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Date: 2017
Abstract: How often do incidents of antisemitic violence occur in contemporary Europe, and what trends are
showing? How exposed are Jewish populations in different countries? Who commits these crimes? We
need to answer such questions as precisely as possible in order to effectively combat and prevent
antisemitism in general and violent antisemitism in particular, but we lack the knowledge to do so because
systematic studies of the subject are few and far between. As a step towards filling this research gap, the
current report presents some tentative findings about violent antisemitism in a sample of European
countries and proposes directions for further research.

Combining incident data based on police reporting with a 2012 survey on antisemitism carried out by
the European Union’s Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA), this report tentatively compares the levels of
antisemitic violence in different countries. The seven-country sample contains comparable data for France,
UK, Germany and Sweden only. Among these countries, Jews’ exposure to antisemitic violence appears to
have been highest in France, lower in Sweden and Germany, and lowest in the United Kingdom.
Figures for Norway, Denmark and Russia are not directly comparable because of differing data
sources. However, Russia clearly stands out with a very low number of incidents considering Russia’s
relatively large Jewish population. Russia is also the only case in which there is little to indicate that Jews
avoid displaying their identity in public.

Available data on perpetrators suggest that individuals of Muslim background stand out among
perpetrators of antisemitic violence in Western Europe, but not in Russia, where right-wing extremist
offenders dominate. Attitude surveys corroborate this picture in so far as antisemitic attitudes are far more
widespread among Muslims than among the general population in Western Europe.
The findings presented here are tentative. More and better data as well as more research are needed in
order to form a more accurate picture of the nature and causes of antisemitic violence, a prerequisite for
determining relevant countermeasures.
Date: 2017
Abstract: Hvor ofte forekommer antisemittiske voldshendelser i dagens Europa, og hvilken vei går utviklingen?
Hvor utsatt er de jødiske befolkningene i ulike land? Og hvem står bak ugjerningene? Effektiv forebygging
og bekjempelse er avhengig av at slike spørsmål besvares så presist som mulig, men vi mangler den
nødvendige kunnskapen ettersom svært lite forskning er gjort på feltet. Denne rapporten presenterer noen
tentative funn om voldelig antisemittisme i et utvalg europeiske land og foreslår retninger for videre
forskning.

Ved å bruke hendelsestall basert på anmeldelser i kombinasjon med EUs Fundamental Rights Agency
(FRA) sin spørreundersøkelse om antisemittisme fra 2012, er det mulig å foreta en begrenset og tentativ
sammenlikning av det antisemittiske voldsnivået på tvers av land. I denne rapportens utvalg foreligger
sammenliknbare data kun for Frankrike, Storbritannia, Tyskland og Sverige. Jøders utsatthet for
antisemittisk vold synes å være høyest i Frankrike, mindre i Sverige og Tyskland, og lavest i Storbritannia.
Tall for Norge, Danmark og Russland er ikke sammenliknbare på grunn av mangelfulle data. Vi har
telt 10 hendelser i Norge, 20 i Danmark og 33 i Russland for perioden 2005-2015. Nivået i Russland er
tilsynelatende svært lavt i forhold til vesteuropeiske land og gitt Russlands relativt store jødiske minoritet.
Russland er også det eneste landet der vi ikke har funnet indikasjoner på at jøder unngår å vise sin identitet
offentlig.

Tilgjengelige data tyder på at personer med bakgrunn fra muslimske land skiller seg ut blant dem som
begår antisemittiske voldshandlinger i Vest-Europa, men ikke i Russland, der høyreekstreme aktører
dominerer. Holdningsundersøkelser bygger opp under dette bildet for så vidt som antisemittiske
holdninger er betydelig mer utbredt blant muslimer enn befolkningen generelt i vesteuropeiske land.
Denne rapportens funn er tentative og ment som et oppspill til videre forskning. Bedre data og flere
systematiske studier er nødvendig for å danne et mer presist bilde av fenomenet og dets årsaker, hvilket
igjen er en forutsetning for å kunne bestemme relevante mottiltak.
Date: 2016
Author(s): Kosmin, Barry A.
Date: 2016
Abstract: Launched by the American Jewish Joint Distribution
Committee’s International Centre for Community
Development (JDC-ICCD), and conducted by a research
team at Trinity College (Hartford, Connecticut, USA)
between June and August 2015, the Third Survey of
European Jewish Leaders and Opinion Formers presents
the results of an online survey administered to 314
respondents in 29 countries. The survey was conducted
online in five languages: English, French, Spanish, German
and Hungarian. The Survey of European Jewish Leaders
and Opinion Formers is conducted every three or four
years using the same format, in order to identify trends
and their evolution. Findings of the 2015 edition were
assessed and evaluated based on the results of previous
surveys (2008 and 2011).
The survey posed Jewish leaders and opinion formers a
range of questions about major challenges and issues that
concern European Jewish communities in 2015, and about
their expectations of how communities will evolve over
the next 5-10 years. The 45 questions (see Appendix) dealt
with topics that relate to internal community structures
and their functions, as well as the external environment
affecting communities. The questionnaire also included
six open-ended questions in a choice of five languages.
These answers form the basis of the qualitative analysis
of the report. The questions were organized under the
following headings:
• Vision & Change (6 questions)
• Decision-Making & Control (1 question)
• Lay Leadership (1 question)
• Professional Leadership (2 questions)
• Status Issues & Intermarriage (5 questions)
• Organizational Frameworks (2 questions)
• Community Causes (2 questions)
• Jewish Education (1 question)
• Funding (3 questions)
• Communal Tensions (3 questions)
• Anti-Semitism/Security (5 questions)
• Europe (1 question)
• Israel (1 question)
• Future (2 questions)
• Personal Profile (9 questions)
Author(s): Pinto, Diana
Date: 2009
Abstract: The Res Publica (Latin for “public good”) project, funded by the Ford Foundation, was designed to bring together a diverse groups of thinkers, activists and commentators in Europe to consider some of Europe’s most pressing issues: notably, the loss of a sense of the common good in our pluralist democracies, a consequent erosion of feelings of shared belonging and the emergence of new types of tribalism.

The project involved independent voices from different religious, cultural, ethnic and secular backgrounds - each speaking in his or her personal capacity - in a series of small, closed and off the record national round tables – and each lasting for two and a half days in a rural residential setting. The national round tables were intended to open the way for a more pan-European shared reflection on the res publica.

Each round table explored the conflicts, underlying fears and defensive reflexes that exist in each country and within each minority or majority group; in other words, those factors which have led to a weakened common public space. The project intentionally sought to broach difficult questions in a context of mutual trust - questions linked to national identity, the role of the law, citizenship, the role and rights of (often silent) majorities and (often vocal) minorities, secular responses to collective religious demands, and the link between civil society and the state. The round tables were also intended to address the tensions between national cohesion and a ‘Europe without borders’, especially their impact in two areas: integration and the struggle against racism, Islamophobia and antisemitism. To facilitate the discussions, round table participants received a carefully planned set of questions and issues that they were free to address, challenge, or revise in the round table discussions.

The project comprised six national round tables in total (in the UK, Poland, Sweden, France, Germany and the Netherlands), followed by a seventh pan-European one. In keeping with the ‘off the record’ policy of the round tables, the reports of the meetings do not identify those who spoke, and specific attributes (such as a ‘Muslim voice’, a ‘Catholic view’ or a ‘Jewish position’, a ‘judge’, or a ‘civil society activist’) were only mentioned when the person specifically chose to speak in that capacity. Prior to the pan-European one, we commissioned a set of five papers from each country which addressed the five key themes which emerged from the round tables: national identity, the status of minorities, the law, religion, and the state and civil society.
Date: 2011
Abstract: Europe is in the midst of a rapid political and economic unification. What does this mean for the Jewish minority – numbering less than 2 million people and still suffering from the aftermath of the Shoah? Will the Jewish communities participate in Europe’s bold venture without risking total assimilation? Are they vibrant enough to form a new Jewish center alongside Israel and the American Jewish community, or are they hopelessly divided and on a “Road to Nowhere”?

Different perspectives are predicted, relating to demographical, cultural and sociological aspects. This volume provides exciting, thorough and controversial answers by renowned scholars from Europe, Israel, North- and Latin America – many of them also committed to local Jewish community building.

Table of contents
Contents
Part I: The Jewish World Context
Jews in Europe: Demographic Trends, Contexts and Outlooks Sergio DellaPergola
The European Jewish Diaspora: The Third Pillar of World Jewry? Gabriel Sheffer
Cultural Pluralism as an American Zionist Option for Solidarity and its Relevance for Today's European Jewry Ofer Schiff
Part II: European Jewish Experiences
Between Eurasia and Europe: Jewish Community and Identities in Contemporary Russia and Ukraine Vladimir Ze'ev Khanin
A Dual, Divided Modernization. Reflections on 200 Years of the Jewish Reform Movement in Germany Micha Brumlik
Ghosts of the Past, Challenges of the Present: New and Old "Others" in Contemporary Spain Raanan Rein/ Martina Weisz
The Dialectics of the Diaspora. On the Art of Being Jewish in the Swedish Minority Lars Dencik
Does European Jewry need a New Ethnic Spiritual Umbrella? Reflections Yosef Gorny
Farewell to Europe? On French Jewish Skepticism about the New Universalism Pierre Birnbaum
The Return of the European Jewish Diaspora. New Ethno-National Constellations since 1989 Michal Y. Bodeman
Reading Between the Lines. Assertion and Reassertion in European Jewish Life Antony Lerman
Part III: Anti Semitism, Israel and Jewish Politics
Hate Against the Others. About the Fatal Chain Creating Xenophobia and Anti-Semitism Thomas Gergely
"Anti-Semites of the Continent Unite!" Is the East Still Different? Raphael Vago
Anti-Semitism or Judeophobia? The intellectual Debate in France 2000-2005 Denis Charbit
From Anti-Jewish Prejudice to Political Anti-Semitism? On Dynamics of Anti-Semitism in Post-Communist Hungary
A Mediterranean Bridge over Troubled Water. Cultural Ideas on How to Reconcile Israel with Its Neighbors and with Europe David Ohana
The Future of European Jewry - A Changing Condition in a Changing Context? Shmuel Trigano
Date: 2009
Abstract: The European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights presents its 5th brief
update of its 2004 report “Manifestations of anti-Semitism in the EU”. The
overview contains the latest governmental and non-governmental
statistical data covering 2001 to 2008 for those EU Member States that
have official or unofficial data and statistics on anti-Semitic incidents. The
Agency collects regularly publicly available official and unofficial data and
information on racism and xenophobia in the EU Member States through
its Racism and Xenophobia Network (RAXEN) with a special focus on
anti-Semitism.

The Agency’s data collection work shows that most Member States do not
have official or even unofficial data and statistics on anti-Semitic incidents.
Even where data exist they are not comparable, since they are collected
following different methodologies. For some countries, RAXEN National
Focal Points provide the Agency with lists of cases collected either ad hoc
by civil society organisations or through the media with varying degrees of
validity and reliability. Detailed data and incidents lists are presented in the
FRA electronic database, Info_Portal at http://infoportal.fra.europa.eu.
The Agency’s regular review of data collection systems indicates that most
Member States have a serious problem of underreporting, particularly in
reference to official systems of data collection that are based on police
records and on crime and law statistics, because not all anti-Semitic
incidents registered officially are categorised under the label “antiSemitism”
and/or because not all anti-Semitic incidents are reported to the
official body by the victims or witnesses of an incident.

A complementary problem to underreporting is misreporting and overreporting:
This could be the case in unofficial data collection carried out by
organisations that do not provide information concerning their
methodologies.
Author(s): Sion, Brigitte
Date: 2016
Abstract: The goals of the Foundation in conducting this survey were manifold:
we aimed to generate a comprehensive picture of the Jewish museum
landscape across Europe, and to identify the most pressing issues,
challenges and needs faced by these institutions. We wanted to learn about
the mission, philosophy and methodology of Jewish museums, and better
understand their role and position in the cultural and educational realm at
large. We were also interested in the level of professionalization of Jewish
museums, both in staff training, collection preservation and cataloguing,
management, and the ways in which Jewish museums communicate and
arrange partnerships with one another. With a better understanding of
these issues, we want now to assess the resources needed and the funding
priorities for the next five to ten years.

The questionnaire was sent to 120 institutions in 34 countries and we
received 64 completed forms from 30 countries. The questions addressed
eleven broad topics: organisation, collections, permanent and temporary
exhibitions, facility, visitor services, public programmes, visitor
demographics, marketing and PR, finances, future plans and needs.

This diverse sample enabled us to get, for the first time, a quasicomprehensive
picture of the Jewish museum landscape in Europe, from
small community museums to landmarks of “starchitecture;” from
institutions boasting thousands of rare objects to others mostly text
panels- or technology-based; from museums employing scores of
professional staff and interns to synagogues-turned-exhibition halls run by
volunteers for a few hours a month. That was precisely the challenge: the
large and numerous discrepancies between institutions, depending on their
location, their financial and human resources, their political and economic
context, the type of visitors they receive, and other contextual
considerations.

The results point to four major findings:
1. Transition from museums to multi-purpose hubs;
2. Lack of collaboration and partnerships;
3. Tension between particularistic and universalistic missions;
4. Increasing need to serve a diverse audience.
Date: 2000
Abstract: På uppdrag av Judiska Centralrädet i Sverige och i samarbete med Institute for Jewish Policy Research i London och dåvarande ordföranden för Judiska Församlingen i Göteborg prof. Skgvard Rubenowiiz har vi tillrättalagt en undersökning av hur judar i Svertge idag ser på sig själva och sin framtid. I del syftet utarbetade vi frågeformuläret Frägor om judiskt liv. Frågeformuläret omfattar knappt hundra frågor varav flera med många delfrågor om hur man upplever sig själv som jude, om vilka levnadssvanor och elfarenheter man liar, och 0m ens inställning både till specifikt judiska förhållanden och till mcr allmänna livs- och samhällsfrågor.

Frågeformuläret har utsänts till medlemmarna i Judiska församlingarna i Götcborg och Stockholm. Göteborgs- och Stockholmsversionerna skiljer sig åt vad gällcr deras grafiska utformning, men är i innehållsligt avseende identiska, bortsett från att Göteborgsversionen rymmer 13 frågar som specifikt berör lokala förhållanden i Göteborg, medan Stockholmsversionen innehåller 14 frågor som sårskilt berör stockholmsförhåflanden. Församlingarna i de två städerna har per post sänt ut ett exemplar av frågeförmularet Frågor om judisk liv samt ett frankerat svarskuvert til varje enskild medlem som är 18 år eller äldre och som betalt sin skatt till Judiska Församlingen i Göteborg resp. Stockholm. I den medföljande instruktionen garanterades medlemmarna full anonymitet. Datainsamlingen i Göteborg ägde rum under sommarmånaderna 1999, medlemmarna i Stockholm fick möjlighet att besvara frågeformuläret i september/oktober samma år.
Med denna rapport redovisar vi de svar vi fått på dc frågcr vi ställt.
Editor(s): Müssener, Helmut
Date: 2011
Abstract:
Publikationer
Forskningspubliceringar
Skriftserier
Current Issues
Digitala skrifter från Hugo Valentin-centrum
Studia multiethnica Upsaliensia
The Hugo Valentin Lectures
Uppsala Multiethnic Papers
Judarna i Sverige – en minoritets historia
Rasen och vetenskapen
Revitalisera mera!
Språket, makten och härligheten
Standard Language Differentiation in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Grammars, Language Textbooks, Readers
Remindings
UUHGS Publications
Endangered Languages and Cultures (ELC)
NAMIS-serien
Nya publikationer
Tidskriften multiethnica
Judarna i Sverige – en minoritets historia
Fyra föreläsningar




Ur inledningen:

Judarna i Sverige – en minoritets historia var rubriken på en föreläsningsserie som arrangerades höstterminen 2009 vid Uppsala universitet. Ansvarig för serien var det nuvarande Hugo-Valentin-centrum, en sammanslagning av det tidigare självständiga Programmet för studier kring Förintelsen och folkmord med Centrum för multietnisk forskning. Serien genomfördes i samarbete med Forum för Advanced Studies in Arts, Languages and Theology. Föreläsningarna var öppna för allmänheten och inträdet fritt. Ordförande för serien var professor emeritus Helmut Müssener.

Vid sidan av Hugo Valentins monografi Judarnas historia i Sverige från 1924 har det länge varit tunnsått med akademiska studier kring gruppens historia. På senare år har dock en rad vetenskapliga arbeten publicerats och forskningsprojekt påbörjats. 2008 bildades även ett tvärvetenskapligt nationellt nätverk med samma namn som föreläsningsserien: Judarna i Sverige – en minoritets historia.

I sammanlagt fem föreläsningar belyste serien olika aspekter av de svenska judarnas historia under drygt 200 år fram till våra dagar och deras strategier för anpassning och integration samt deras ansträngningar för att bevara den egna kulturen. Föreläsningarna baserades till stor del på ny forskning, och föreläsarna – medlemmar i nätverket – är knutna till olika universitet och högskolor i landet och är specialister på sitt område. Fyra av dessa föreläsningar publiceras nu i denna volym. Den femte föreläsningen med rubriken Ett försök till en svensk-judisk historiografi, som hölls av Lars M Andersson, universitetslektor vid Uppsala universitet, har tyvärr fått utgå på grund av föreläsarens alltför stora arbetsbörda. I denna föreläsning redogjorde Andersson mycket ingående och detaljerat för den tämligen omfattande svensk-judiska historiografin.

Den svensk-judiska befolkningsgruppens historia kan räknas tillbaka till 1770-talet, då de första judarna fick lov att permanent bosätta sig i Sverige utan att behöva överge sin religion. Gruppen utgör av många skäl ett idealiskt objekt för studier om exempelvis minoriteter, integration och diskriminering.

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