Search results

Your search found 101 items
copy result link
You ran an advanced options search Previous | Next
Sort: Relevance | Topics | Title | Author | Publication Year View all 1 2 3
Home  /  Search Results
Date: 2007
Abstract: The robbery and restitution of Jewish property are two inextricably linked social processes. It is not possible to understand the lawsuits and international agreements on the restoration of Jewish property of the late 1990s without examining what was robbed and by whom. In this volume distinguished historians first outline the mechanisms and scope of the European-wide program of plunder and then assess the effectiveness and historical implications of post-war restitution efforts. Everywhere the solution of legal and material problems was intertwined with changing national myths about the war and conflicting interpretations of justice. Even those countries that pursued extensive restitution programs using rigorous legal means were unable to compensate or fully comprehend the scale of Jewish loss. Especially in Eastern Europe, it was not until the collapse of communism that the concept of restoring some Jewish property rights even became a viable option. Integrating the abundance of new research on the material effects of the Holocaust and its aftermath, this comparative perspective examines the developments in Germany, Poland, Italy, France, Belgium, Hungary and the Czech Republic.

CONTENTS
List of Abbreviations
Preface

Part I: Introduction

Introduction: A History without Boundaries: The Robbery and Restitution of Jewish Property in Europe
Constantin Goschler and Philipp Ther

Part II: The Robbery of Jewish Property in Comparative Perspective

Chapter 1. The Seizure of Jewish Property in Europe: Comparative Aspects of Nazi Methods and Local Responses
Martin Dean

Chapter 2. Aryanization and Restitution in Germany
Frank Bajohr

Chapter 3. The Looting of Jewish Property in Occupied Western Europe: A Comparative Study of Belgium, France, and the Netherlands
Jean-Marc Dreyfus

Chapter 4. The Robbery of Jewish Property in Eastern Europe under German Occupation, 1939–1942
Dieter Pohl

Chapter 5. The Robbery of Jewish Property in Eastern European States Allied with Nazi Germany
Tatjana Tönsmeyer

Part III: The Restitution of Jewish Property in Comparative Perspective

Chapter 6. West Germany and the Restitution of Jewish Property in Europe
Jürgen Lillteicher

Chapter 7. Jewish Property and the Politics of Restitution in Germany after 1945
Constantin Goschler

Chapter 8. Two Approaches to Compensation in France: Restitution and Reparation
Claire Andrieu

Chapter 9. The Expropriation of Jewish Property and Restitution in Belgium
Rudi van Doorslaer

Chapter 10. Indifference and Forgetting: Italy and its Jewish Community, 1938–1970
Ilaria Pavan

Chapter 11. “Why Switzerland?” – Remarks on a Neutral’s Role in the Nazi Program of Robbery and Allied Postwar Restitution Policy
Regula Ludi

Chapter 12. The Hungarian Gold Train: Fantasies of Wealth and the Madness of Genocide
Ronald W. Zweig

Chapter 13. Reluctant Restitution: The Restitution of Jewish Property in the Bohemian Lands after the Second World War
Eduard Kubu and Jan Kuklík Jr.

Chapter 14. The Polish Debate on the Holocaust and the Restitution of Property
Dariusz Stola

Part IV: Concluding Remarks

Conclusion: Reflections on the Restitution and Compensation of Holocaust Theft: Past, Present, and Future
Gerald D. Feldman

Notes on Contributors
Select Bibliography
Index
Date: 2013
Abstract: The ways in which memories of the Holocaust have been communicated, represented and used have changed dramatically over the years. From such memories being neglected and silenced in most of Europe until the 1970s, each country has subsequently gone through a process of cultural, political and pedagogical awareness-rising. This culminated in the ’Stockholm conference on Holocaust commemoration’ in 2000, which resulted in the constitution of a task force dedicated to transmitting and teaching knowledge and awareness about the Holocaust on a global scale. The silence surrounding private memories of the Holocaust has also been challenged in many families. What are the catalysts that trigger a change from silence to discussion of the Holocaust? What happens when we talk its invisibility away? How are memories of the Holocaust reflected in different social environments? Who asks questions about memories of the Holocaust, and which answers do they find, at which point in time and from which past and present positions related to their societies and to the phenomenon in question? This book highlights the contexts in which such questions are asked. By introducing the concept of ’active memory’, this book contributes to recent developments in memory studies, where memory is increasingly viewed not in isolation but as a dynamic and relational part of human lives.

Contents: Introduction: the Holocaust as active memory; Linking religion and family memories of children hidden in Belgian convents during the Holocaust, Suzanne Vromen; Collective trajectory and generational work in families of Jewish displaced persons: epistemological processes in the research situation, Lena Inowlocki; In a double voice: representations of the Holocaust in Polish literature, 1980-2011, Dorota Glowacka; Winners once a year? How Russian-speaking Jews in Germany make sense of WWII and the Holocaust as part of transnational biographic experience, Julia Bernstein; Women’s peace activism and the Holocaust: reversing the hegemonic Holocaust discourse in Israel, Tova Benski and Ruth Katz; ’The history, the papers, let me see it!’ Compensation processes: the second generation between archive truth and family speculations, Nicole L. Immler; From rescue to escape in 1943: on a path to de-victimizing the Danish Jews. Sofie Lene Bak; Finland, the Vernichtungskrieg and the Holocaust, Oula Silvennoinen; Swedish rescue operations during the Second World War: accomplishments and aftermath, Ulf Zander; The social phenomenon of silence, Irene Levin; Index.
Date: 2018
Abstract: There is a persistent claim that new migrants to Europe, and specifically migrants from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA migrants), carry antisemitism with them. This assertion is made to different degrees in different countries and can take different forms. Nevertheless, in Europe, the association of rising antisemitism with migrants from the Middle East and North Africa
is widespread and needs to be evaluated.

MENA migrants have been symbolically central to the migration debate since 2011. These years have been framed by the Arab spring and its aftermath and by Europe’s crisis of refugee protection. This research project has focused specifically on MENA migrants, in response to the intensity of this debate, and in accordance with the brief from Foundation EVZ. The central concern of the research project has been to investigate whether the arrival of MENA migrants since 2011 has had an impact on antisemitic attitudes and behaviour in Western Europe. This report deals with the case of Belgium. The report also considers whether government and civil society agencies have identified a problem of antisemitism among MENA migrants. The findings are based on an extensive survey of existing quantitative and qualitative evidence. Additionally, new qualitative research has been undertaken to investigate the experiences and opinions of a range of actors.

This national report contributes to a larger research project conducted in 2016/2017 across five European countries – Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. A final report, Antisemitism and Immigration in Western Europe Today: is there a connection? Findings and recommendations from a five-nation study, draws out common trends, makes comparisons and provides recommendations for civil society organizations and for governments.
Author(s): Feldman, David
Date: 2018
Author(s): Feldman, David
Date: 2018
Author(s): Feldman, David
Date: 2018
Author(s): Graham, David
Date: 2018
Abstract: JPR’s report, European Jewish identity: Mosaic or monolith? An empirical assessment of eight European countries, authored by Senior Research Fellow Dr David Graham, asks whether there is such a thing as a European Jewish identity, and, if so, what it looks like.

The question of whether there is a Jewish identity that is at once common to all European Jews but also peculiar to them, has intrigued scholars of contemporary Jewry since the fall of the Berlin Wall. This study contrasts the European picture with the two major centres of world Jewry, the United States and Israel, and examines the nature and content of Jewish identity across Europe, exploring the three core pillars of belief, belonging and behaviour around which Jewish identity is built.

This research was made possible by the advent of the EU Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA) survey in 2012 examining Jewish people’s experiences and perceptions of antisemitism across nine EU Member States: Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Romania, Sweden and the UK. As well as gathering data about antisemitism, the study investigated various aspects of the Jewishness of respondents, in order to ascertain whether different types of Jews perceive and experience antisemitism differently. This study focuses on the data gathered about Jewishness, thereby enabling direct comparisons to be made for the first time across multiple European Jewish communities in a robust and comprehensive way.

The report concludes that there is no monolithic European identity, but it explores in detail the mosaic of Jewish identity in Europe, highlighting some key differences:
• In Belgium, where Jewish parents are most likely to send their children to Jewish schools, there is a unique polarisation between the observant and non-observant;
• In France, Jews exhibit the strongest feelings of being part of the Jewish People, and also have the strongest level of emotional attachment to Israel;
• Germany’s Jewish community has the largest proportion of foreign-born Jews, and, along with Hungary, is the youngest Jewish population;
• In Hungary the greatest relative weight in Jewish identity priorities is placed on 'Combating antisemitism,' and the weakest level of support for Israel is exhibited;
• In Italy, respondents are least likely to report being Jewish by birth or to have two Jewish parents;
• The Jews of Latvia are the oldest population and the most likely to be intermarried;
• The Jews of Sweden attach a very high level of importance to 'Combating antisemitism' despite being relatively unlikely to experience it, and they observe few Jewish practices;
• In the United Kingdom, Jews observe the most religious practices and appear to feel the least threatened by antisemitism. They are the most likely to be Jewish by birth and least likely to be intermarried.

According to report author, Dr David Graham: “This report represents far more than the culmination of an empirical assessment of Jewish identity. Never before has it been possible to examine Jewish identity across Europe in anything approaching a coherent and systematic way. Prior to the FRA’s survey, it was almost inconceivable that an analysis of this kind could be carried out at all. The formidable obstacles of cost, language, political and logistical complexity seemed to present impenetrable barriers to the realisation of any such dream. Yet this is exactly what has been achieved, a report made possible through an FRA initiative into furthering understanding of Jewish peoples' experience of antisemitism. It reveals a European Jewry that is more mosaic than monolith, an array of Jewish communities, each exhibiting unique Jewish personas, yet united by geography and a common cultural heritage."
Author(s): Longman, Chia
Date: 2010
Abstract: In deze bijdrage wordt een synthese gebracht van de resultaten van twee socioculturele
antropologische onderzoeksprojecten in de Antwerpse joodsorthodoxe
gemeenschap die betrekking hebben op de ‘eigenheid’, ‘emancipatie’ en ‘integratie’
van vrouwen. Eerst wordt de betekenis van vrouwelijke religiositeit vanuit het
standpunt van strikt Orthodoxe, waaronder chassidische, vrouwen belicht. Terwijl in
het publieke en institutionele religieus domein mannen de paradigmatische ‘orthodoxe
jood’ zijn, is door de sacralisatie van het dagelijkse leven, de religieuze rol voor
vrouwen niet minder omvattend of belangrijk, maar vooral gesitueerd in de private en
huiselijke sfeer. Ik beargumenteer dat deze vorm van religieuze en gegenderde
eigenheid vanuit een antropologisch en gender-kritisch perspectief niet eenduidig
geïnterpreteerd kan worden in termen van ‘onderdrukking’ dan wel ‘emancipatie’. Het
tweede onderzoeksproject behandelt de problematiek van joodsorthodoxe vrouwen
(gaande van strikt tot modern orthodox) in Antwerpen die religieuze gendernormen
overschrijden door te studeren of werken in de omliggende seculiere maatschappij. De
levensverhalen onthullen zeer verschillende trajecten van vrouwen die de ontmoeting
met de ‘buitenwereld’ dikwijls verrijkend vonden maar ook wel interculturele
conflicten ervoeren. Er wordt besloten dat behoud van culturele eigenheid, naast
emancipatie en integratie van binnen uit de joodsorthodoxe gemeenschap niet
onmogelijk is, maar dat dit minimaal wederzijds dialoog en begrip vereist.

Author(s): Perry-Hazan, Lotem
Date: 2016
Author(s): Ben-Rafael, Eliezer
Date: 2017
Abstract: Contemporary works have shown that antisemitism is far from moribund in Europe and it is in this context that in 2012 was conducted extensive research in the EU on current perceptions and experiences of antisemitism among Jews in Europe. I present and analyze here results that relate specifically to Belgian Jews (438 subjects out of 6,200 in eight countries). The first objective of this work is to learn about the Jewishness of our sample. Hence, we find that 40% of the respondents identify themselves as secular Jews; 15% consider themselves liberals; more than a quarter say they “observe certain traditions”; one sixth define themselves as Orthodox Jews. The data confirm, at this point, that there is only a limited correlation between religiosity and Jewishness: less religious or even non-religious people tend to express an identification with, and commitment to, Jewishness that were not weaker than the Orthodox’. The various factions are also united by a general feeling that while Belgium cannot be considered as an antisemitic state, it is currently experiencing virulent antisemitism in wide milieus. This antisemitism is bound to a sharp anti-Israelism salient in public life, the media, and the Internet. More than a number of other communities in Europe, Belgian Jews see antisemitism reigning in their environment with a gravity. They testify that the Israel-Palestine conflict weighs on their sense of insecurity; they confess that they have often considered the option of emigrating and they openly accuse Muslim extremists of inciting antisemitism. Belgian Jews also feel more vulnerable to antisemitic attacks and tend to resent a weakening in their position in society. On the other hand, what grants support to the Belgian Jews in these circumstances is that they often belong to the properous segments of the population. Moreover, there is the vitality of the community where one finds multiple forms of expression and activity - magazines, radio, clubs, synagogues, museums, etc.- and above all, exceptional educational infrastructures. These resources allow Belgian Jews, if not to protect themselves against the virus of antisemitism, at least to face it.
Date: 2004
Abstract: Ce rapport contient:

une comparaison des actes antisémites pour les années 2000 à 2003;
le total des actes antisémites pour l’année 2003;
le total des incidents par type d’incident;
le total des incidents par type de cible;
le total des incidents par ville.


Analyse des incidents recensés en Belgique depuis le 1erjanvier 2003

28 actes à caractère antisémite ont été recensés en Belgique depuis le 1er janvier 2003.

Le nombre d’incidents à fortement diminué par rapport à celui de l’année dernière, puisqu’à la même époque, 62 d’incidents avaient été perpétrés à l’encontre de la communauté juive de Belgique, soit plus du double.

Nous avions établi la relation entre les incidents survenant en Belgique à la suite de l’actualité au Proche Orient.

La population belge étant lassée d’entendre parler de ce problème, elle s’est intéressée à d’autres thématiques telles que la guerre en Irak et les problèmes socio-économiques nationaux, ce qui peut expliquer la chute du nombre d’incidents au cours de cette année 2003.

Au sujet des actes à caractère antisémite que nous avons recensé depuis 11 mois, ceux-ci sont principalement composés d’agressions, d’insultes et de menaces faites à l’encontre des membres de la Communauté juive. Les bâtiments communautaires représentent ensuite la deuxième cible. Viennent alors la dégradation de biens appartenant à des membres de la communauté juive, un attentat à la bombe, la découverte d’un colis suspect, des graffitis, la profanation de tombes juives, la découverte de cocktails molotovs, des tentatives de pénétrations dans des bâtiments communautaires, ainsi que de nombreuses prises de renseignement.

Date: 2005
Abstract: Ce rapport contient:

une comparaison des actes antisémites pour les années 2000 à 2004;
le total des actes antisémites pour l’année 2004;
le total des incidents par type d’incident;
le total des incidents par type de cible;
le total des incidents par ville.


Analyse des incidents antisémites recensés au cours de l’année 2004

Du 1er janvier au 31 décembre 2004, 46 incidents antisémites ont été recensés en Belgique.

Les villes les plus touchées sont Anvers et Bruxelles, suivent Knokke, Gand, Charleroi et Hasselt.

Deux constats clairs peuvent être mis en avant pour cette année 2004:

Le premier est l’augmentation importante d’incidents à Anvers. Alors qu’en 2002, sur les 62 incidents recensés, 7 seulement ont été perpétrés à Anvers et que, pour l’année 2003, on n’en a compté que 3 sur 28, en 2004, 20 incidents antisémites ont été recensés sur le territoire de la province d’Anvers.
Quant au second constat, il pointe la différence claire de nature des incidents antisémites entre la ville d’Anvers et les autres villes du pays. Alors que les actes antisémites perpétrés sont principalement des insultes, menaces ou actes de vandalisme dans les autres villes, 7 des 9 agressions antisémites recensées en Belgique ont été commises à Anvers, dont le plus grave fut le coup de couteau dans le dos reçu par un jeune étudiant d’une yeshiva.
Ces constats ne relèvent aucunement du hasard et plusieurs raisons peuvent être avancées pour le confirmer. Tout d’abord, la grande majorité des victimes d’actes antisémites à Anvers sont les juifs orthodoxes. Ceux-ci sont victimes de bien plus d’actes antisémites que ceux recensés. Seulement, ces victimes ne réagissent que très peu. Ce n’est que grâce à un travail de sensibilisation des organisations juives anversoises que les victimes issues de cette communauté isolée prennent maintenant de plus en plus l’initiative de déposer plainte. En outre, les victimes d’agressions sont reconnaissables en tant que juives de part leur habillement (chapeau noir, kaftan noir, papillotes…) et constituent par conséquent une cible beaucoup plus facilement repérable pour les auteurs d’agression. Enfin, l’AEL (Arab European League) est bien implantée dans les milieux arabes anversois. Ses nombreux communiqués sur l’actualité au Proche-Orient, visant à combattre l’ennemi sioniste et à stigmatiser la ville d’Anvers comme la capitale du sionisme européen, devant, à leurs yeux, devenir la Mecque du combat pour la liberté du peuple palestinien, importent le conflit et amènent des jeunes souvent désoeuvrés à commettre de tels actes.

Enfin, les cibles restent à près de 75% des personnes physiques. Les bâtiments communautaires (centres, synagogues, musées) ont subis 5 actes de vandalisme ou menaces, tandis que les lieux publics ont fait l’objet de 4 actes de vandalisme (croix gammées, etc…).
Translated Title: 2005 Report
Date: 2006
Abstract: Ce rapport contient:

une analyse générale;
une comparaison des actes antisémites pour les années 2000 à 2006;
le total des actes antisémites pour l’année 2006;
le total des incidents par type d’incident;
le total des incidents par type de cible;
ainsi que le total des incidents par ville.

Analyse des incidents antisémites recensés au cours de l’année 2005

Du 1er janvier au 31 décembre 2005, 60 incidents antisémites ont été recensés en Belgique. Les villes les plus touchées sont Bruxelles et Anvers, suivent la région du Brabant wallon (banlieue sud de Bruxelles), Knokke, Namur et Eupen. Certains actes touchent plus largement toute la Belgique de par la spécificité du support (presse écrite, internet…).

Deux constats clairs peuvent être mis en avant pour cette année 2005 et confirment clairement les tendances rencontrées en 2004.

Le premier est le maintient d’un nombre important d’incidents à Anvers. Alors qu’en 2002, sur les 62 incidents recensés, 7 seulement ont été perpétrés à Anvers et que, pour l’année 2003, on n’en a compté que 3 sur 28, en 2004, 20 incidents antisémites ont été recensés sur Anvers et 19 nouveaux ont pu être enregistrés pour l’année 2005.

Quant au second constat, il pointe la différence claire de la nature des incidents antisémites entre Anvers et les autres villes du pays. Sur la base des incidents recensés, 75% des attaques sur les personnes ont été perpétrées à l’encontre de membres de la Communauté juive anversoise. A Bruxelles, on relève par contre une grande augmentation des actes de vandalisme (croix gammées, celtiques…).

Ces constats ne relèvent aucunement du hasard et plusieurs raisons peuvent être avancées pour le confirmer. Tout d’abord, la grande majorité des victimes d’actes antisémites à Anvers sont les juifs orthodoxes. Ceux-ci sont victimes de bien plus d’actes antisémites que ceux recensés. Seulement, ces victimes ne réagissent que très peu. Ce n’est que grâce à un travail de sensibilisation des organisations juives anversoises que les victimes issues de de la communauté orthodoxe prennent maintenant de plus en plus l’initiative de déposer plainte. Cette tranche de la communauté est plus facilement reconnaissable en tant que juive de par l’habillement de ses membres et constitue par conséquent une cible beaucoup plus facilement repérable pour les auteurs d’agression. Enfin, l’AEL (Arab European League) est très bien implantée dans la Communauté arabo-musulmane anversoise. Ses nombreux communiqués sur l’actualité au Proche-Orient, visant à combattre l’ennemi sioniste et à stigmatiser Anvers comme la capitale du sionisme européen, devant, à leurs yeux, devenir la Mecque du combat pour la liberté du peuple palestinien, importent le conflit et amènent des jeunes habilement manipulés à commettre de tels actes.

Le nombre d’actes antisémites peut paraître élevé puisqu’il égale presque les 62 actes recensés en 2002, année où s’est déroulée en Israël l’« Opération Rempart », opération qui a fait des vagues partout dans le monde et a, entre autres en Belgique et en France, été prétexte à l’importation du conflit et au passage à l’acte antisémite de certains au nom de l’antisionisme. Le nombre élevé d’actes antisémites ne signifie pas pour autant qu’il y a une augmentation de l’antisémitisme en Belgique mais est plutôt le résultat d’une meilleure communication des incidents et d’une meilleure collaboration avec les autorités compétentes.

Enfin, au niveau politique, deux résolutions du Sénat et du Parlement bruxellois ont été adoptées afin de demander aux autorités compétentes de réagir plus fermement contre l’antisémitisme, en poursuivant de façon systématique les auteurs d’actes antisémites, négationnistes et révisionnistes. Il est également demandé aux autorités compétentes de prendre toutes les mesures nécessaires pour assurer la protection nécessaire et indispensable des membres des diverses communautés dans le cadre de leurs pratiques religieuses ou lors de la fréquentation de leurs écoles et de leurs lieux communautaires. En 2004, l’ancienne ministre de l’Egalité des Chances, Marie Arena, avait déjà, suite à plusieurs actes antisémites graves, présenté un plan en 10 points pour lutter contre le racisme et l’antisémitisme. Toutes ces initiatives doivent encore être concrétisées dans les faits…
Date: 2014
Abstract: Antisemitisme.be recense, depuis l’année 2001, les actes antisémites commis sur l’ensemble du territoire belge et, chaque année, publie un rapport sur l’antisémitisme en Belgique.Dans ce document, vous découvrirez la liste de tous les incidents recensés, notre méthodologie de travail, une réflexion sur l’antisionisme ainsi qu’une analyse de l’année écoulée.
S’agissant du rapport 2013, vous n’y retrouverez pas de trace de l’attentat du 24 mai 2014 contre le Musée Juif de Belgique qui a fait 4 morts.

Vous n’y trouverez pas non plus les signalements les plus récents liés à Laurent Louis, Dieudonné et le congrès (interdit) de la dissidence européenne qui devait se tenir le 4 mai 2014 à Bruxelles.

Les incidents recensés et analysés dans ce rapport sont ceux qui nous ont été communiqués ou qui ont fait l’objet d’une plainte pour racisme. Les chiffres repris dans cette analyse reflètent bien sûr une tendance et non une photographie exacte dans l’antisémitisme en Belgique.

Comme la Communauté juive en a fait la tragique expérience ce samedi 24 mai 2014, l’antisémitisme ne se quantifie pas seulement par les chiffres mais aussi par la nature des incidents recensés.

Tant que les membres de la Communauté juive se sentiront, à juste titre, en insécurité, tant que les institutions juives auront besoin d’être protégées, tant qu’ils ne pourront pas circuler comme tout citoyen belge en toute sécurité lorsqu’il arbore un signe apparent de judaïté (kippa, étoile de David…), l’antisémitisme devra être combattu et les autorités politiques devront y mettre tous les moyens.


Sinds 2001, identificeert Antisemitisme.be antisemitische handelingen in het hele Belgische grondgebied, en publiceert jaarlijks een verslag over antisemitisme in België.

In dit document vind u een lijst van alle bekende incidenten, onze werk methodologie, alsook een reflectie op anti-zionisme en een analyse van het afgelopen jaar.

Met betrekking tot het verslag van 2013, hierin zal niets vermeld worden over de aanval van 24 mei 2014 tegen het Joods Museum van België, waarbij 4 doden zijn te betreuren.

Tevens zult u niets vinden van de meest recente rapporten met betrekking tot Laurent Louis en Dieudonné, noch van de (verboden) Europees Congres van Dissidentie welke op 4 mei 2014 zou worden gehouden in Brussel.

Incidenten geïdentificeerd en geanalyseerd in dit verslag zijn ofwel gecommuniceerd of dat het onderwerp van een klacht over racisme zijn geweest. De cijfers in deze analyse, zijn zeker als gevolg van een trend, maar geven niet een nauwkeurig beeld van antisemitisme in België.

Antisemitisme kan niet worden gekwantificeerd in aantallen, maar ook door de ernst van de incidenten, zoals de tragische ervaring die de Joodse gemeenschap zaterdag 24 mei, jl. heeft mee moeten maken.

Zolang de leden van de Joodse gemeenschap zich terecht onveilig voelen, de Joodse instellingen beschermd moeten worden, ze niet in staat zijn om veilig te bewegen net als elke andere Belg wanneer ze enig duidelijk teken van joodse identiteit (Kippa, Ster van David, …) dragen, moet antisemitisme bestreden worden en de politieke autoriteiten moeten alle middelen in deze strijd zetten.
Date: 2015
Abstract: Antisemitisme.be recense, depuis l’année 2001, les actes antisémites commis sur l’ensemble du territoire belge et, chaque année, publie un rapport sur l’antisémitisme en Belgique.Dans ce document, vous découvrirez la liste de tous les incidents recensés, notre méthodologie de travail, une réflexion sur l’antisionisme ainsi qu’une analyse de l’année écoulée.

Les incidents recensés et analysés dans ce rapport sont ceux qui nous ont été communiqués ou qui ont fait l’objet d’une plainte pour racisme. Les chiffres repris dans cette analyse reflètent bien sûr une tendance et non une photographie exacte dans l’antisémitisme en Belgique.

Comme la Communauté juive en a fait la tragique expérience le samedi 24 mai 2014 après l’attentat contre le Musée Juif de Belgique, l’antisémitisme ne se quantifie pas seulement par les chiffres mais aussi par la nature des incidents recensés.

Tant que les membres de la Communauté juive se sentiront, à juste titre, en insécurité, tant que les institutions juives auront besoin d’être protégées, tant qu’ils ne pourront pas circuler comme tout citoyen belge en toute sécurité lorsqu’il arbore un signe apparent de judaïté (kippa, étoile de David…), l’antisémitisme devra être combattu et les autorités politiques devront y mettre tous les moyens.


Sinds 2001, identificeert Antisemitisme.be antisemitische handelingen in het hele Belgische grondgebied, en publiceert jaarlijks een verslag over antisemitisme in België.

In dit document vind u onze werk methodologie en een analyse van het afgelopen jaar.

Incidenten geïdentificeerd en geanalyseerd in dit verslag zijn ofwel gecommuniceerd of dat het onderwerp van een klacht over racisme zijn geweest. De cijfers in deze analyse, zijn zeker als gevolg van een trend, maar geven niet een nauwkeurig beeld van antisemitisme in België.

Antisemitisme kan niet worden gekwantificeerd in aantallen, maar ook door de ernst van de incidenten, zoals de tragische ervaring die de Joodse gemeenschap zaterdag 24 mei, jl. heeft mee moeten maken.

Zolang de leden van de Joodse gemeenschap zich terecht onveilig voelen, de Joodse instellingen beschermd moeten worden, ze niet in staat zijn om veilig te bewegen net als elke andere Belg wanneer ze enig duidelijk teken van joodse identiteit (Kippa, Ster van David, …) dragen, moet antisemitisme bestreden worden en de politieke autoriteiten moeten alle middelen in deze strijd zetten.
Author(s): Kosmin, Barry A.
Date: 2016
Abstract: Launched by the American Jewish Joint Distribution
Committee’s International Centre for Community
Development (JDC-ICCD), and conducted by a research
team at Trinity College (Hartford, Connecticut, USA)
between June and August 2015, the Third Survey of
European Jewish Leaders and Opinion Formers presents
the results of an online survey administered to 314
respondents in 29 countries. The survey was conducted
online in five languages: English, French, Spanish, German
and Hungarian. The Survey of European Jewish Leaders
and Opinion Formers is conducted every three or four
years using the same format, in order to identify trends
and their evolution. Findings of the 2015 edition were
assessed and evaluated based on the results of previous
surveys (2008 and 2011).
The survey posed Jewish leaders and opinion formers a
range of questions about major challenges and issues that
concern European Jewish communities in 2015, and about
their expectations of how communities will evolve over
the next 5-10 years. The 45 questions (see Appendix) dealt
with topics that relate to internal community structures
and their functions, as well as the external environment
affecting communities. The questionnaire also included
six open-ended questions in a choice of five languages.
These answers form the basis of the qualitative analysis
of the report. The questions were organized under the
following headings:
• Vision & Change (6 questions)
• Decision-Making & Control (1 question)
• Lay Leadership (1 question)
• Professional Leadership (2 questions)
• Status Issues & Intermarriage (5 questions)
• Organizational Frameworks (2 questions)
• Community Causes (2 questions)
• Jewish Education (1 question)
• Funding (3 questions)
• Communal Tensions (3 questions)
• Anti-Semitism/Security (5 questions)
• Europe (1 question)
• Israel (1 question)
• Future (2 questions)
• Personal Profile (9 questions)
Date: 2011
Abstract: Objectives. In Belgium, dominant ideological traditions – Christianity and non-religious humanism – have the floor in debates on euthanasia and hardly any attention is paid to the practices and attitudes of ethnic and religious minorities, for instance, Jews. This article aims to meet this lacuna.

Design. Qualitative empirical research was performed in the Orthodox Jewish community of Antwerp (Belgium) with a purposive sample of elderly Jewish (non-)Hasidic and secularised Orthodox women. In-depth interviews were conducted to elicit their attitudes towards (non-)voluntary euthanasia and assisted suicide.

Results. The research reveals diverse views among women in the community on intentionally terminating a patient's life. Absolute rejection of every act which deliberately terminates life is found among the overwhelming majority of (religiously observant) Orthodox (Hasidic and non-Hasidic) women, as they have an unconditional faith and trust in God's sovereign power over the domain of life and death. On the other hand, the views of secularised Orthodox women – mostly irreligious women, who do not consider themselves Orthodox, thus not following Jewish law, yet say they belong to the Orthodox Jewish community –show an acceptance of voluntary euthanasia and assisted suicide but non-voluntary euthanasia is approached more negatively. As they perceive illness and death as merely profane facts, they stress a patient's absolute right towards self-determination, in particular with regard to one's end of life. Among non-Hasidic Orthodox respondents, more openness is found for cultivating a personal opinion which deviates from Jewish law and for the right of self-determination with regard to questions concerning life and death. In this study, these participants occupy an intermediate position.

Conclusion. Our study reveals an interplay between ethical attitudes on euthanasia and religious convictions. The image one has of a transcendental reality, or of God, has a stronger effect on one's (dis)approval of euthanasia than being (ir)religious.

Search results

Your search found 101 items
copy result link
You ran an advanced options search Previous | Next
Sort: Relevance | Topics | Title | Author | Publication Year View all 1 2 3