israélienne
Chapitre III. Les étapes d’un « parcours du combattant »
Du désir de procréation à la décision d’adopter
Obtenir l’agrément
Adopter en France : ethnicité, reconnaissance et « look différentiel »
L’adoption internationale
Chapitre IV – La rencontre
L’accélération du temps – l’accélération du récit
L’enfant imaginé, l’enfant photographié, l’enfant rencontré, l’enfant adopté
L’origine de l’enfant, ce que l’on sait de lui, ce que l’on ne veut pas savoir, ce que l’on raconte
La rencontre : un destin ?
Le temps du retour
Devenir parents
Chapitre V. Nommer, inscrire, convertir
Nommer c’est inscrire
La judéité des enfants adoptés : une identité de fait
Convertir
Chapitre VI - Entre hérédité et identification – Le récit des « origines »
Des représentations paradoxales de la filiation : liens du sang / liens du cœur
Le poids de l’hérédité
L’arbre généalogique : une mise en image de la famille dans le temps
La construction des identités individuelles et familiales
Trois récits singuliers : la parole des adoptés et la recherche des origines
Camille : une mère qui se met à la place de ses mères
Sabrina : un entre-deux identitaire
Anna : la construction d’une nouvelle identité familiale
Une mise en perspective
Conclusion – Transmettre
Bibliographie
Author(s): Sheldon, Ruth
Date: 2016
Date: 2018
Date: 2007
Author(s): Brown, Melanie
Date: 2012
Abstract: The Jewish community of Dublin has been in existence for 400 years. Nowadays, many Dublin Jews are descended from Lithuanians who settled in Dublin at the turn of the twentieth century. Most Dublin Jews are integrated into Dublin society, yet little is known of cultural practices specific to Dublin’s Jewish community. This dissertation focuses on the practice of liturgical music in Terenure synagogue, one of Dublin’s two remaining Orthodox synagogues. While music is an integral part of all synagogue services throughout the year, the musical repertoire of the Sabbath morning service has been selected as representing the music which is most commonly experienced by practicing Orthodox Jews in Dublin. Much of the music in Dublin’s Orthodox synagogue has been retained as part of a Lithuanian oral tradition. However, the Dublin Jewish community is currently undergoing a demographic shift, owing to the emigration of Dublin-born Jews coupled with migration into Dublin of Jews from a variety of social, cultural and national backgrounds. As the profile of the Jewish community changes, there is evidence of a gradual shift in the musical tradition of the synagogue. Here there is an attempt to preserve part of the Lithuanian musical tradition for the future. Ethnographic fieldwork has been conducted among all sections of the Jewish community of Dublin in order to obtain information regarding the history, culture and identity of Dublin Jews. This has provided insight into the oral tradition which has retained the music of the Orthodox synagogue thus far. Other sources of information have included archives and further published/unpublished resources. The research has also involved recording, transcribing and analysing examples of liturgical Jewish music performed in Dublin. This has resulted in a comprehensive historical account of the Dublin Jewish community together with a discussion on Irish Jewish identity. Such material provides a background for the corpus of music which has been collected from various contributors. As well as recordings, this features six fully transcribed versions of the main sections from the Orthodox Sabbath service performed by five individuals, and a discussion on performance practice within the synagogue. It also includes examples of congregational singing which also forms a significant part of the service. Considerations are given to issues including emotion, identity, transmission, gender and the role of the congregation in the performance of music within the Orthodox synagogue of Dublin. The findings reveal that musical performance in the synagogue assists in promoting a sense of community among those who participate. Orthodox Jewish liturgical music and the way it is disseminated whether in the synagogue or other setting also provides a link with the past, dialogue with the past being an integral part of broad Jewish culture. Prior to this, little has been documented regarding the music of the Orthodox Dublin synagogue; therefore this research provides a basis on which further study of the topic may be conducted.
Author(s): Özyürek, Esra
Date: 2016
Author(s): Dekel, Irit
Date: 2016